Ezra David Romero

Reporter and Producer

Ezra David Romero is an award-winning radio reporter and producer. His stories have run on Morning Edition, Morning Edition Saturday, Morning Edition Sunday, All Things Considered, Here & Now, The Salt, Latino USA, KQED, KALW, Harvest Public Radio, etc.

Romero has worked with Valley Public Radio for just under three years. He landed at KVPR after interning with Al Jazeera English during the 2012 presidential election. His series ‘Voices of the Drought’ using the hashtag #droughtvoices has garnered over 1 million impressions on Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. It's also resulted in two photography exhibits and a touring pop-up gallery traveling across California. Stories affiliated with #droughtvoices have run locally, statewide and on national air.  In January he was awarded a Golden Mike Award from the Radio & Television News Association for Southern California for this series. He beat out some of the largest radio stations in the state.

In 2015 he was awarded a first place radio award by the Fresno County Farm Bureau for a piece on the nation’s first agricultural hackathon.

In early 2015, he was awarded two prestigious Golden Mike Awards through the RTNA of Southern California for a piece on budding tech in Central California and a story on Spanish theater. Valley Edition, the show Romero produces, was named for the best Public Affairs Program for 2013 by the RTNDA of Northern California. 

He’s a graduate of California State University Fresno, where he studied journalism (digital media) and geography. He has worked for the Fresno Bee covering police, elections, government and higher education. In 2012 he was a Gruner Award finalist for his 13-part Sanger Herald series on obesity in Sanger, Calif. 

In his spare time, Romero hikes the Sierra Nevada, takes road trips to the Pacific Coast and frequently visits ice cream shops.

Ways to Connect

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Plans for a new dam on the San Joaquin River above Millerton Lake are on a collision course with a new proposal from the Bureau of Land Management to designate a portion of the area as a “Wild and Scenic River.” Conservationists say it would save some rare land values while improving public access, but supporters of the dam say the designation would essentially kill the project. What does the incoming Trump administration mean for the reservoir? FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports.

 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition FM89's Ezra David Romero reports on the tension over a reservoir project that some desire fro the region. It's called Temperance Flat. We also hear from the editor of The Dessert Sun about proposition 47. That's the ballot initiative  Californians voted for to allow certain drug possession felonies to be switched to misdemeanors. We also hear from Emily Bazar about her latest "Ask Emily" columns. Ending the program we are joined by Meteorologist Sean Body to chat about the upcoming rainy season. 

Elton Morris / Creative Commons: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/legalcode

The United States Department of Agriculture published a final rule Tuesday to allow lemons from Argentina into the country. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports this decision has the California lemon industry on edge.

 

This announcement doesn’t sit well with the $650 million dollar US lemon industry. California Citrus Mutual President Joel Nelson says the citrus industry as whole is afraid of pests making into the country.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we learn about how valley fever once harmed prisoners throughout the region, KVPR Reporter Kerry Klein has that story. Later we hear from KVPR's Jeffrey Hess about the state of Kern County libraries. FM89 Reporters Ezra David Romero and Kerry Klein team up to report on the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District's new plan to curb PM2.5 emissions. Also in the show we hear from locals about what Mayor Ashley Swearengin did and didn't do well in her eight years in office.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

After years of clean-up efforts and some notable progress, air in the San Joaquin Valley is still among the worst in the nation. Now there’s a new goal for cleaning up particulate pollution  from things that create dust and exhaust. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports the effort has reached a new phase thanks to intervention from the state.  

Ezra David Romero

We all like to find ways to focus on leading healthy lifestyles. We search out healthy foods, join the gym, and want to breathe clean air. But what about health of the soil that grows our food? As FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports, some valley farmers are turning to cleaning soil in an effort to use less water and to help clean air.

Fifteen years ago tractors could be heard at Sano Farms near Firebaugh on any given day. Now the sound of tractors is rare.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we are joined by McClatchy Reporter Michael Doyle to talk about water in California and what the new presidential administration means for California water. FM89's Jeffrey Hess reports on the possibility of ICE in Fresno County Jail. Later KVPR's Ezra David Romero reports on the importance of soil when it comes to air quality. We also here about a program to provide WiFi to the community of Lindsay by FM89's Kerry Klein.

http://tularecounty.ca.gov/emergencies/index.cfm/drought/drought-effects-status-updates/2016/november/week-of-november-28-2016/

Tulare County is perhaps the hardest hit region of the state when it comes to drought. Today there are almost 600 dry domestic wells in the county alone. Now the board of supervisors there is considering whether the county needs an emergency groundwater ordinance to help stop wells from going dry.

 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we are joined by CVObserver contributor George Hostetter. He chats with VE host Joe Moore about what Fresno Mayor-elect Lee Brand's time as mayor could look like. KVPR Reporter Jeffrey chats about the future of oil in Kern County.

Ken Lund / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/legalcode

A new study calls for more freshwater to make it from Valley rivers all the way to the San Francisco Bay Delta. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports.

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The Bay Institute found that flows from Central Valley rivers into the bay is less than half of what it could be if river diversions weren’t in play. Bay Institute Scientist Jon Rosenfield says these water diversions for agriculture and cities has serious ramifications for marine ecosystems.

 

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