Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Egypt has completed a major expansion of the Suez Canal after a furious year of construction, opening the new 22-mile cut in a third of the time that was initially forecast.

The $8.5 billion expansion allows two-way traffic and deepens and widens portions of the existing channels to accommodate larger vessels. Before the new construction, about 50 vessels a day transited the 146-year-old canal linking the Red Sea to the Mediterranean.

At the stroke of midnight, tens of thousands of Indians and Bangladeshis living near the border between the two countries got their own country for the first time in 70 years.

As part of an agreement between the two nations, the fate of just under 15,000 people living in 51 Bangladeshi enclaves inside India and more than 37,000 in 111 Indian enclaves in Bangladesh has finally been determined. Most will stay where they are, but change their nationality. Some are moving, and some of them are leaving behind family members.

Close on the heels of a U.S. Supreme Court decision that granted Texas the right to refuse to issue Confederate-themed license plates, a federal judge has effectively vacated a state injunction in Virginia that kept officials there from similarly blocking such plates.

Judge Jackson L. Kiser will issue a separate written order on whether the 1,700 Confederate license plates that have already been issued can be recalled by the state.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

A judge entered pleas of not guilty to 33 federal hate crime counts against Dylann Roof, the white suspect accused of gunning down nine parishioners at a black church in Charleston, S.C., last month.

Updated at 2 p.m. ET

Eighteen years and nearly $400 billion since engineers begin outlining the initial concept, a small squadron of F-35B Lightning IIs has finally been declared ready to fight.

Updated at 11 a.m. ET

Get ready for a very rare event tonight — a blue moon.

But don't expect to see a new hue. A blue moon, at least according to the modern definition of the term, has nothing to do with color. It simply means a second full moon in the same calendar month.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says it is investigating Minnesota dentist Walter Palmer, a hunting enthusiast who has been identified as the person who illegally poached Zimbabwe's famous "Cecil the Lion."

But officials are asking the public for help in locating Palmer, who has apparently gone into hiding after his identity was made public and social media lit up with scorn and vitriol.

An expert in ocean circulation tells NPR's Geoff Brumfiel that it is "highly likely" that currents in the Indian Ocean could have carried debris from the presumed crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 off Australia's west coast to Reunion Island near Madagascar.

President Obama has ordered the development of a supercomputer that is some 20 times faster than the world's current record-holder and is expected to go online by 2025.

A machine developed by China's National University of Defense Technology and housed in Guangzhou, called Tianhe-2 (Milky Way-2), is thought to currently be the fastest supercomputer in existence — variously reported as doing either 34 or 55 petaflops (1 petaflop is equivalent to 1 quadrillion floating-point operations per second).

The Taliban have confirmed reports that the group's spiritual leader, Mullah Omar, is dead, and the Afghan-based extremist organization has reportedly chosen a successor.

As Eyder reported on Wednesday, the Afghan government said it had "credible information" that Omar had died in April 2013 in Pakistan.

British cyclist Chris Froome rode to his second Tour de France win in just three years on Sunday, edging out his toughest rival, Colombian Nairo Quintana.

Syrian President Bashar Assad, in his first public address in a year, acknowledged that government forces had lost territory to rebels and needed more troops, but he vowed to crush the insurgency that has threatened to topple him.

Assad admitted that his generals have had to shift forces from one front to another to defend key territory and that the loss of some areas have caused "frustration" among ordinary Syrians.

Weeks after drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman allegedly got inside help in a daring escape from a maximum-security prison in Mexico, a Mexican federal judge has ordered three officials who worked in the facility's monitoring center at the time of the jailbreak to be formally taken into custody.

Updated at 12:50 p.m. ET

As President Obama was in Kenya to discuss the threat from Islamist extremists, in neighboring Somalia at least 10 people were killed in a suicide car bomb by militants of al-Shabab – the extremist group considered the region's biggest danger.

President Obama, wrapping up his three-day visit to Kenya, urged the east African country to "choose the path to progress" by tackling corruption, eliminating income inequality and promoting gender equality.

"I'm here as president of a country that sees Kenya as an important partner. I'm here as a friend who wants Kenya to succeed," he said in a speech at the Safaricom Indoor Arena in Nairobi.

"You can choose the path to progress, but it requires making some important choices," he said in the 40-minute speech that was broadcast on Kenyan television.

A federal judge has ruled that hundreds of women and children who were detained after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border should be released because their detention violates a 1997 court settlement that prohibits minors from being held in unlicensed, secure facilities.

Updated at 7:20 p.m.

Hillary Clinton is set to testify before a House committee investigating the Sept. 11, 2012 deaths of four Americans, including a U.S. ambassador, in Benghazi, Libya, according to her campaign.

Campaign spokesman Nick Merrill said the Democratic presidential candidate would appear on Oct. 22, but Reuters, quoting a committee statement, said the date of her testimony was still being negotiated.

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

Britain's Pearson PLC — just days after announcing it would sell The Financial Times — has made public that it is engaged in talks to dump its 50 percent stake in The Economist Group.

"Pearson confirms it is in discussions with The Economist Group Board and trustees regarding the potential sale of our 50 percent share in the group," the company said in a statement on Saturday. "There is no certainty that this process will lead to a transaction."

Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET

President Obama and Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta discussed strengthening cooperation in the fight against extremists, particularly al-Qaida-linked extremists based in neighboring Somalia.

On the first full day of an officials visit to Kenya — his first since becoming president — Obama said at a joint news conference that the threat from al-Shabab "was an extensive topic of conversation" in private meetings between the two leaders.

Updated at 1:10 p.m. ET

The Defense Department, reacting to armed citizens appearing in front of military recruiting offices around the country since last week's fatal shootings of five U.S. servicemen in Chattanooga, Tenn., has asked that "individuals not stand guard" on federal property.