Here & Now

Mondays - Thursdays 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Jeremy Hobson & Robin Young

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews. A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation. Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe. Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country. Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

Sybrina Fulton, the mother of slain teenager Trayvon Martin, testified this morning in the ongoing trial of George Zimmerman. Zimmerman is charged with second degree murder in Martin’s death. Martin’s parents have been in the court every day of the trial.

It seems like a simple question: how does the human brain change over the course of a year? It turns out, we know remarkably little about that. But one scientist at the University of Texas in Austin is trying to answer that question—and to do it, he’s had to take a pretty unusual approach — getting frequent MRI’s of his brain.

Wimbledon 'Upsets' Get Linguist Thinking

Jul 5, 2013

It’s down to the wire at Wimbledon, the men’s finals are on Sunday, the women’s on Saturday. And some of the biggest names will not be participating, because there have been a lot of upsets—Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Serena Williams and Maria Sharapova all lost in the early rounds. These upsets had linguist Ben Zimmer thinking about the use of the word “upset.”

And that got him thinking about a horse race in 1919.

Fourth of July means we’ll be hearing a lot of John Philip Sousa’s famous military march “Stars and Stripes Forever.”

The big highlight comes toward the end, when the piccolos in the orchestra stand and let loose over the rest of the orchestra.

But imagine being the piccolo player who has to play that part over and over.

“The first time I played it was in the seventh grade,” Jim Walker, the retired principal flutist and piccolo player for the Los Angeles Philharmonic told Here & Now.

Is Your DNA Private? It Might Not Be

Jul 4, 2013

Would you want your girlfriend’s parents to be able to test your DNA to find out your ancestry? What if the grad school you were applying to wanted to test for tendencies for mental illness?

Within a few years, the cost of DNA sequencing may be just a few hundred dollars. When it gets that cheap, it will be easy for anyone to get a test.

But should there be legal restrictions on it? And is there a way to keep our DNA private?

The Rowing Team That Stunned the World

Jul 4, 2013

In 1936, a rowing team from the University of Washington stunned the world by winning a gold medal in eight-oar crew at the Berlin Olympics in front of a crowd that included Adolph Hitler and Joseph Goebbels.

The sons of American loggers, farmers and shipyard workers defeated elite European teams, grabbing the attention of millions of Americans and transforming the sport.

How To Shoot Photos Of Fireworks

Jul 4, 2013

Spectacular firework displays are the grand finale of big Fourth of July celebrations.

Boston Globe freelance photographer Aram Boghosian will be at Boston’s Charles River Esplanade for tonight’s event and has some tips for how to take great photographs.

The Fourth of July is one of the busiest times of the year on the Jersey Shore. Of course this year, many communities are still recovering from Superstorm Sandy.

Determined to be prepared for the next big storm, some property owners are lifting their homes and businesses higher above sea level.

The people who do this work are called “house jackers.” And they are in high demand these days.

There have been 22 cases in the past three years of a deadly new strain of meningitis that has spread in New York’s gay, bisexual and MSM (men who have sex with men) communities.

Seven of the men who contracted the illness died.

Jobless rates for people between the ages of 18 to 25 are skyrocketing across the European Union.

EU leaders recently took a step to try to stem the tide by agreeing to pump $8 billion into job training programs for young people.

Young people in Greece are being hit especially hard. The unemployment rate for them is more than 60 percent.

Applying 'Moneyball' Methods To The NBA

Jul 3, 2013

You’re probably familiar with the Brad Pitt movie, “Moneyball” — or the book it was based on by Michael Lewis. The financially strapped Oakland A’s, unable to afford the best players, put together a successful team using data analysis.

Houston native and Rockets fan Muthu Alagappan is trying to do the same for basketball.

Some of the most famous words ever written about Gettysburg were penned by the great southern writer William Faulkner.

In his 1948 novel “Intruder In The Dust,” Faulkner wrote about the promise the afternoon of July 3, 1863, held for the southern cause, the moment before the Confederate attack that became known as “Pickett’s Charge.”

A Look At The Economy Midway Through 2013

Jul 3, 2013

This week marks the halfway point of the year. Where is the economy today?

This also is the 4th anniversary of the start of the “recovery.” The GDP has been growing non-stop since late June or early July of 2009.

Have most people now completely recovered financially?

Heartbeats Could Replace Passwords

Jul 2, 2013

The average person has 30 to 50 accounts requiring a password, but uses only about five different passwords. And the most common password is still “password.”

Security experts say people should use a different password for each account, with each password at least 14 characters long.

Instead of memorizing all those passwords, what if the key to unlocking everything could be linked to something unique about you — like the rhythm of your heart?

That’s what biometric researchers in Toronto have come up with.

With the Supreme Court weighing in on gay marriage, can Hollywood be far behind?

Filmmakers often use wedding movies to address issues like commitment and family dysfunction, says Los Angeles Times film writer Steven Zeitchik.

We talk to Zeitchik about movies including “The Wedding Banquet,” “Four Weddings and a Funeral,” “Wedding Crashers,” “Bridesmaids,” “Father of the Bride,” “Rachel Getting Married” and “The Graduate.”

Google has pulled the plug on its RSS service, Google Reader.

Launched in 2005, it was designed to help people organize information on the Internet by sorting content into a manageable, constantly updated feed.

Here & Now Comes to Valley Public Radio

Jun 25, 2013

Beginning on July 1, 2013 Valley Public Radio will broadcast Here & Now, Monday thru Thursday from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. to meet growing audience demand for midday news and analysis.

A live production from NPR and WBUR, Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening, with timely, smart and in-depth news and conversation.  NPR's Science Friday will continue to air on Fridays from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Pages