Ira Flatow

NPR science correspondent and award-winning journalist Ira Flatow is the host of Science Friday. He anchors the show each Friday, bringing listeners a lively, informative discussion on science, technology, health, space and the environment.

Flatow's interest in things scientific began in boyhood — he almost burned down his mother's bathroom trying to recreate a biology class experiment. "I was the proverbial kid who spent hours in the basement experimenting with electronic gizmos, and then entering them in high school science fairs," Flatow says.

He has shared that enthusiasm with public radio listeners for more than 35 years. As NPR's science correspondent from 1971 to 1986, Flatow found himself reporting from the Kennedy Space Center, Three Mile Island, Antarctica and the South Pole. In one memorable NPR report, Flatow took former All Things Considered host Susan Stamberg into a closet to crunch Wint-O-Green Lifesavers, proving they spark in the dark.

His most recent book is Present At The Future: From Evolution to Nanotechnology, Candid and Controversial Conversations on Science And Nature. It follows on the heels of They All Laughed...From Light Bulbs to Lasers: The Fascinating Stories Behind the Great Inventions That Have Changed Our Lives.

His honors include the Isaac Asimov Science Award, the National Science Teachers Association Faraday Science Communicator Award, the National Science Board Public Service Award, World Economic Forum Media Fellowship, AAAS Journalism Award, Brady Washburn Award, and the Carl Sagan Award.

Flatow is member of the National Association of Science Writers and AFTRA.

Digital Life
9:13 am
Thu March 2, 2006

Using Teamwork to Crack the Enigma Code

Transcript

NOAH ADAMS, host:

From NPR News, this DAY TO DAY. A message from World War II encoded by the infamous Nazi Enigma machine has finally been cracked. It's one of three such messages left over from the war that has never been read until now. The code-breaking was pulled off by a vast team of computers working together by way of the Internet. And here to tell us how this was done is Ira Flatow, host of Science Friday, a regular Thursday contributor to DAY TO DAY.

First of all, what, Ira, does the message say?

IRA FLATOW reporting:

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