Valley Public Radio - Live Audio

Joe Moore

Director of Program Content

Joe Moore is the Director of Program Content for Valley Public Radio. He supervises the station's news and music programming, website and radio operations, and is the host of the weekly program "Valley Edition." He is a native of Fresno and a graduate of California State University, Fresno. He has over 15 years of experience in all aspects of radio production, operations and management. Prior to joining Valley Public Radio in 2010 as the Director of Program Content, he spent six years as the station manager of KFSR, and taught audio production at Fresno State. In 2008 he was named one of Fresno's "40 Under 40" by the publication Business Street. Prior to joining Valley Public Radio, he was also active on the boards of several local non-profit organizations. His hobbies include photography, hiking and travel. Joe has a strong interest in local history and architecture, and is an avid baseball fan.

Ways to Connect

From a film about legendary Gypsy-jazz star Django Reinhardt to a documentary about police and the Oakland community, organizers of the 13th annual Fresno Film Festival say the event has something for everyone. It takes place November 10th - 12th at the historic Tower Theatre. This week on Valley Edition, we spoke with Fresno Filmworks board member Justus Bier Stanberry about this year's event. 

This week on Valley Edition we hear an in-depth report about a number of changes in the works that could bring new life to a long struggling valley neighborhood - southwest Fresno. We also learn why changes are in store for the City of Fresno's FAX bus service that could improve service for some at the cost of others. We also go in-depth with interviews on the issue of human trafficking in Fresno with two reporters from the Fresno Bee, and learn about efforts to reduce cyclist and pedestrian fatalities in Kern County with Vision Zero Kern. 

Vision Zero Kern Facebook page

According to a new report from the City of Bakersfield, 64 pedestrians and cyclists have been killed in accidents in the city in the last three and a half years. The new bicycle and pedestrian safety report says only around a quarter of those accidents were the fault of drivers. However, some say the number of deaths in the area is much larger, as the city's report doesn't count accidents that occurred in county islands.

Aleksandra Appleton / The Fresno Bee

A new reporting project from the Fresno Bee seeks to shine a light on a story that is too often in the shadows all around us – human trafficking. The multi-media project "Slaves of the Sex Trade" launched last week, and underscores not only the extent of the problem but the ways in which many young women are lured into a life of modern day slavery, usually beginning online.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

The Kern County Board of Supervisors is set to review a proposal Tuesday from local economic development officials that would lift existing caps on tax rebates, and bring new jobs to the county.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our team reports stories on a potential teacher's strike within Fresno Unified as well as what farmers may do if a popular pesticide is restricted. We also hear about a new program in Tulare County being implemented to hopefully reduce the number of domestic violence cases in the area. Later we hear from The Fresno Bee's Jim Boren who announced this week that he's retiring at the end of the year.

TRMC

Last week a bankruptcy court judge allowed the Tulare Local Health Care District board to part ways with HCCA, the private company that has been running the Tulare Regional Medical Center for several years. It marks an end to a relationship that had become bitter following a recall election earlier this year. It also has led to the temporary closure of the hospital, which has directed patients to nearby facilities in Porterville, Visalia and Reedley. So what's next, and when does the hospital hope to reopen?

The Fresno Bee

The Fresno Bee’s executive editor Jim Boren announced on Monday that he plans to retire in January. In his 48 year career he’s covered countless stories – from the Chowchilla school bus kidnapping to the Operation Rezone scandal at Fresno City Hall. Prior to his current position, he helped lead the paper’s coverage of local politics, and served as editor of the editorial page. He joined us on Valley Edition to talk about his career, serving as a juror for the Pulitzer Prize in 2016 and 2017, and about some local political issues.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

A new proposal from the National Park Service would result in a big hike in Yosemite National Park entrance fees during the popular summer months. Under the proposal, which also applies to 16 other parks including Sequoia & Kings Canyon, the entrance fee between May first and September 30 would be $70 per vehicle, $50 per motorcycle, and $30 per person. The funds would be used to improve facilities, infrastructure, and visitor services, with an emphasis on deferred maintenance projects.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Last week oil industry giant Chevron announced it would cut around 26 percent of the workforce in its San Joaquin Valley Business Unit. That's the part of the company that produces oil from fields in Kern and Fresno Counties. It's not the first big job cut in the industry but it could hurt the local economy, especially in Bakersfield. But is this latest news the result of low oil prices, or other factors?

Joe Moore / KVPR

Thousands gathered this weekend for a festival to mark the reopening of six blocks of Fulton Street that once made up the pedestrian-only Fulton Mall. The multi-million dollar reconstruction project was one of the most controversial in recent local memory, with critics on all sides. Some claim the new street won’t help revitalize the area, at the same time as others say it will cause gentrification, driving away existing businesses that cater to the largely Latino shoppers who never left downtown.

Valley Public Radio

On this week's Valley Edition we start the program with a segment on Fresno's new Fulton Street, which until recently was a pedestrian mall. Our team interviews a number of people about their thoughts on the project. We also learn about a program at Reedley College called a human library with a goal of broadening understanding of cultures and issues. Later we hear from Lois Henry, formerly a columnist with the Bakersfield Californian, about the loss of oil industry jobs in Kern County. And ending the program we air our latest episode of Outdoorsy with a focus on mountain biking. 

When he died in a tragic bicycle crash in 2015, Ed Lund left a void in both the city's art and cycling communities. Ed was a gifted artist, worked with students at Fresno State and was a passionate cyclist. He died while competing in a road rally in Sonoma organized by cycling great Levi Leipheimer, the GranFondo. Now Ed's friends and family are organizing a rally of their own in Ed's memory.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our team reports on insurance premiums going up in fire zones and about two possible violations of the Brown Act in the region. We also hear from Craig Scharton, with the Downtown Fresno Partnership, about the reopening of Fresno's Fulton Mall as Fulton Street. Later FM89's Ezra David Romero takes a ride on the Yosemite Mountain Sugar Pine Railroad that was almost lost in the Railroad Fire in September. Ending the program we hear about a rally in memory of Fresno artist, curator and cyclist Ed Lund. 

For 53 years downtown Fresno's main street was a car-free zone. But after a year and a half of construction, the six-block long Fulton Mall has been removed, and replaced by Fulton Street. Backers hope the project will kick off a wave of investment and revitalization in the area. But critics abound, with some saying it won't work, and others saying it will displace existing businesses and residents, and will set off a wave of gentrification. Others still say despite the new streetscape, nothing really will change.

Pages