Here & Now

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Jeremy Hobson & Robin Young

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews. A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation. Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe. Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country. Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

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NPR Story
9:40 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Tampa Courts Cuba For Future Business

A street in Trinidad, Cuba. (Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 2:44 pm

Miami may be closer to Cuba and home to more people of Cuban ancestry, but Tampa is ready to capitalize on economic and diplomatic ties to to the island nation once the longstanding trade embargo is lifted.

Tampa business owners are talking about how to expand into Cuba, and politicians are making trips there.

“In Tampa, they supported the revolution that freed Cuba from Spain. They supported the Castro revolution. They consider themselves a lifeline to Cuba,” Eric Barton of the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting told Here & Now.

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NPR Story
12:32 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Australian Rocker Mia Dyson Builds U.S. Fanbase

Mia Dyson's latest album is "The Moment." (miadyson.com)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 8:50 am

Australian rocker Mia Dyson got the break of her career when she was taken on by former Eurythmics star Dave Stewart’s production company.

But after he started to market her as a bi-gender musician named “Boy,” she rebelled and went out on her own.

Mia Dyson has now released a new album “The Moment.” Here & Now producer Emiko Tamagawa caught up with Mia on tour.

“This record is the result of that three year period of moving here, struggling, then going with Dave Stewart, then it all falling apart,” Dyson said.

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NPR Story
12:32 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Competing For The Most Creative Beer Names

Brian O'Connell of Denver's Renegade Brewing shows off the new design for his renamed beer, Redacted. (Megan Verlee/Colorado Public Radio)

There are more than 2,300 breweries operating in the United States, according to The Brewers Association. That’s the highest number since the 1880s.

You probably know these small brewers by the interesting names they have for their suds: Smooth Hoperator, Polygamy Porter and Donkey Punch come to mind.

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NPR Story
12:32 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

The Brain Science Of Drinking Diet Soda

(kenudigit/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 11:54 am

More and more Americans are consuming artificial sweeteners as an alternative to sugar, but whether this translates into better health has been heavily debated.

NPR’s Allison Aubrey explains a new study in the journal “Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism” that looks at the brain science behind drinking diet soda.

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NPR Story
10:50 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Displacement Can Last A Lifetime For Many Refugees

A Syrian refugee boy, right, sits outside his tent next to his family at a temporary refugee camp in the eastern Lebanese town of Marj near the border with Syria, Lebanon, Monday, May 20, 2013. (Hussein Malla/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 7:05 am

According to a recent report by the United Nations, more than 45 million people worldwide were forced to flee their homes in 2012 — the highest number of refugees in nearly two decades.

People leave their homes for many reasons, including war and violence, environmental disaster and persecution. More than half of the refugees worldwide came from five countries, according to the UN: Afghanistan, Somalia, Iraq, Sudan and Syria.

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NPR Story
10:46 am
Wed July 10, 2013

A Jedi Knight In Queen Elizabeth's Court

Cover art from "William Shakespeare's Star Wars." (Quirk Books)

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 9:50 am

What if William Shakespeare had written Star Wars? Well now we know!

Ian Doescher, author of “William Shakespeare’s Star Wars: Verily, A New Hope” pulls back curtain on the eternal question: what does a wookie sound like in Elizabethan English?

Book Excerpt: ‘William Shakespeare’s Star Wars’

By: Ian Doescher

BIGGS: Make haste, O Luke. Methinks they do approach

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NPR Story
10:46 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Spain's Population Declines Amid Economic Crisis

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 8:50 am

The economic crisis in Spain, where the unemployment rate is a record 27 percent, is forcing people to leave the country to look for work.

The BBC’s Tom Burridge reports the birthrate in Spain is also falling, because couples believe they can’t afford to have children under the economic circumstances.

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The Salt
9:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Do Diet Drinks Mess Up Metabolisms?

Some researchers think that artificial sweeteners, most frequently consumed in diet drinks, may confuse the body.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 2:10 pm

It may seem counterintuitive, but there's a body of evidence to suggest that the millions of Americans with a diet soda habit may not be doing their waistlines — or their blood sugar — any favors.

As the consumption of diet drinks made with artificial sweeteners continues to rise, researchers are beginning to make some uncomfortable associations with weight gain and other diseases.

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NPR Story
12:46 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Advice Columnist Margo Howard Retires

Margo Howard is retiring from the advice business, and now working on a book about her life.

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 4:17 am

Margo Howard is the only child of the beloved advice columnist Ann Landers. Her mother’s twin sister, Pauline Phillips, was Dear Abby.

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NPR Story
12:46 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

The Tricky Business Of Farming — CSA Style

Michael Baute farms three acres in Fort Collins, Colo. One-third of Spring Kite Farms goes to the farm’s CSA, or Community Supported Agriculture, clients. (Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media)

Within the local food movement, the community-supported agriculture (CSA) model is highly valued. You buy a share of a farmer’s produce up-front as a shareholder, then if all goes well, you reap the rewards at harvest time.

But running a CSA can bring with it some tricky business decisions.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Harvest Public Media’s Luke Runyon reports.

