Here & Now

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Jeremy Hobson & Robin Young

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews. A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation. Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe. Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country. Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Ann Leary On Alcoholism And Keeping A Marriage Together

Ann Leary, author of "The Good House" and New York Times "Modern Love" columnist. (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Author Ann Leary isn’t shy about mining her life for her writing.

In a New York Times column, she wrote about how her marriage to actor Denis Leary came to the brink of divorce, but that admitting their need to separate actually kept them together.

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

DA's Office Asks For DNA In Exchange For Dropped Charges

DNA Self-Collection Kit (Pelle Sten/flickr)

Prosecutors in Orange County, Calif., have taken the rare if not unique step of creating their own DNA database.

They’re asking for voluntary DNA swabs from people arrested for minor crimes such as shoplifting, in exchange for dropping charges.

The argument is that it could help authorities solve cold cases.

Experts and other district attorneys are taking note.

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Mercury Treaty Puts Spotlight On Japan's Minamata Chemical Disaster

Visitors viewing photographs of deceased Minamata disease victims displayed at the Minamata Tokyo Exhibition in 1996 (Timothy S. George)

Representatives from 140 countries gather in Minamata, Japan, this week to sign a global agreement to reduce mercury in the environment.

This comes nearly 80 years after a chemical plant in Minamata began releasing methyl mercury into the ocean.

The resulting mercury poisoning affected some 60,000 people and was officially recognized as Minamata disease in 1956.

The chemical poisoning is described as one of the world’s worse environmental disasters.

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NPR Story
2:37 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

DJ Sessions: Dark And Soulful In Los Angeles

The Los Angeles-based musician, Kauf. (facebook.com/kaufaudio)

Los Angeles boasts artists from Charles Mingus to The Byrds.

KCRW DJ Travis Holcombe gives Here & Nows Jeremy Hobson a sonic tour of L.A., including new songs by Beck, funk duo The Internet, singer-songwriter Banks and electronic producer Kauf.

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NPR Story
2:37 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Legal Questions Over Special Ops Raids

Accused al-Qaida leader Anas al-Libi is being questioned in U.S. military custody on a Navy Ship, even as questions rise about the laws under which he was captured and is being held.

The U.S. Army’s Delta Force conducted raids in Somalia and in the Libyan capital, Tripoli, over the weekend, capturing al-Libi, who is suspected of masterminding the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in East Africa.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has said al-Libi was a “legal target,” and added that the raids show that terrorists who attack American interests “can run but they can’t hide.”

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NPR Story
2:37 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

New $100 Bills Aimed At Stopping Counterfeiters

The new $100 bill has additional security features, and goes into circulation today. (newmoney.gov)

Despite the government shutdown, the Federal Reserve starts distributing its brand new $100 bills to banks today.

The new $100 bill is the first redesign since 1996, and includes new features to thwart counterfeiters.

Jason Bellini of the Wall Street Journal joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to explain.

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NPR Story
1:11 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Historian Reveals Ben Franklin's Not-So-Famous Sister

Here & Now's Alex Ashlock spoke to historian Jill Lepore at the Granary Burying Ground in Boston, where Benjamin and Jane Franklin's parents are buried. (aScratch/Flickr)

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:50 am

Benjamin Franklin is arguably the most famous American ever. His youngest sister Jane is mostly lost to history. But Harvard historian Jill Lepore found her in the letters she and her brother exchanged over their long lives. They were called Benny and Jenny and Benny wrote more letters to Jenny than he did to anyone else. Most of his survive; many of hers do not.

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NPR Story
1:11 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

What Happens If The Debt Ceiling Isn't Raised?

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 3:08 pm

All eyes are on whether Congress will resolve the government shutdown, which has entered its seventh day.

But an even more serious concern is the debt ceiling.

If lawmakers on Capitol Hill fail to raise the nation’s debt ceiling by October 17th, the government will run out of money to pay all of its bills.

If this were to happen it hurt the economy and the country’s credit rating, and some people simply wouldn’t get paid.

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NPR Story
1:11 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Rodriguez Sues MLB, Yankees' Doctor

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 3:08 pm

This weekend, the Oakland A’s beat the Detroit Tigers 1 to 0, and the Boston Red Sox bested the Tampa Bay Rays 7 to 4 in the American League. In the National League, the Dodgers won against the Braves 13 to 6 and the Pirates took the Cardinals 5 to 3.

But New York Yankees fans might have been paying more attention to Alex Rodriguez’s lawsuits.

On Thursday, the Yankee’s third baseman announced that he’s suing Major League Baseball and MLB commissioner Bud Selig over his 211-game suspension for taking performance enhancing drugs, claiming MLB is trying to ruin his career.

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NPR Story
2:43 pm
Fri October 4, 2013

Should You Tell Your Partner About Past Loves?

(Grant/Flickr)

Vermont couple Leon Marasco and Kate Harper were friends for 17 years before they became romantically involved.

