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NPR Story
1:07 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Diana Nyad 1st To Complete Cuba-To-Florida Swim Without Shark Cage

U.S. swimmer Diana Nyad, 64, begins her swim to Florida from the waters off Havana, Cuba, Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013. (Ramon Espinosa/AP)

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 1:55 pm

Note: Now that Nyad has reached shore, we have removed the live video stream.

Update 2:02 p.m.: She made it. On her fifth try, American swimmer Diana Nyad has become the first to swim to Florida from Cuba without a shark cage. She arrived this afternoon in Key West, where a crowd had gathered on the beach to see her achieve what Nyad called a “lifelong dream.”

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NPR Story
1:07 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Audio Postcard From Three Midwest State Fairs

Carnival rides are a staple of Midwest state fairs. (Screenshot from Harvest Public Media)

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 1:55 pm

State fairs in Maryland, Alaska, Nebraska, New York, Oregon, South Dakota, Minnesota and Michigan wrap up today.

Harvest Public Media reporters Amy Mayer, Abbie Fentress Swanson, Bill Wheelhouse and Jeremy Bernfeld sent us this audio postcard from the state fairs in Iowa, Missouri and Illinois.

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NPR Story
2:23 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Seamus Heaney, Considered Ireland's Greatest Poet Since Yeats, Dead at 74

Irish poet Seamus Heaney is pictured in 1991. (Joe Wrinn/Harvard University via AP)

Irish poet Seamus Heaney won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1995 and penned 13 collections of poetry, two plays and four books on the process of writing poetry.

He was widely considered the country’s greatest poet since William Butler Yeats.

Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny said, “There are no words to describe adequately our nation’s and poetry’s grief.”

Heaney’s early work surrounded the rural experience, but later writings took on the political and cultural struggles in Ireland.

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NPR Story
2:23 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Former Salinger Protegee Awaits New Documentary

Joyce Maynard is re-releasing her memoir "At Home in the World." (Rachel Rohr/Here & Now)

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 1:59 pm

A new documentary opening next week promises to shed light on the late J.D. Salinger, one of America’s most famous and mysterious authors.

One of the people who agreed to speak about the reclusive author is Joyce Maynard, who dropped out of Yale after her freshman year to live with Salinger in New Hampshire.

She received a lot of criticism for writing about that relationship in her 1998 memoir “At Home in the World.”

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NPR Story
2:23 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Lifting Jersey Shore Houses Creates Problems For Elderly, Disabled

Along the Jersey Shore, many people are elevating their Sandy-damaged homes to lift them out of reach from future storms.

But lifting homes presents unique problems for elderly or disabled residents who call the Shore home.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Tracey Samuelson of WHYY explains.

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NPR Story
12:09 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Catching Up With A Pioneer Of The DIY Movement

Lloyd Kahn at his home in Bolinas, Calif. He built his home from reclaimed materials. (Nicolás Boullosa/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 1:34 pm

If you’ve ever dreamed of being self-sufficient — living off the grid, in a home you built yourself — meet Lloyd Kahn.

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NPR Story
12:09 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Russia Sending Two Warships Near Syrian Waters

A Russian anti-submarine ship is pictured in Vladivostok, Russia, in April 2009. (AP)

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 1:34 pm

Russia, Syria’s most powerful ally, is sending a large anti-submarine ship and a missile cruiser into the Eastern Mediterranean, as the U.S. moves toward a military response in Syria.

Russian president Vladimir Putin says the naval deployment is required for protecting Russian national security interests and not a threat to any nation.

Defense experts say the warships could give the Syrian regime early warning of missile launches, an possibly jam radars and navigational systems.

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NPR Story
12:09 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Judge: NFL, Players To Settle Concussion Lawsuits

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 1:34 pm

The NFL and more than 4,500 former players want to resolve concussion-related lawsuits with a $765 million settlement that would fund medical exams, concussion-related compensation and medical research, a federal judge said Thursday.

The plaintiffs include at least 10 members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, including former Dallas Cowboys running back Tony Dorsett. They also include Super Bowl-winning quarterback Jim McMahon and the family of Pro Bowl linebacker Junior Seau, who committed suicide last year.

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NPR Story
2:18 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Syria Fallout: Expect Volatile Gas Prices

The U.S. stock market has seen the biggest sell-off since May last year, and overnight the wholesale price of gas jumped up 10 cents, a cost that may or may not be passed on to consumers at the pump.

Markets watcher Phil Flynn says the crisis in Syria is “not a positive” on the global economy.

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NPR Story
2:18 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

One Of The 'Little Rock Nine' Reflects On Her Legacy

Members of the Little Rock Nine are escorted into Central High School, in 1957. They were the first black children to attend the all-white school. (Wikipedia)

Many of the people attending today’s commemoration of the March on Washington played roles big and small in the civil rights movement, from registering black voters in the South to helping to end school segregation.

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NPR Story
2:18 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

'I Have A Dream' Still Resonates With Today's Teens

High school sophomores Justin Morales, 14, Triston Childs, 15, Rachael Smith, 15, and Deja Brown, 14, watch Martin Luther King’s "I Have a Dream" speech. (Jenny Brundin/Colorado Public Radio)

Fifty years ago today, Martin Luther King Jr. unleashed a powerful and poetic torrent upon the nation — a passionate plea for racial equality and economic justice for African Americans.

