Here & Now

Mondays - Thursdays 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Jeremy Hobson & Robin Young

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews. A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation. Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe. Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country. Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

The United States reached the knockout stage of consecutive World Cups for the first time, just not the way the Americans wanted.

Germany beat the U.S. 1-0 Thursday in soggy Recife on Thomas Mueller’s 55th-minute goal to win Group G, but the Americans held onto second place when Portugal defeated Ghana 2-1 in a game played simultaneously in Brasilia.

Rosanne Cash Speaks Out On Music Licensing

Jun 26, 2014

Rosanne Cash, musician and daughter of country music legend Johnny Cash, is urging Congress to do more to protect intellectual property rights in the digital age.

She testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee yesterday in support of the Respect Act, which would compensate artists for digital performances of songs recorded before 1972. Right now, there is no federal copyright protection for those recordings.

Neil Gaiman has won a wide following with novels like “American Gods,” “The Ocean at the End of the Lane” and “Coraline,” and he’s read his works aloud numerous times.

Reverend Frank Schaefer says his reinstatement by the Methodist Church “brings a lot of hope” to the LGBTQ community in the Methodist Church.

Reverend Schaefer was defrocked last November for officiating his son’s same-sex wedding, after saying that he would not let Church doctrine stop him from officiating same-sex weddings in the future, if asked.

He has now been fully re-instated and assigned to a new congregation, but the decision has deepened the divide over same-sex and gender issues in the Methodist Church.

The U.S. economy has shrank at an annual rate of 2.9 percent in the first quarter of this year, according to the Commerce Department. This is the fastest rate of decline since the recession ended five years ago.

Joe Weisenthal of the Business Insider joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the forces behind the decline and what we can expect for the future.

John Waters has never been afraid of taking risks. His films have depicted everything from convicted criminals to coprophagia, and he’s often been in the news for his controversial opinions.

Where Are We On The Housing Market?

Jun 24, 2014

The Commerce Department is reporting that new home sales soared in May to their highest level since the financial market crisis six years ago. That follows a report yesterday that sales of existing homes also rose sharply last month.

But even with the gains, sales of both new and existing homes are running well below what economists consider healthy. So where are we on the housing market?

Chris Low, chief economist at FTN Financial joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the housing market.

Sports correspondent Tom Perrotta, writes that “women’s tennis has finally found its future.” And it’s beyond the hands of Maria Sharapova, or Serena and Venus Williams.

American Sloane Stevens, 21, lost on day one of Wimbledon yesterday, but 18-year-old Taylor Townsend plays today. They’re both up-and-coming players to watch, along with 20-year-old Canadian Eugenie Bouchard, who also plays today.

The U.S. Conference of Mayors is wrapping up its annual meeting in Dallas, Texas. The annual conference covers urban policies ranging including climate change, education, same-sex marriage, inequality and economic growth.

Raising the minimum wage was much discussed, because Seattle recently raised its minimum wage to $15 an hour.

The Ghostly Sound Of The Theremin

Jun 23, 2014

Even if you’re not familiar with the musical instrument called the theremin, chances are you’ve heard its ghostly sound. The theremin is unique because of how it’s played: you make music without touching it. Theremin player Jon Bernhardt discusses the instrument and plays some music for Here & Now’s Sacha Pfeiffer.

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