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NPR Story
12:46 pm
Wed November 27, 2013

America's Most Famous Unsolved Skyjacking Case

An undated artist's sketch provided by the FBI shows a rendering of the skyjacker known as 'Dan Cooper' and 'D.B. Cooper', from the recollections of passengers and crew. (FBI)

On the day before Thanksgiving in 1971, a man known only as “D.B. Cooper” hijacked a Boeing 727 on a flight from Portland, Ore. to Seattle. He extorted 200,000 dollars in ransom and parachuted from the plane.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Feliks Banel of KUOW looks back at America’s most famous unsolved skyjacking case.

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NPR Story
12:46 pm
Wed November 27, 2013

Chef Hobson Spices Up Thanksgiving With Jalapeno Mac 'N' Cheese

Head chef for Island Creek Oyster Bar, Nicki Hobson. (Karyn Miller-Medzon)

Spicy macaroni and cheese for Thanksgiving?

That’s the tradition at Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson’s family table — particularly when his sister, Boston chef Nicki Hobson, is cooking.

The picante version of the classic comfort food is one of Jeremy’s favorites, and the first dish the Hobsons polish off at their annual celebration.

Nicki Hobson visits Here & Now and shares the recipe for how she makes the classic fare, with a flare.

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NPR Story
2:44 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Newtown Father Looks Beyond Investigator's Report

Robbie Parker, the father of six-year-old Emilie who was killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, speaks during a news conference, Saturday, Dec. 15, 2012, in Newtown, Conn. (David Goldman/AP)

Robbie Parker’s 6-year-old daughter Emilie was killed at the Sandy Hook elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut last year.

He tells Here & Now’s Robin Young that he’s seen part of the investigative report released yesterday by Connecticut prosecutors, which reveals some chilling details about shooter Adam Lanza, which prompted a new round of grieving within his family.

But Parker says there is a time “to let it go,” and “to live life in a way Emilie would be proud of.”

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NPR Story
2:44 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Wal-Mart's New CEO Is An Insider

Wal-Mart’s new choice to lead the company is longtime Wal-Mart executive Doug McMillon.

He started working at the world’s largest retailer as a summer associate in 1984 and returned in 1990, working his way up the ranks.

McMillon will face a number of challenges, including sluggish growth and accusations that Wal-Mart underpays its workers.

The Wall Street Journal’s Jason Bellini joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss McMillon and the challenges he’s facing.

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NPR Story
2:44 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

DJ Sessions: What's Coming In 2014

(Broken Bells/Facebook)

KCRW DJ Travis Holcombe is already looking forward to new music that’s coming out in 2014.

Among some of his soon-to-be-favorites is U2‘s new collaboration with the indie producer Danger Mouse. And Broken Bells is drumming up some buzz with its forthcoming album “After the Disco.”

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NPR Story
12:59 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

Brady, Manning Face Off In 'Wackiest' Game Of The Season

Tom Brady, the quarterback of the New England Patriots (left), met Peyton Manning, the quarterback of the Denver Broncos, for the fourteenth time in their careers. (Charles Krupa and Steven Savoia/AP)

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 2:53 pm

The New England Patriots beat the Denver Broncos 34-31 in overtime on Sunday, but it was an unusual game.

In the frigid New England night, Tom Brady of the Patriots and Peyton Manning of the Broncos led their teams in what has been described as the NFL’s wackiest game of the season.

This was the 14th time the two quarterbacks met on the field.

Doug Tribou joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the highlights from the game last night.

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NPR Story
12:59 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

An Effort To Preserve Heritage Turkey Breeds

A flock of heritage turkeys, including Bourbon Reds and Narragansetts. (mystuart/Flickr)

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 2:53 pm

If you’re buying a turkey in a grocery store this year, you’re probably getting a breed of turkey called Broad Breasted White. That breed makes up most of the turkeys raised by commercial farmers in the U.S.

But if everyone is eating the same type of bird, what happens to the other breeds farmers used to raise?

Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Ryan Walker of The Livestock Conservancy, which is working to preserve heritage breeds so they don’t die out.

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NPR Story
12:59 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

Forbes And Snapchat: Are The Valuations Right?

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 2:53 pm

Just as Forbes Media, which publishes Forbes magazine and Forbes.com, announced that it was up for sale earlier this month, online messaging service Snapchat announced that it was not – at least for now.

The presumed valuation of the two properties provides a snapshot of the opposing trajectories for old and new media.

Forbes has set its sale price at $400 million, which many analysts think overvalues the 96-year-old media company.

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NPR Story
1:05 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

A Look At The Stock Market 50 Years Ago Today

Wire copy from the New York General Desk of The Associated Press on the day of President John F. Kennedy's assassination. (AP)

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 2:24 pm

Early trading was mixed today on Wall Street, after the the Dow Jones industrial average closed at an all time high yesterday.

The Dow closed above 16,000 after the government reported encouraging news about the job market.

Marty Schenker joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss what happened to the stock market 50 years ago today, when news broke of President Kennedy’s death.

