Joe Moore

Director of Program Content

Joe Moore is the Director of Program Content for Valley Public Radio. He supervises the station's news and music programming, website and radio operations, and is the host of the weekly program "Valley Edition." He is a native of Fresno and a graduate of California State University, Fresno. He has over 15 years of experience in all aspects of radio production, operations and management. Prior to joining Valley Public Radio in 2010 as the Director of Program Content, he spent six years as the station manager of KFSR, and taught audio production at Fresno State. In 2008 he was named one of Fresno's "40 Under 40" by the publication Business Street. Prior to joining Valley Public Radio, he was also active on the boards of several local non-profit organizations. His hobbies include photography, hiking and travel. Joe has a strong interest in local history and architecture, and is an avid baseball fan.

Ways to Connect

Officials say the City of Fresno’s effort to step up code enforcement actions on slumlord property owners is showing results. The ASET  team - which targets landlords who don’t maintain their properties to health and safety codes - has thus far taken action on 13 properties throughout the city, with many more as potential targets. The city attempts to get owners to fix up their properties though warnings and fines, but can eventually take them to court.

Fresno County

The County of Fresno hopes to see more industrial park developments in its future. The Board of Supervisors voted today to ask county staff to explore possible sites for an industrial development of at least 1,000 acres that could be home to distribution centers, advanced manufacturing companies or other businesses. The county is considering sites in the vicinity of Highway 99 in the Fowler, Selma and Kingsburg area, as well as in the Malaga area southeast of the City of Fresno.

California High Speed Rail Authority

For a train that is supposed to be both fast and smooth, the quest to build high-speed rail in California has been anything but. Last week the project hit another issue – the surprise announcement from the rail authority’s CEO Jeff Morales that he is stepping down after five years on the job.

The Fresno Bee’s Tim Sheehan joined us on Valley Edition to talk about what his departure means for the project, as well as on-going efforts to select a site for the line’s heavy maintenance facility. 

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Today on Young Artist's Spotlight we feature a number of soloists and ensembles from the Tulare County Youth Orchestras.

Courtesy Evo Bluestein

Central California has a rich folk music tradition, which is being documented in a new book by Evo Bluestein. "The Road to Sweet’s Mill  -- Folk Music in the West during the 1960s and ’70s" comes out later this year and tells the story of the people and places behind the region's folk music sound, which flourished at Sierra music camp that gives the book its name, as well as other venues. Bluestein is also presenting a special concert to celebrate the new book taking place this Saturday at Fresno State's Whalberg Recital Hall.

Sean Work / The Californian / Reporting on Health Collaborative

A local politician is in hot water with his own party leaders after opposing the state’s new transportation funding plan. Bakersfield Assemblyman Rudy Salas has been stripped of his chairmanship of the State Assembly’s Business and Professions Committee by Speaker Anthony Rendon.

The Kern County Democrat was the only member of his party to vote against the transportation deal that would raise gas taxes and vehicle fees. Salas was removed from the committee entirely. In a tweet he said he was removed from the committee for keeping his commitment to voters.  

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is defending the Trump administration’s policies on public land. The secretary took his message Friday to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.  

Zinke says he came out west to reaffirm his commitment to federally managed lands, including national parks. He spoke with reporters at an event in Kings Canyon National Park, a day after meeting with California Governor Jerry Brown, one of the president’s harshest critics.

Gaelynn Lea

Gaelynn Lea of Duluth, Minnesota rose to national attention last year as winner of NPR’s Tiny Desk Contest. Listeners from across the country submitted their recordings to NPR Music with hopes of winning a spot on the national broadcast. Despite thousands of other entries, Lea was the unanimous choice of the judges, with a unique style combining traditional fiddle music with contemporary electronic loops, as well as an inspiring story.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our team reports stories about subsidence, how fear about the Affordable Care Act ending is harming some health professionals. KVPR Reporter Jeffrey Hess interviews UCLA Health Policy Professor Arturo Vargas Bustamante about the future of Obamacare. We also hear from CSUB President Horace Mitchell about happenings at the university. Ending the show we are joined by NPR Tiny Desk Concert winner Gaelynn Lea. She's performing in Fresno at Bitwise Industries Thursday night at 7 p.m.

CSUB

The CSUB Roadrunners are about to go running far from Kern County. Later today the school's men’s basketball team will take its game to the hallowed floor of New York’s Madison Square Garden for a spot in the final four of the NIT basketball tournament, playing Georgia Tech. It's a big moment on the national stage for CSUB. We talked with university president Horace Mitchell about the mood on campus, as well as last week's vote of the CSU Board of Trustees authorizing a raise in tuition. We also talked about new campus efforts to help students struggling with hunger and homelessness.

Kern Pioneer Village

It might be the most famous boxcar in Kern County, if not the entire state of California. The childhood home of the late country music star Merle Haggard is no longer in Oildale, where it sat for decades – it’s now at the Kern Pioneer Village near the end of a two year-long restoration. The  museum is throwing a party to celebrate the completion of the project April 9th called the Haggard Boxcar Festival.

There some new developments in the unfolding story of alleged misuse of a confidential law enforcement database by members of the Kern High School Police Department and administration. Last week KHSD Police Chief Joe Lopeteguy, who is now on leave from his position, filed a lawsuit against the district. In it he claims that the district retaliated against him for acting as a whistleblower by exposing the district's alleged misuse of the system to investigate students and employees.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our reporters talk about how Trump's budget cuts could impact the region and how rangers in Yosemite National Park are using technology to save bears. We also hear from FM89's Kerry Klein about the GOP's plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act. She interviews Stanford Law Professor Lanhee Chen on the topic. Later we hear from the Bakersfield Californian's Harold Pierce about a lawsuit involving misconduct in the Kern High School District. Ending the program we hear all about the Haggard Boxcar Fest in Bakersfield held April 6.

Courtesy Rei Hotoda

The Fresno Philharmonic welcomes its fifth candidate for the vacant position of music director and conductor to the community this week with Rei Hotoda, who leads the orchestra in a concert Sunday at the Saroyan Theatre featuring Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5, Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 5 and a contemporary piece by Pulitzer-prize winning Chinese-American composer Zhou Long. Rei Hotoda is currently the Associate Conductor Utah Symphony. She has a doctorate in piano performance from USC and also studied at both Peabody and Eastman.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our reporters tell stories about gold prospecting and new warehouse distribution centers in the region. We also hear from Anthony Wright with Health Access California about what repealing the Affordable Care Act could mean for Californians. Later we hear from Assemblyman Rudy Salas about legislation he's forming around Valley Fever. Plus we speak with Fresno City Council member Clint Olivier about how Fresno needs to do more for seniors.

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