Ezra David Romero

Reporter and Producer

Ezra David Romero is an award-winning radio reporter and producer. His stories have run on Morning Edition, Morning Edition Saturday, Morning Edition Sunday, All Things Considered, Here & Now, The Salt, Latino USA, KQED, KALW, Harvest Public Radio, etc.

Romero has worked with Valley Public Radio for just under three years. He landed at KVPR after interning with Al Jazeera English during the 2012 presidential election. His series ‘Voices of the Drought’ using the hashtag #droughtvoices has garnered over 1 million impressions on Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. It's also resulted in two photography exhibits and a touring pop-up gallery traveling across California. Stories affiliated with #droughtvoices have run locally, statewide and on national air.  In January he was awarded a Golden Mike Award from the Radio & Television News Association for Southern California for this series. He beat out some of the largest radio stations in the state.

In 2015 he was awarded a first place radio award by the Fresno County Farm Bureau for a piece on the nation’s first agricultural hackathon.

In early 2015, he was awarded two prestigious Golden Mike Awards through the RTNA of Southern California for a piece on budding tech in Central California and a story on Spanish theater. Valley Edition, the show Romero produces, was named for the best Public Affairs Program for 2013 by the RTNDA of Northern California. 

He’s a graduate of California State University Fresno, where he studied journalism (digital media) and geography. He has worked for the Fresno Bee covering police, elections, government and higher education. In 2012 he was a Gruner Award finalist for his 13-part Sanger Herald series on obesity in Sanger, Calif. 

In his spare time, Romero hikes the Sierra Nevada, takes road trips to the Pacific Coast and frequently visits ice cream shops.

Ways to Connect

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our team reports stories on how Madera County is dealing with ICE working in the county, drone racing and how crops are faring with all the rain. FM89 Reporter Jeffrey Hess interviews  Fresno County Department of Public Health Director David Pomaville about what the county is doing to investigate lead levels in children. We also chat Hanford Sentinel Reporter Seth Nidever about how Hanford is reacting to medical marijuana companies would like to set up shop in the city. Plus we’ll talk with Valley Musician Omar Nare.

Fresno Arts Council

For the fourth year the Fresno Arts Council is marrying art and agriculture into a show. The 2017 Arts Alive in Agriculture Showcase will be made up of local artists.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our reporters take a look at what Congressman Devin Nunes' future looks like and how inmate visitations are going online in the region. We also hear from Capital Public Radio's Ben Adler about what Governor Jerry Brown's proposed transportation deal could mean for the state. Later, KVPR Reporter Kerry Klein interviews two speakers from the Syrian Refugee Symposium taking place at Fresno State Tuesday April 4.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Gov. Jerry Brown and Democratic leaders have a huge challenge this week: Convince all but one Democrat in the California Legislature to vote for new fuel tax increases and vehicle fees to repair the state's crumbling roads and highways, an incredibly unpopular vote.

To tell us more about the deal Capital Public Radio's Ben Adler joined KVPR's Ezra David Romero on Valley Edition. Take a listen to the interview below.

Drivers in Fresno are expressing a largely negative view about the tax. Among them is truck driver Abraham Baec.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

A new map released by NASA earlier this year shows that large portions of California are sinking. The worst of it is in the San Joaquin Valley. One of the main reasons is the over pumping of groundwater, especially in the last five years of drought.

All that sinking and all the snow melting in the Sierra has Central Valley water managers like Dustin Fuller worried.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our team reports stories about subsidence, how fear about the Affordable Care Act ending is harming some health professionals. KVPR Reporter Jeffrey Hess interviews UCLA Health Policy Professor Arturo Vargas Bustamante about the future of Obamacare. We also hear from CSUB President Horace Mitchell about happenings at the university. Ending the show we are joined by NPR Tiny Desk Concert winner Gaelynn Lea. She's performing in Fresno at Bitwise Industries Thursday night at 7 p.m.

Kimberly Vardeman/Flickr / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode

In 2014 the California cotton industry got a wake up call. Somewhere in the supply chain of turning high end cotton into fabric the products were being laced with inferior fiber. And now as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports consumers can be sure they’re getting what they pay for.

 

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

People love seeing black bears when they visit places like Yosemite National Park. They’re powerful creatures that can be docile or ferocious depending on the encounter. In such a highly visited place incidents with bears are bound to happen, and as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports the park has come up with a new plan to keep bears and people safe.

 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our reporters talk about how Trump's budget cuts could impact the region and how rangers in Yosemite National Park are using technology to save bears. We also hear from FM89's Kerry Klein about the GOP's plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act. She interviews Stanford Law Professor Lanhee Chen on the topic. Later we hear from the Bakersfield Californian's Harold Pierce about a lawsuit involving misconduct in the Kern High School District. Ending the program we hear all about the Haggard Boxcar Fest in Bakersfield held April 6.

Joe Moore / Valley Public Radio

Two new reports out this week examine California’s oil fields and how the high-emitting oil extracted from many of them poses a threat to the environment and human health. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports that one of them is in Kern County.

 

NASA/Friant Water Authority

A new way to measure the snowpack from the sky is getting some positive results. FM89's Ezra David Romero reports officials hope new technology can reduce the risk of downstream flooding.

 

At the start of the year NASA crews began flying over the San Joaquin River watershed to measure the snowpack using laser pulses. This creates a way more accurate estimate of how much snow is the mountains than traditional snow surveying does.

 

National Geographic

The new documentary "Water & Power: A California Heist" takes a look at past and current water wars in California. It's told through the eyes of Valley voices like journalist Mark Arax and Bakersfield Californian Columnist Lois Henry. 

"This is a very serious issue," says the films director Marina Zenovich. "We show people in the film with wells going dry. One of our characters says watch out. You could be next."

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our reporters tell stories about gold prospecting and new warehouse distribution centers in the region. We also hear from Anthony Wright with Health Access California about what repealing the Affordable Care Act could mean for Californians. Later we hear from Assemblyman Rudy Salas about legislation he's forming around Valley Fever. Plus we speak with Fresno City Council member Clint Olivier about how Fresno needs to do more for seniors.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

All of the recent rain and snow in California is good news for farms and cities. The runoff flowing from the Sierra Nevada is so strong this year that’s it's moving huge boulders and tons of earth down rivers. That means gold is on the move as well and as Valley Public Radio’s Ezra David Romero reports that has gold prospectors on alert.

 

Larry Riggs and his friends are hunting on a piece of private property near Oakhurst. There are no guns or fishing poles present. Just shovels, plastic bowls and buckets.

They’re panning for gold.

Dan Hatton/Creative Commons/Flickr / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/legalcode

The University of California is urging poultry farms and people with backyard chickens to pay attention for signs of a sickness their flocks can catch from wild birds. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports.

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