Ezra David Romero

Reporter and Producer

Ezra David Romero is an award-winning radio reporter and producer. His stories have run on Morning Edition, Morning Edition Saturday, Morning Edition Sunday, All Things Considered, Here & Now, The Salt, Latino USA, KQED, KALW, Harvest Public Radio, etc.

Romero has worked with Valley Public Radio for just under three years. He landed at KVPR after interning with Al Jazeera English during the 2012 presidential election. His series ‘Voices of the Drought’ using the hashtag #droughtvoices has garnered over 1 million impressions on Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. It's also resulted in two photography exhibits and a touring pop-up gallery traveling across California. Stories affiliated with #droughtvoices have run locally, statewide and on national air.  In January he was awarded a Golden Mike Award from the Radio & Television News Association for Southern California for this series. He beat out some of the largest radio stations in the state.

In 2015 he was awarded a first place radio award by the Fresno County Farm Bureau for a piece on the nation’s first agricultural hackathon.

In early 2015, he was awarded two prestigious Golden Mike Awards through the RTNA of Southern California for a piece on budding tech in Central California and a story on Spanish theater. Valley Edition, the show Romero produces, was named for the best Public Affairs Program for 2013 by the RTNDA of Northern California. 

He’s a graduate of California State University Fresno, where he studied journalism (digital media) and geography. He has worked for the Fresno Bee covering police, elections, government and higher education. In 2012 he was a Gruner Award finalist for his 13-part Sanger Herald series on obesity in Sanger, Calif. 

In his spare time, Romero hikes the Sierra Nevada, takes road trips to the Pacific Coast and frequently visits ice cream shops.

Ways to Connect

Ezra David Romero

Let's face it. America loves giant sequoia trees. Native Americans believe they hold spiritual value, early settlers tried to exploit the trees and today the trees adorn the National Park Service's badge. 

In a new book called "King Sequoia: The Tree That Inspired a Nation, Created Our National Park System, and Changed the Way We Think about Nature" author William C. Tweed weaves together a narrative of human contact with the big trees. He outlines who tried to exploit them and eventually what it took to protect them. 

Curtain 5 Theatre Group

A Pulitzer prize winning play performed by local actors opens this week in Fresno. The Gin Game, written by D.L. Coburn and produced locally by Curtain 5 Theatre Group, runs Friday Nov. 11 through November 20 at the Fresno Art Museum.

Fresno Filmworks

Eight films from places around the globe will play this weekend at the Fresno Film Festival. Think Palestinian race car drivers, an adaption of Heidi and a documentary all about Yo-Yo Ma. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition FM89's Ezra David Romero hosts the program. Beginning the show we hear from Covered California Executive Director Peter Lee about what open enrollment means for the region. We also hear from William Tweed, the author of a new book called "King Sequoia," about our human relationship with the giant sequoias.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

The reality of aging is a hard pill to swallow for anyone, but for the LGBT population in rural places it can be an even rougher experience. And as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports getting older for LGBT seniors in Central California often means going back into the closet.

 

Early this year Van Vanlandingham had surgery.  For almost three months the 68-year-old rehabilitated in a nursing home in the South Valley town of Lindsay.  The staff kept asking him what was his wife's name.

The Wildlands Consservancy

The thousands of drivers that make their way up the Grapevine on Interstate 5 every day probably have little idea they’re passing through one of the most diverse ecological regions of the state.

 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our team reports on domestic violence in Fresno County as well as aging in rural California for LGBT people. Later in the program we are joined by Fresno Bee education reporter Mackenzie Mays. She speaks about the issue of discrimination at University High School in Fresno. We end the program by hearing from Dan York with the Wildlands Conservancy about the Wind Wolves Preserve in the South Valley. 

Paul Marek, Virginia Tech

A new creepy crawly critter has been found in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports.

 

The long white millipede has 414 legs, 200 poison glands and four penises. The Illacme tobini (ill-ack-me toe-bin-i) millipede is named after National Park Service Biologist Ben Tobin. It was found in a cave near Sequoia and King Canyon’s only public cave called Crystal Cave.

Valley Public Radio

This week on our two hour Valley Edition we hear stories about reducing child abuse in Fresno County and making the city safer for pedestrians. We also hear from Fresno mayoral candidate Lee Brand and his vision for the city.  Later we are joined by Fresno State political science professor Jeff Cummins. He and VE host Joe Moore chat about local races ahead of the November election.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Californians will vote in a couple weeks on whether or not the recreational use of marijuana should be legalized or not. And as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports one Central California city is looking at how it can cash in on this green revolution.

Patrick Keough wanted out of Coalinga about five years ago. The 18,000 people or so that call this town in the hills of the coastal range home couldn’t support his realty company.

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