Here & Now

Mondays - Thursdays 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Jeremy Hobson & Robin Young

Supreme Court rulings. Breaking news. Thoughtful interviews. A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation. Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe. Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country. Stay connected to what’s happening…right now…with Here & Now from NPR and WBUR.

The U.S. Conference of Mayors is wrapping up its annual meeting in Dallas, Texas. The annual conference covers urban policies ranging including climate change, education, same-sex marriage, inequality and economic growth.

Raising the minimum wage was much discussed, because Seattle recently raised its minimum wage to $15 an hour.

More Analysis Of Obama's Remarks On Iraq

Jun 19, 2014

President Obama laid out his plan to help Iraq today, including sending up to 300 military advisers to the country to train local military, and sending Secretary of State John Kerry to the region. But the president said several times that there would be no more U.S. combat troops in Iraq.

Here & Now’s Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson speak with Rick Klein, political director for ABC News, and Robert Scales, retired U.S. Army major general and former commandant of the U.S. Army War College.

More than 100,000 Cambodians have fled Thailand in recent days. They’re apparently leaving because they fear Thailand’s new military rulers are about to crack down on migrant workers in Thailand. Many of those workers are Cambodians.

The new military rulers deny they are about to crackdown on those workers, but there’s no denying they are suppressing any resistance to their rule. This is part of the fallout from last month’s coup, which ousted the former government of Yingluck Shinawatra.

Americans are expected to his the road in droves this summer, maybe heading to national parks or the beach. That includes Josie Goeres, who spends a lot of time on the road. She’s in New Mexico now, chasing after her customers for her very unusual day job. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Monica Ortiz Uribe of Fronteras Desk reports.

The new film “The Rover” is set in Australia, 10 years after the country has collapsed and degenerated into barbarism.

English-born Australian actor Guy Pearce plays a drifter whose car is stolen and who’s determined to get it back, no matter what the cost.

Architects and proponents of the Iraq War are now back with criticism of President Obama’s foreign policy.

Leading the group is former Vice President Dick Cheney, who co-wrote an op-ed with his daughter Liz Cheney in today’s Wall Street Journal. The subtitle reads, “Rarely has a U.S. President been so wrong about so much at the expense of so many.”

Gideon Rose, editor of Foreign Affairs magazine, discusses what neoconservatives are saying about President Obama and Iraq with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

American Airlines is cutting nearly 80 percent of its flights between the U.S. and Venezuela starting in July, because the Venezuelan government owes it $750 million dollars in ticket revenue.

American is the largest foreign airline serving Venezuela, and it’s just the latest carrier to suspend most or all flights to the country.

The carrier is also scrapping all direct flights to Venezuela from New York, Dallas and San Juan, Puerto Rico, and will only fly there from Miami.

The New York Hilton has modified its traditional room service model and has moved to a delivery system after the company has seen less and less room service orders at the hotel.

Hilton has not implemented this across the all of its hotels, as it says different markets have different demands.

But what about mini bars? Are the goodies in hotel room mini fridges as popular as they once were, and are they a profitable business model?

It’s being called the house call of the future: ambulance crews who rush when you call 9-1-1, but instead of taking you to the emergency room, they treat you at home.

Community paramedicine, as it’s called, is a growing trend across the country. It’s aim is to bring down hospital costs, but there are concerns about who’s going to end up paying for the service.

Startup Aims To Score With World Cup

Jun 17, 2014

The World Cup finals kicked off yesterday in Brazil. For the roughly 70,000 Brazilian immigrants in Massachusetts, the opening match between the host nation and Croatia was a reason to leave work early.

But one Boston startup is looking to the World Cup for more work.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Curt Nickisch of WBUR has the story of a small company using the global competition to prove its worth on a bigger stage.

Vice President Joe Biden heads to Guatemala this week to meet with leaders of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador about the wave of unaccompanied children coming across the U.S. Mexico border from those Central American countries.

Border patrol agents are finding children as young as 4, with notes pinned on their clothing with instructions on how to contact relatives in the U.S.

In 1936, an American rowing team from the University of Washington stunned first the elite American rowing squads by qualifying for the Berlin Olympics, and then the rest of the world by winning the gold medal in front of a crowd that included Adolf Hitler and Joseph Goebbels.

Dr. Sangeeta Bhatia has big ideas about her work with tiny organs. Using 3-D printing and human cells, she’s created a miniature human livers in her lab at MIT that can be used for testing drugs.

Dr. Bhatia is part of a bio-engineering revolution that is transforming the field of medicine. She tells Here & Now’s host Jeremy Hobson that her goal is to scale up the size of the micro-liver so it can be used as an alternative to human-to-human liver transplants.

Amazon To Jump Into Smartphone Business

Jun 16, 2014

The giant online retailer Amazon is expanding its horizons and introducing a smartphone that could top all others on the market.

Amazon is set to introduce a smartphone with 3-D features this Wednesday at a media event in Seattle. Ina Fried, a senior editor at Re/Code, tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson how Amazon may stand out from the crowded pack.

The only wooden whaling ship in the world, the Charles W. Morgan, has just emerged from a painstaking five-year restoration, and is about to depart on its 38th voyage into the waters of the Atlantic.

But instead of hunting whales, today, the Morgan is all about saving them.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, WNPR’S J Holt has the story.

The biggest legal battle in college sports history is wrapping up its first week of arguments in a courtroom in Oakland, California.

Former UCLA basketball star Ed O’Bannon is the lead plaintiff in a class action suit against the NCAA.

Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca discusses what’s at stake in the lawsuit with host Jeremy Hobson.

States Reconsider Common Core

Jun 13, 2014

The Common Core education standards have been a point of contention for school boards around the country. Forty-five states and the District of Columbia have adopted the standards which aim to create a more homogenous education across the country.

While many states signed on, some states have already completely dropped the program and others make modifications in state legislatures where there are currently more than 340 bills addressing college and career readiness programs.

In Boris Fishman‘s debut novel “A Replacement Life,” Slava is an immigrant from the former Soviet Union who wants to make it as a writer at a prestigious magazine. In order to do so, he moves to Manhattan and minimizes contact with his family in Brooklyn.

The Library of Congress has chosen Southern writer Charles Wright to serve as the nation’s next poet laureate beginning this fall.

Wright hails from Pickwick Dam, Tennessee. For years, he was a professor at the University of Virginia.

He began writing poetry while he was stationed in Italy with the U.S. Army, inspired by the work of Ezra Pound.

In announcing the selection, Librarian of Congress James Billington says Wright is a master of the “meditative, image-driven lyric.”

Does Lockdown Training Save Lives?

Jun 12, 2014

New details are emerging today about the school shooting at Reynolds High School in Troutdale, Oregon, earlier this week.

Officials have identified the shooter as freshman student Jared Michael Padgett, and say he was armed with an AR-15 rifle and carrying nine loaded magazines, which could have shot off several hundred rounds. The gun and ammunition belonged to the boy’s family. Padget killed fellow freshman Emilio Hoffman and wounded a teacher.

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