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NPR Story
1:05 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Sen. Hoeven: Senate Rule Change Is 'Power Grab'

Sen. John Hoeven (R-ND) voted against the so-called "nuclear option" that would make it harder for the minority party to block some presidential nominations. It passed along expected partisan lines. (hoeven.senate.gov)

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 2:24 pm

The Senate voted yesterday to invoke the “nuclear option.” Today we take a look at the potential fallout from that move.

The rule change overturned the requirement for a 60-vote majority to stop a filibuster of most presidential nominees. Now a filibuster can be stopped with a simple majority of 51.

Jim Manley a former Democratic aide compared the move to opening a Pandora’s box. Senator Mitch McConnell said “you may regret this a lot sooner than you think.”

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NPR Story
1:05 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

What Does The Future Hold For Russia's Longest-Serving Political Prisoner?

Mikhail Khodorkovsky, a Russian former oil billionaire, was imprisoned on charges of tax evasion and fraud. He is considered the best known Russian political prisoner. (khodorkovsky.com)

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 2:24 pm

Will political amnesty, proposed by the Kremlin’s Human Rights Council, free former oil billionaire Mikhail Khodorkovsky from prison, 10 years after he was jailed on charges of fraud and tax evasion?

Or will new charges be leveled that could keep the founder of the Yukos Oil Company in jail for years to come?

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NPR Story
2:41 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

Will Forte Gets Serious In 'Nebraska'

Will Forte, left, in Alexander Payne's new film, "Nebraska." (FilmNation)

Actor Will Forte is known for his offbeat, sometimes outrageous characters.

For example, MacGruber, the special ops agent with a penchant for blowing up things. Forte created the character during his years on Saturday Night Live and later played him a 2010 feature film.

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NPR Story
2:41 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

Paramount To Fight 'It's A Wonderful Life' Sequel

A scene from Frank Capra's "It's A Wonderful Life." (Wikimedia)

Independent studios Star Partners and Hummingbird Productions told Variety they are set to release a sequel to the classic holiday film, “It’s a Wonderful Life” in 2015.

However, Paramount owns the rights to the film.

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NPR Story
2:41 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

Central Texas Farmers Could Lose Water Access Due to Drought

Rice farmers in Texas could face a third year in a row of being cut off from water due to severe drought conditions. (Jeff Heimsath/StateImpact Texas)

Half of Texas is experiencing drought conditions, and for the third year in a row, rice farmers in Central Texas may be cut off from water supplies because of severe drought.

The Lower Colorado River Authority has asked the state to approve emergency plans to cut water to farmers in 2014 if reservoir lakes are at less than 55 percent capacity. The lakes are currently 36 percent full.

Homes and businesses would also face water restrictions.

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NPR Story
2:06 pm
Wed November 20, 2013

The Women In Kennedy's White House

President John F. Kennedy poses with his staff in the Oval Office. The group pooled their funds to buy Kennedy his presidential chair. Jean Lewis stands over Kennedy’s left shoulder. (Courtesy JFK Library)

This month in Washington, D.C., a group of Kennedy-era staffers met for a reunion, including some women who worked for Kennedy the White House.

While Kennedy’s womanizing is well documented, not much is known about his policies on women’s issues or the women who worked for him.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Deborah Becker of WBUR has the story of some of these trailblazers.

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NPR Story
2:06 pm
Wed November 20, 2013

Not Enough (Cod)Fish In The Sea?

Monkfish, one of the "trash fish" species that sustainable fisheries advocates say consumers should be eating more of now that cod is depleted. (Rowan Jacobsen)
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NPR Story
2:06 pm
Wed November 20, 2013

The Economic Legacy Of JFK

At the time of John F. Kennedy’s death in November 1963, an employment boom was beginning.

Stocks were soaring, swept up in the emerging “go-go” era on Wall Street. It was a time when investors were falling in love with mutual funds and conglomerates.

So, what exactly did Kennedy do? As the nation marks the 50th anniversary of his assassination, do the experts credit him with having a lasting economic legacy?

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NPR Story
2:03 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Pat Conroy No Longer Hides Behind Fiction To Tell His Family's Stories

Pat Conroy is author of "The Death of Santini." (Jennifer Hitchcock)

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 3:31 pm

Pat Conroy’s troubled family history has been the wellspring of many of his novels, including “The Great Santini” and “The Prince of Tides.”

As he tells Here & Now’s Robin Young, “No writer has been imprisoned by his family like I have, in the history of American letters. I have been writing about this family for 40 years.”

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NPR Story
2:03 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Facebook Helps Reunite Tornado Victims With Lost Mementos

Photo found in Seneca, IL. (From the Facebook page "PHOTOS found from Nov 17, 2013 Illinois Storms/Tornadoes")

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 3:31 pm

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NPR Story
2:03 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

Cleanup Continues Across Midwest After Devastating Tornadoes

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 3:31 pm

Dozens of tornadoes struck the Midwest on Sunday, leaving hundreds of homes damaged or destroyed. Now starts the long cleanup process, as families sift through the debris of what used to be their homes.

The American Red Cross and other aid groups are moving in, to provide shelters for displaced residents. NPR’s David Schaper joins Here & Now’s Robin Young with details.

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