Joe Moore

Director of Program Content

Joe Moore is the Director of Program Content for Valley Public Radio. He supervises the station's news and music programming, website and radio operations, and is the host of the weekly program "Valley Edition." He is a native of Fresno and a graduate of California State University, Fresno. He has over 15 years of experience in all aspects of radio production, operations and management. Prior to joining Valley Public Radio in 2010 as the Director of Program Content, he spent six years as the station manager of KFSR, and taught audio production at Fresno State. In 2008 he was named one of Fresno's "40 Under 40" by the publication Business Street. Prior to joining Valley Public Radio, he was also active on the boards of several local non-profit organizations. His hobbies include photography, hiking and travel. Joe has a strong interest in local history and architecture, and is an avid baseball fan.

Ways To Connect

Some artists are truly prolific. Composer Franz Joseph Haydn wrote over 100 symphonies. Science Fiction writer Isaac Asimov wrote over 450 books.

Our guest is nowhere near as famous as those two men, but he is just as prolific. He has taken over 300,000 photographs of life in Fresno since 1973. He is retired Fresno attorney Howard Watkins, and some of his best work is part of a new exhibit at Fresno State’s Henry Madden Library Elipse Gallery. It’s his first solo show, and it’s on display now through August 14th.

Jim Choi and Chihiro Wimbush / Changing Season: On the Masumoto Family Farm

  In the tiny community of Del Rey sits one of the nation's most acclaimed organic farms. The Masumoto family has been farming the land there for generations, and their heirloom peaches are sought after by the country's top chefs. But the Masumoto farm is also in transition, a transition of generations, as David "Mas" Masumoto's daughter Nikiko has returned home to work with her father and keep the farm alive for another generation. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we talk about how bad fire season could be in California, drought-friendly homes, and changing electricity rates. We also talk photography in Fresno with a local photographer with a show at Fresno State and talk about a documentary about the Masumoto Family Farm in Del Rey. 


Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

A proposed power plant that would convert coal into hydrogen and fertilizer near the community of Tupman in Kern County has been granted a six month reprieve from the California Energy Commission. 

This week on Valley Writers Read we hear a story about how, during the Vietnam War, a Hmong family was lucky enough to get out of their homeland. The story describes how, for years, this Hmong family fled from soldiers, hid in jungles, crossed the Mekong River to Thailand, and finally emigrated to America. The story is by Joel Pickford and is read by Lor Lee.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we look at the topics of food, drought, farming, policing and beer. First, Lesley McClurg reports on animal welfare conditions in the state.  Later, KVPR's Jeffrey Hess reports on whether six months after Prop 47 crime has gone up.

In recent months, the valley's agriculture industry has been thrust into the national headlines, largely over the debate over how much water farmers use to grow crops. Critics say farmers use 80 percent of the water used by people in California. However farmers say that number is misleading, pointing out they actually use only 40 percent of the state's total water supply, where about 50 percent is set aside for environmental uses.

What do General William Tecumseh Sherman, the Greek god Zeus and Sir Lancelot all have in common? They've all lent their names to popular beers from local craft breweries. It turns out the San Joaquin Valley is in the midst of a craft beer boom, from Bakersfield to Turlock, making it one of the area’s hottest food and beverage trends. What's behind the explosive growth, and is there a definitive local style of beer?

Flickr user / Creative Commons

A proposed new ballot measure in California would tax bottled water sales. If backers gather enough signatures to put the initiative on the ballot, voters would be asked to place a tax of 5 cents per ounce on bottled water sold in the state. The measure would also require bottled water to contain a label identifying the product as “not drought friendly.”


For years, Google users have relied on the company's popular "Street View" technology to get a sidewalk level view of shops and restaurants. Now that concept is going vertical, with a unique 360-degree digital trek up Yosemite's El Capitan with some of the world's top climbers.