Fifty years later, the “I Have a Dream” speech still resonates with a group of teenagers at William Smith High School in Aurora, a racially and ethnically diverse city east of Denver.

They recently sat down with Colorado Public Radio education reporter Jenny Brundin to watch the speech, talk about it and share their own dreams.

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NPR Story
1:02 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

U.S. Faces October Deadline On Debt Ceiling

Not being able to pay your bills is never a good thing — especially when you’re the United States government.

Treasury Secretary Jack Lew has announced that the U.S. will hit its $16.7 trillion borrowing limit in mid-October.

In 2011, the White House and congressional Republicans feuded over raising the debt ceiling, spending weeks trying to come to an agreement. Those talks failed and the financial markets roiled in reaction.

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NPR Story
1:02 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Saudi Prince's Goal: Topple Assad

Saudi Prince Bandar bin Sultan is seen at his palace in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, June 4, 2008. (Hassan Ammar/AP)

As the U.S. weighs its options on Syria, there’s an effort underway by Saudi Prince Bandar bin Sultan al-Saud, a longtime power player with a Washington scandal in his past, to topple the Assad regime by training Syrian rebels in Jordan.

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NPR Story
1:02 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Senator Bob Corker: Action Is 'Imminent' In Syria

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker, the ranking Republican on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, is pictured April 2, 2013. (Kristin M. Hall/AP)

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 7:43 am

There are now four United States Navy destroyers positioned in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea — each equipped to fire cruise missiles at targets up to 1,500 miles away.

In a speech yesterday, Secretary of State John Kerry called the use of chemical weapons on Syrian civilians “a moral obscenity,” signaling a toughening stance by the Obama administration on the Assad regime.

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NPR Story
1:44 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Juliana Hatfield And Matthew Caws Unite As 'Minor Alps'

Juliana Hatfield and Matthew Caws are Minor Alps. (Minor Alps)

This week, NPR Music writer and editor Stephen Thompson introduces us to the band Minor Alps.

The band is made up of singer-songwriter Juliana Hatfield and Matthew Caws, the lead singer of the power-pop band Nada Surf.

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NPR Story
1:44 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Retiring To The Farm Anything But Quiet

Jim Schulte and his wife, Rita, bought their 450-acre farm near Columbia, Mo., in 1991, but didn’t start farming full time until Jim finished working in the mortgage business. (Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media)

It’s not just lifelong farmers who feel the pull of the land as they get older. For some Americans, retirement is an opportunity to begin the farming dream.

“I wanted to be able to be active and have a pastime that ensured physical activity,” said beginning farmer Tom Thomas, who at 65 still has the physical fitness to wrestle and brand steers at his son’s ranch in Oklahoma.

Thomas retired two years ago after teaching exercise physiology for 35 years and he knew what he wanted to do next.

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NPR Story
1:44 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

How Far Have We Come Since The March On Washington?

Demonstrators march towards the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial during the 50th anniversary commemoration of the 1963 March on Washington Saturday, Aug. 24, 2013, in Washington. (Jose Luis Magana/AP)

Thousands of people streamed onto the National Mall in Washington this past weekend, as part of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.

On Wednesday, the actual anniversary of the event, thousands will gather at the Lincoln Memorial for what organizers are calling a “commemoration and call to action.”

So what has and hasn’t been achieved between 1963 and now, particularly for black Americans?

NPR’s Gene Demby has been thinking about this. He writes about race, ethnicity and culture as part of the network’s Code Switch team.

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NPR Story
12:58 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Fans Relish The Replacements Reunion

The Replacements are reuniting, briefly, for three shows. (The Replacements)

The Replacements were an unruly rock band that emerged from Minneapolis in the ’80s. They broke up in 1991 but are still much-beloved. This weekend they are playing their first show in more than 20 years. Here & Now producer Alex Ashlock is one of those devoted fans and he helps us understand why “Mats” fans are so excited about this.

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NPR Story
12:58 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

The Future Of Women's Rights In Afghanistan

An Afghan woman peers through the the eye slit of her burqa as she waits to try on a new burqa in shop in the old town of Kabul, Afghanistan, April 11, 2013. (Anja Niedringhaus/AP)

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 4:20 pm

As U.S. and NATO troops look to wind down operations in Afghanistan, some of the gains made in women’s rights there appear to be under increasing threat.

Two female parliamentarians and a female senator were attacked this month alone. And in July, a female police officer was shot dead in the southern province of Helmand.

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NPR Story
12:58 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

ESPN Drops TV Project On NFL Brain Injuries

This hit, Oct. 3, 2010, left the Cincinnati Bengals' Jordan Shipley (center) with a concussion, and the Cleveland Browns' T.J. Ward (right) with a fine. (Amy Sancetta/AP)

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 4:20 pm

ESPN is dropping its collaboration on a TV project about football league head injuries.

According to a New York Times report, the network is said to have received pressure from the NFL to withdraw from the Frontline documentary called “League of Denial: The NFL’s Concussion Crisis,” about the risks of football injuries on the brain.

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