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Here & Now

Mondays - Thursdays 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Jeremy Hobson & Robin Young

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews. A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation. Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe. Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country. Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

The biggest legal battle in college sports history is wrapping up its first week of arguments in a courtroom in Oakland, California.

Former UCLA basketball star Ed O’Bannon is the lead plaintiff in a class action suit against the NCAA.

Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca discusses what’s at stake in the lawsuit with host Jeremy Hobson.

States Reconsider Common Core

Jun 13, 2014

The Common Core education standards have been a point of contention for school boards around the country. Forty-five states and the District of Columbia have adopted the standards which aim to create a more homogenous education across the country.

While many states signed on, some states have already completely dropped the program and others make modifications in state legislatures where there are currently more than 340 bills addressing college and career readiness programs.

In Boris Fishman‘s debut novel “A Replacement Life,” Slava is an immigrant from the former Soviet Union who wants to make it as a writer at a prestigious magazine. In order to do so, he moves to Manhattan and minimizes contact with his family in Brooklyn.

The Library of Congress has chosen Southern writer Charles Wright to serve as the nation’s next poet laureate beginning this fall.

Wright hails from Pickwick Dam, Tennessee. For years, he was a professor at the University of Virginia.

He began writing poetry while he was stationed in Italy with the U.S. Army, inspired by the work of Ezra Pound.

In announcing the selection, Librarian of Congress James Billington says Wright is a master of the “meditative, image-driven lyric.”

Does Lockdown Training Save Lives?

Jun 12, 2014

New details are emerging today about the school shooting at Reynolds High School in Troutdale, Oregon, earlier this week.

Officials have identified the shooter as freshman student Jared Michael Padgett, and say he was armed with an AR-15 rifle and carrying nine loaded magazines, which could have shot off several hundred rounds. The gun and ammunition belonged to the boy’s family. Padget killed fellow freshman Emilio Hoffman and wounded a teacher.

Brad Meltzer is known for writing political thrillers like “The Inner Circle” and hosting the History Channel series “Decoded.” But he’s also the author of “Ordinary People Change the World,” a series of children’s picture books.

Taxi Strikes Across Europe Protest Uber App

Jun 11, 2014

City streets across Europe are jammed today as tens of thousands of taxi drivers block traffic. Cabbies in Madrid, Milan, Paris and London are protesting Uber, the smartphone app-based chauffeur service that they say is threatening their livelihood.

The Environmental Risks Of Corn Production

Jun 11, 2014

Nearly one-third of all U.S. cropland is used for corn — but it’s not all the type you eat off the cob. More than a third of U.S. corn is used for animal feed, with another third grown for ethanol for cars.

Growing corn uses a lot of water and fertilizer, and some of these production techniques, coupled with the effects of climate change, are threatening U.S. corn production.

Police in Oregon say a gunman fatally shot a student at a high school near Portland.

Authorities said Tuesday the suspect also was dead and the situation is stabilized.

The Multnomah County sheriff’s office said there were reports of shots fired about 8 a.m. at Reynolds High School in Troutdale.

Authorities say they’re now focusing on reuniting students with their parents.

World Cup Preview

Jun 10, 2014

The 2014 World Cup gets underway on Thursday, when host country Brazil takes on Croatia. Then 63 more soccer games will be played until one of the 32 teams is crowned winner on July 13.

Bill Littlefield, the host of NPR’s Only A Game, joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson and Meghna Chakrabarti to talk about the teams and the players, who are carrying with them the hopes of entire countries.

YouTube videos have surfaced of 31-year-old Jerad Miller, in which he rants about not trusting police or government and relying on guns to protect himself from forces that want to limit his freedom.

He and his 22-year-old wife Amanda Miller shot and killed two police officers and a third person in Las Vegas on Sunday, before taking their own lives.

The Millers left a “Don’t tread on me” flag and a swastika on the body of one of the officers.

Nineteenth-century landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted designed some of America’s most well-known green spaces, including Central Park in New York City.

A new documentary, “Frederick Law Olmsted: Designing America,” which premieres on PBS stations around the country on June 20, shows how Olmsted not only designed the city parks, but influenced the way America looked at landscape design.

Robert Schenkkan’s “All The Way” has won the Tony Award for best play.

Starring Bryan Cranston, the play focuses on President Lyndon B. Johnson’s first year in office and explores both his fight for re-election and the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Cranston, the former “Breaking Bad” star also nabbed the Tony for best lead actor in a play in his Broadway debut.

Also, after years of helping hand out Tony Awards to others, Neil Patrick Harris finally has one of his own.

Study Looks At What's Killing Centenarians

Jun 9, 2014

The population of centenarians — people age 100 and over — is growing across the globe.

People over 100 years are expected to reach 3.2 million by 2050, according to a new study by Kings College in London.

The study, which examined the cause of death among the growing demographic, found that centenarians are less likely to die of cancer or heart disease at that age, and more likely to die from pneumonia or frail health.

Walmart’s annual meeting today is a star-studded affair, but the company’s new CEO Doug McMillon has a big challenge on his hands.

The giant retailer faces increased scrutiny amid allegations of bribery in Mexico, lack of oversight in Bangladesh factories, and growing criticism about low wages and benefits, and high compensation for its executives.

Bob Moon of Bloomberg Radio tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson that this comes as Walmart is seeing declining sales for five consecutive quarters.

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