Joe Moore

Director of Program Content

Joe Moore is the Director of Program Content for Valley Public Radio. He supervises the station's news and music programming, website and radio operations, and is the host of the weekly program "Valley Edition." He is a native of Fresno and a graduate of California State University, Fresno. He has over 15 years of experience in all aspects of radio production, operations and management. Prior to joining Valley Public Radio in 2010 as the Director of Program Content, he spent six years as the station manager of KFSR, and taught audio production at Fresno State. In 2008 he was named one of Fresno's "40 Under 40" by the publication Business Street. Prior to joining Valley Public Radio, he was also active on the boards of several local non-profit organizations. His hobbies include photography, hiking and travel. Joe has a strong interest in local history and architecture, and is an avid baseball fan.

Ways to Connect

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

While the official broadcast season of Young Artists Spotlight doesn't begin until February 1st, this week FM89 listeners got a preview of what's to come, with a special performance by the University High School Chamber Choir. The group of 34 talented Fresno-area students joined us, along with conductor Greg Lapp to celebrate the start of FM89's January Membership Campaign. This performance marked two important firsts for the station.

California Endowment

New data from an on-going study about mortality rates in Central California reveals that alcohol, drugs and suicide are fueling significant increases in the mortality rate among white residents. The data are staggering: deaths from accidental drug poisoning in Fresno County are up over 200 percent since 1990, while suicides by hanging and strangulation are up over 120 percent in the region.

KMC / Kern County

The California State Senate’s health committee held a rare hearing in Bakersfield this afternoon discussing the local impact of President Elect Trump’s quest to repeal the Affordable Care Act. 

Kern County Supervisor Leticia Perez testified that while Kern Medical has seen its financial health improve in recent years, that could change quickly if the law is rolled back.

Courtesy of Alexander Mickelthwate

Alexander Mickelthwate is one of the six candidates hoping to become the next music director of the Fresno Philharmonic. He’s in town this week to lead the orchestra in a concert on Sunday at the Saroyan Theatre, featuring Berlioz’s Symphonie Fantastique; Mason Bates’ Mothership and Mozart’s Violin Concerto No 5.

Following recent high-profile suicides in Bakersfield and Fresno, many in the community are asking questions about how the community and the media should deal with the issue. In Bakersfield local community LGBT activist and CSUB student Jai Bornstein took her own life, as did newly-elected city councilmember Jeff Tcak. In Fresno County, three Clovis West High School students have taken their own lives in the last six months.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/mackenzie-mays-77053096

On this week's Valley Edition we are joined by the Fresno Bee's Education Reporter Mackenzie Mays. She covers Fresno Unified extensively and brings us an update on happenings in the district. To listen to the interview between VE Host Joe Moore and Mays click play above. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we start the show with a report from Ezra David Romero about how warming temperatures are making it hard for trees to get enough sleep. We also hear from KVPR's Jeffrey Hess about suicide prevention in the region. Bakersfield Californian Reporter Lois Henry also chimes in on the topic. Later in the program we are joined by Fresno Bee Reporter Mackenzie Mays for a conversation about Fresno Unified. We end the program with our latest installment of our podcast Outdoorsy. This time we go go underground. 

California High-Speed Rail Authority

It’s a new year, and that means a new chapter in the ongoing saga that is California’s high-speed rail project. While construction in the Fresno area is becoming more and more visible with every month, efforts to stop the project are also picking up steam in the courtroom. The center of the fight against the rail line is in Kings County, where a number of landowners and county supervisors have challenged the rail project in court, saying it violates the voter-approved Proposition 1A.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition Reporter Jeffrey Hess brings us a story about flooding that took place in the Bass Lake area from the most recent storm to come through the region. To tell us more about what to expect from future weather patterns we're joined by National Weather Service Meteorologist Scott Rowe based in Hanford. Later in the program we hear about how organic farming is changing in California. We also chat about high speed rail with Hanford Sentinel Reporter Seth Nidever.

Friant Water Authority

While a major “atmospheric river” storm system is expected to pummel Central California with historic amounts of rain and snow this weekend, there’s one place you won’t find floodwater: the Friant Kern Canal.

The Friant Water Authority says the 152 mile canal, that carries water from Millerton Lake on the San Joaquin River near Fresno all the way to Kern County has been shut down since late last year for maintenance and construction. 

This weekend’s storm could be good news for valley farmers, who hope they’ll be able to store some of the anticipated runoff.

Ara Azhderian is the water policy administrator for the San Luis & Delta-Mendota Water Authority, which represents 29 water contractors that use the San Luis Reservoir. He says the outlook for 2017 is already good.

It’s been over two years now since California voters approved Proposition 47, a measure which categorized many drug and property crimes from felonies to misdemeanors. It's led to a reduction in the state's prison population. But it's also led to other issues, like the many former felons who are now out of jail, but lacking support services to transition to freedom. That's the key finding from a new investigative report called Freed But Forgotten.

As California's drought continues to drag on, what's the weather outlook for 2017? Meteorologist Sean Boyd, who is a lecturer in Fresno State's Department of Geography and City & Regional Planning joins us today on Valley Edition to talk about La Nina, rain, snow and more. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we look back at some of the top stories that aired on our program in 2016. We'll learn about how residents devastated by the Erskine Fire are working to rebuild, how drought-ravaged East Porterville is beginning to make progress on brining running water to area homes, and much more. 

A lot has happened in Fresno in the last eight years under the leadership of mayor Ashley Swearengin, who leaves office next month. The city weathered a major economic storm, adopted a new general plan that attempts to rein in sprawl, removed the Fulton Mall, and started building major new water infrastructure. The city also added a police auditor, started construction on a bus rapid transit line and adopted a new development code.

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