Because of that friendship, they knew all about each other’s former partners and felt that that knowledge deepened the bond between them.

Harper and Marasco wondered if other couples had had similar experiences.

After doing interviews and collecting hundreds of stories, they found the answer seems to be yes.

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NPR Story
2:43 pm
Fri October 4, 2013

'Hump Day' Disrupts Class

The Geico commercial “Hump Day,” has gone viral.

Students at Vernon Center Middle School in Connecticut made news when they used the phrase “hump day” so much it became disruptive.

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NPR Story
2:43 pm
Fri October 4, 2013

How The Government Shutdown Is Hurting Farmers

Lawmakers battling over the food assistance program SNAP failed to pass a new farm bill this year, and the current one expired on Monday.

The farm bill traditionally touches on trade, rural development, loan credit, subsidies for farmers, a safety net for farmers and food for poor women and children.

With this season’s harvest underway, farmers are worried about getting crop insurance for the next cycle of planting.

Glenn Brunkow, a farmer in Westmoreland, Kansas, says the government shutdown is causing ripple effects for farming.

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NPR Story
11:58 am
Fri October 4, 2013

FBI Seeks Answers Following DC Car Rampage

Authorities say Miriam Carey, 34, of Stamford, Conn. was shot and killed by police after a high-speed chase. (Advanced Periodontics)

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 2:43 pm

FBI agents in Stamford, Conn., are searching for clues about why an unarmed 34-year-old mother who lived there went on a driving rampage in Washington, D.C. yesterday.

The incident resulted in her shooting death by Capitol police.

Miriam Carey was traveling with her 1-year-old daughter when she tried to breach a barrier at the White House, and then veered her car down Constitution Avenue, driving up to 80-miles-per-hour, toward the Capitol buildings. She eventually crashed into a barrier.

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NPR Story
1:19 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Andre Dubus III's Tales Of 'Dirty Love'

The latest book by Andre Dubus III is "Dirty Love." (Kevin Harkins)

Note: This segment contains content that may not be appropriate for younger listeners.

Andre Dubus III is the author of the critically-acclaimed novel “House of Sand And Fog” and memoir “Townie.”

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NPR Story
1:19 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Negotiation Expert Weighs In On Washington Stalemate

With the negotiations between Democrats and Republicans stalled in Washington, D.C., Here & Now turns to a negotiation expert.

We ask, what would get both parties to agree?

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NPR Story
1:19 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

September Jobs Report Expected To Be Delayed

Every month, investors turn to the jobs report to assess the state of the U.S. job market.

But due to the partial government shutdown that began on Tuesday, the Bureau of Labor Statistics is not expected to meet its Friday deadline for the September jobs report.

NPR business reporter Jim Zarroli joins us to talk about what that could mean for investors.

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NPR Story
4:15 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Writer Tom Clancy Dies At 66

Tom Clancy pictured at Boston College in 1989. (Wikimedia)

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 4:22 pm

Best selling author Tom Clancy died today; he was 66.

His top-selling novels helped forge a new genre of military fiction that gave readers detailed knowledge of the Pentagon and the Soviet war machine.

Best-sellers included “A Clear and Present Danger,” “Patriot Games” and “The Hunt For Red October,” which inspired the 1990 film of the same name.

Joseph Finder writes thrillers, and joins Here & Now to discuss Clancy’s legacy.

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NPR Story
4:15 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Marc Jacobs Leaves Louis Vuitton

Fashion designer Marc Jacobs, at the end of his Louis Vuitton ready to wear Spring-Summer 2013 collection, presented in Paris, Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012. (Jacques Brinon/AP)

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 1:19 pm

After months of speculation American fashion designer Marc Jacobs has announced that he is leaving Louis Vuitton.

After 16 years as the creative director for the the French fashion house best known for their LV monogrammed canvas bags, Jacobs is turning his attention to preparing the Marc Jacobs brand for an eventual public offering.

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NPR Story
4:15 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Marine Veteran Struggles To Start His Own Business

Logo for Intrepid Life Coffee and Spirits in Durham, NC. (http://intrepidlifecoffeeandspirits.com/)

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 4:23 pm

Matt Victoriano served two tours of duty as a Marine sniper team leader in Iraq.

Since he came home in 2004, he has battled post-traumatic stress disorder.

He has also struggled to find meaningful work.

We met Victoriano a year ago, when we were covering the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte.

He told us about his business plan to open a microbrewery. This brewery would also serve as an incubator for fellow veterans, to help them open their own businesses.

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NPR Story
1:35 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

'Eat, Pray, Love' Author Dives Into 19th Century Science

"Eat, Pray, Love" author Elizabeth Gilbert's latest book is "The Signature of All Things: A Novel."

Elizabeth Gilbert is known for her memoirs “Eat, Pray, Love” and “Committed.” But she dives into the world of late 18th and 19th century science to write her first novel in 13 years, “The Signature of All Things.”

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