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NPR Story
12:46 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Barnes & Noble CEO Resigns

Barnes & Noble CEO William Lynch Jr. has resigned. The company has faced poor earnings reports and recently announced that it would stop manufacturing its own e-reader, the Nook.

What do these changes mean for Barnes & Noble, and booksellers?

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NPR Story
10:54 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Cory Doctorow To Young Readers: Hold Government Accountable

Art by Yuko Shimizu on the cover of Cory Doctorow's "Homeland." (Tor Books)

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 1:15 pm

In the best selling books “Little Brother” and “Homeland,” Cory Doctorow uses his hero, teenage hacktivist Marcus Yallow, to get young people to think about privacy, civil liberties and the duties of the citizen in the age of the Internet.

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NPR Story
10:54 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Citizen Journalist Killed In Syria

Syrian citizen journalist Fidaa al-Baali is pictured with his camera and a group of children. (Activists News Association/Facebook)

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:46 pm

Fidaa al-Baali was a trusted source for international journalists.  He used his video camera to document the Syrian war and anti-government protests. Baali died last Friday.

We talk about his contributions, and have an update of the continuing upheaval in his country.


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NPR Story
10:54 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Kentucky Senate Race Will Be One Of 2014's Most Watched

U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell, left, and his challenger, Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:46 pm

Republican Mitch McConnell first won election to the Senate nearly 30 years ago, in 1984. This year he faces a Democrat who was born just a few years before McConnell took office, 34-year-old Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

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NPR Story
12:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Andy Murray Ends Britain's 77-Year Wimbledon Wait

Andy Murray of Britain poses with the trophy after defeating Novak Djokovic of Serbia during the Men's singles final match at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in Wimbledon, London, Sunday, July 7, 2013. (Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP)

After 77 years, a British man finally won Wimbledon. Andy Murray beat Novak Djokovic in three straight sets.

When it was over, Murray acted as if he couldn’t quite believe it, and most of Britain felt the same way.

Michael Goldfarb is a longtime public radio journalist who has been living in Britain for a third of that 77-year wait. Over the years, Goldfarb has vowed that he will leave Britain if a Brit ever won Wimbledon.

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NPR Story
12:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Pokey LaFarge's Love Song To The Midwest

Musician and songwriter Pokey LaFarge is based in St. Louis, Missouri. (Joshua Black Wilkins)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 10:50 am

Stephen Thompson, writer and editor for NPR Music, brings us a new song each week.

This week he introduces us to the music of musician and songwriter Pokey LaFarge, with his new song “Central Time” from his self titled album.

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NPR Story
12:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Egyptian Americans React To Political Upheaval

Abrar Rageh is a junior scientist at University of Minnesota. (Abrar Rageh/LinkedIn)

More than 50 supporters of ousted president Mohammed Morsi were killed in an outburst of violence around the time of morning prayers on Monday, according to Egypt’s state news agency.

The violence erupted outside of the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo, where Morsi supports were holding a sit-in to demand his release. He’s under house arrest.

With so much in flux, what is it like for Egyptian Americans to watch this unfold? We hear from Abrar Rageh, a junior scientist at the University of Minnesota in the department of Opthamology.

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NPR Story
10:50 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Buddhist Monk Confronts Japan's Suicide Culture

Alarmed by a rise in people jumping to their deaths in front of trains, Japanese railway operators are installing special blue lights above station platforms they hope will have a soothing effect and reduce suicides, Oct. 14, 2009. (Itsuo Inouye/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 12:27 pm

Japan’s suicide rate is twice that of the United States. More than 30,000 people a year kill themselves in Japan.

So many people jump in front of subway trains that when a train stops between stations, people just assume it’s a suicide.

A Buddhist monk, Ittetsu Nemoto, decided he wanted to do something about that. He now works with depressed Japanese people who make the journey to his temple.

Larissa MacFarquhar, a staff writer for The New Yorker, wrote about Nemoto in a recent issue.

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NPR Story
10:47 am
Mon July 8, 2013

How To Garden In Drought And Heat

A volunteer at the USDA People's Garden tends to garlic. (Lance Cheung/USDA)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 12:27 pm

With much of the country under drought conditions and temperatures soaring in the rest of the country, what is a backyard gardener to do?

Ahmed Hassan is a professional landscaper and former host of Turf Wars and Yard Crashers on the DIY network and HGTV. Hassan told Here & Now that the most important things to think about when prepping your garden for drought are the type of plants you use and how you treat your soil.

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NPR Story
10:46 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Fears Of Civil War In Egypt After 'Massacre'

An Egyptian man cries outside a morgue after carrying the corpse of his brother killed near the Republican Guard building in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, July 8, 2013. (Manu Brabo/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 12:27 pm

The only Islamist group to join the military in deposing the elected government of Mohammed Morsi says it will withdraw its support for the transition plan in response to what it calls a “massacre” of pro-Morsi supporters.

Egypt’s state news agency says at least 51 civilians are dead and over 400 injured after the Egyptian army opened fire on hundreds of Islamists who had been holding a sit-in outside the offices of the Republican Guard in Cairo.

The protesters were demanding that the army reinstate Mohammed Morsi to the presidency.

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