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Korva Coleman

Korva Coleman is a newscaster for NPR.

In this role, she is responsible for writing, producing, and delivering national newscasts airing during NPR's newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition. Occasionally she serves as a substitute host for Weekend All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Before joining NPR in 1990, Coleman was a staff reporter and copy editor for the Washington Afro-American newspaper. She produced and hosted First Edition, an overnight news program at NPR's member station WAMU-FM in Washington, D.C.

Early in her career, Coleman worked in commercial radio as news and public affairs directors at stations in Phoenix and Tucson.

Coleman's work has been recognized by the Arizona Associated Press Awards for best radio newscast, editorial, and short feature. In 1983, she was nominated for Outstanding Young Woman of America.

Coleman earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Howard University. She studied law at Georgetown University Law Center.

A huge explosion in central Beirut has killed at least eight people and wounded at least 78, state media in Lebanon are reporting, according to NPR's Kelly McEvers. The target of the bomb isn't clear, but Reuters says the blast occurred on the same street that's home to a political group that opposes Syrian President Bashar Assad.

RealtyTrac, an online industry group that follows the foreclosure market, says the number of foreclosed properties nationally dropped dramatically in September, down by seven percent from August. And the firm says since September 2011, foreclosures are down 16 percent — that's the lowest total since July 2007.

This Sunday, the U.S. Postal Service won't be able to pay its latest $5.6 billion dollar obligation. This will be its second default; on Aug. 1 it failed to come up with a $5.5 billion dollar payment. The Service is warning of expected losses this year unless something is done:

On Oct. 8, Felix Baumgartner is going to strap himself into a specially pressurized capsule, ascend 120,000 feet into the air above New Mexico using a helium balloon, open the door - and jump out.

Don't worry, he's been practicing.

Update at 3:00 p.m. ET. No Settlement Expected Today:

NPR's Ken Barcus says that no settlement is expected today. The most likely scenario is a contract vote sometime on Sunday, he says.

The Chicago Tribune reports quotes a union attorney who said that the outlines of an agreement are there, but a vote on ending the strike is not likely until Sunday.

Our Original Post Continues:

Human Rights Watch issued an extensive report today alleging that during the Bush Administration, U.S. agents tortured 14 men who were opponents of the late Libyan leader, Moammar Gadhafi. The men were rebels and members of the Libyan Islamic Fighter Group.

It's a big political victory: Pauline Marois, the head of the separatist Parti Quebecois, was elected Tuesday as Quebec's first female premier. But her celebratory speech early today was marred when a masked gunman burst into the Montreal hall and started shooting.

Pilot and author Richard Bach was hurt Friday when the small plane he was flying tangled in power lines as he attempted to land, according to media reports.

Correction: the Runner's World calculator discussed below is used for training purposes. A pace calculator estimates that Ryan would have needed to run at about 6:50 per mile to complete a marathon in 2:59.

Our original post:

As fighting in Syria continues to spread and worsen, more Syrian civilians are trying to get out of their country. They've essentially got four choices: Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq and Turkey.

Turkey and Jordan have taken the greatest flood of people. The U.N estimates that 5,000 people arrive at Turkey's border every day seeking protection. There are several camps to house them but people are coming faster than places can be built to receive them. Refugees are also getting help from Turkey's Red Crescent Society.

Tropical Storm Isaac has been difficult to track, but its potential to affect Florida has caused the Republican National Convention to change its plans. Events for Monday have been canceled, though the committee will convene briefly. As Alan Greenblatt reported for It's All Politics, this is now the second-consecutive Republican National Convention to be delayed by a storm.

Update at 8:55 p.m. ET. Nomination Delayed:

Former astronaut Neil Armstrong, known for his words, "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind," has died. The first man ever to walk on the moon was 82.

Update at 5:15 p.m. ET:

Armstrong's family has released a statement, saying he died following cardiovascular procedures. NASA published it here. They say, "Armstrong was also a reluctant American hero who always believed he was just doing his job."

The shooting outside the Empire State Building on Friday took a new turn Saturday: New York City Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly says all nine bystanders wounded in the deadly incident were "struck either by fragments or bullets fired by the police."

Update at 2:19 a.m. ET:

Iranian state television has now raised the death toll of the earthquakes to over 250 and at least 2,000 injured, according to the Associated Press.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu got straight to the point in their joint news conference Saturday. They announced the creation of a new working group that will monitor what's happening next door in Syria and prepare for crises.

One of those crises could include the possibility that the Syrian government decides to deploy chemical weapons against rebels or other perceived enemies.

Syrian rebels are taking a pounding in Aleppo, Syria's largest city but they continue to hold some neighborhoods where they've taken control. VOA reports the Syrian government is warning of "the mother of all battles" in the commercial hub, home to millions of people. Russia says a tragedy is "imminent."

Update at 5:36 p.m. ET. U.S. Attorney Will Investigate:

During a press conference today, Mayor Tom Tait asked for calm. He also said that the Office of the U.S. Attorney had agreed to investigate the shootings.

"The first step is to get to the truth," Tait said according to the Orange County Register. "That takes some time and patience, and that's what I'm asking for."

Our Original Post Continues:

China and Russia this morning vetoed a U.N. Security Council resolution that could permit sanctions against Syria unless the government of President Bashar Assad stops using weapons against civilians. This is the third time China and Russia have rebuffed measures pushed by the United States and its allies to try to bring a halt to Syria's violent civil conflict.

Financial troubles are surfacing in another California city: Compton, just south of Los Angeles, is in trouble. Just like Stockton, Mammoth Lakes and San Bernardino, Compton's bills are too big and its income too small.

Last week, Standard and Poor's, Compton's credit rating agency, put the some of the city's bonds on credit watch. S-and-P cited problems with alleged waste, fraud and misuse of city dollars, and blamed city officials for failing to turn over documents that might clear up questions.

A day after Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney spoke to the nation's oldest civil right organization, Vice President Joe Biden appeared at the NAACP's annual convention. He quickly tackled one issue that drew Romney sustained boos — the 2010 health care overhaul.

Biden appeared in place of President Obama, who made a brief videotaped address thanking the group for its work. He walked out to warm applause, and several of his remarks were interrupted by shouts of agreement.

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