Ezra David Romero

Reporter and Producer

Ezra David Romero is an award-winning radio reporter and producer. His stories have run on Morning Edition, Morning Edition Saturday, Morning Edition Sunday, All Things Considered, Here & Now, The Salt, Latino USA, KQED, KALW, Harvest Public Radio, etc.

Romero has worked with Valley Public Radio for just under three years. He landed at KVPR after interning with Al Jazeera English during the 2012 presidential election. His series ‘Voices of the Drought’ using the hashtag #droughtvoices has garnered over 1 million impressions on Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. It's also resulted in two photography exhibits and a touring pop-up gallery traveling across California. Stories affiliated with #droughtvoices have run locally, statewide and on national air.  In January he was awarded a Golden Mike Award from the Radio & Television News Association for Southern California for this series. He beat out some of the largest radio stations in the state.

In 2015 he was awarded a first place radio award by the Fresno County Farm Bureau for a piece on the nation’s first agricultural hackathon.

In early 2015, he was awarded two prestigious Golden Mike Awards through the RTNA of Southern California for a piece on budding tech in Central California and a story on Spanish theater. Valley Edition, the show Romero produces, was named for the best Public Affairs Program for 2013 by the RTNDA of Northern California. 

He’s a graduate of California State University Fresno, where he studied journalism (digital media) and geography. He has worked for the Fresno Bee covering police, elections, government and higher education. In 2012 he was a Gruner Award finalist for his 13-part Sanger Herald series on obesity in Sanger, Calif. 

In his spare time, Romero hikes the Sierra Nevada, takes road trips to the Pacific Coast and frequently visits ice cream shops.

Ways to Connect

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

UC Merced isn’t the first place people think of when it comes to finding new ways to prevent the spread of HIV globally. But thanks to one professor the university is now working with scientists around the globe to find an alternative way to prevent the virus from infecting people.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our team reports on two medical schools possibly coming to the region and about HIV prevention research underway at UC Merced. We also hear from YouTube famous doctor Zubin Damania, MD or ZDoggMD who grew up in Clovis.

Faces of Fracking / Flickr

A series of hearings began today in Kern County in a lawsuit over an ordinance that could allow up to 70,000 new oil and gas wells there over the next two decades.

 

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Wilderness areas are known for isolated beauty and the feeling of peace experienced there. There are no cars, few roads and only horseman, horses and hikers can enter them. But that could soon change if a bill that’s now in congress becomes law.

When Craig Bowden isn’t teaching eighth graders language arts he’s out riding his mountain bike. Today, he’s giving me a lesson on bike riding at Woodward Park in north Fresno.  

“When you’re taking a corner you typically want to have your outside foot down, so the pressures on the outside,” Bowden says as we ride down a hill.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our team reports about a bill that if becomes law would allow bikes in wilderness areas and about Medi-Cal Rates in the Valley.  Later we hear from the LA Times' Ivan Penn about his story on a Central Valley power plant shutting down. We also hear about a new book that documents farmworkers' oral histories. And ending the program we learn more about the new Fresno Philharmonic conductor. 

Tioga Pass Resort

One of the oldest and most popular resorts in the Yosemite highlands might not open at all this year due damage from winter weather.

 

Significant damage to the lodge building at Tioga Pass Resort east of Yosemite National Park was discovered this week.   

 

Dave Levy, the resort's general manager, blames the huge snow year.  He says more than 800 inches fell here this winter. That’s more than 60 feet of snow.

 

After five years at Cal State Monterey Bay, CSU Summer Arts is back at Fresno State starting June 25. This month of lectures and performances draws people from around the country including the cinematographer who blew up the the Death Star in the original "Star Wars" movie. A Brooklyn-based group that uses dance to address social and political issues will also spend the month here. 

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

This is the third installment in our series Contaminated, in which we explore the 300 California communities that lack access to clean drinking water. When we began the series, we introduced you to the community of Lanare, which has arsenic-tainted water while a treatment plant in the center of town sits idle. 

Today, we return to Lanare to learn why infrastructure projects aren’t always enough, and how Sacramento is trying to ensure Lanare never happens again.

Valley Public Radio

On this week's show our reporters return to the Fresno County community of Lanare for our series "Contaminated." We also hear Reporter Jeffrey Hess interview Fresno Mayor Lee Brand on an Amazon distribution center coming to Fresno. Later we hear from Tuolumne Winter Rangers Rob and Laura Pilewski talk about the extreme weather conditions this year and what it's like to spend the winter in isolation. Scripps National Spelling Bee Winner Ananya Vinay also joins the program. And ending the show we learn all about the CSU Summer Arts program coming to Fresno State this summer.

theovationtheatre.com

Bakersfield has a new stage for actors to perform on. And its first show, "Jesus Christ Superstar," opens June 2.

The new space in the downtown Bakersfield arts district is called The Ovation Repertory Theatre. Its owned by Adam Cline, Hal Friedman and Bien Resolme. Friedman joined Valley edition Tuesday May 30 to tell us more about the opening and upcoming shows. To listen to the interview click play above.  

Courtesy Electronic Frontier Foundation

The Kern High School District launched nine internal investigations in 2016 for inappropriate use of the California Law Enforcement Telecommunications System.

Valley Public Radio

In this week's Valley Edition our team reports stories on ambulance abusers, bees and California missions. We also hear from Bakersfield Californian Report Harold Pierce on happenings in Kern County. Later KVPR Reporter Kerry Klein tells us more about the Be Public Live event she'll be hosting Thursday June 1 all about the doctors shortage in the region. Ending the program we hear from Hal Friedman about a new show in Kern County at the Ovation Repertory Theatre. 

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Spring is here and it’s the perfect time to get outdoors. There are, of course, lots of fun things to do outside this time of year, but one sport is attracting locals specifically to rock faces everywhere.

Ezra David Romero
Valley Public Radio

Understanding the information on a voting ballot can be tough even for English speakers. For many second language learners the voting process can be so intimidating that they don’t vote, in part because of the lack of materials in their own language.

Now a group of Punjabi people in Fresno want to change that experience.

Almost every afternoon older Indian-American men from the province of Punjab gather under the shade and play cards in Victoria West Community Park in West Fresno. Deep Singh says it’s a chance to get out of the house.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our team reports stories on child care, chronic diseases and the Punjabi language. We also hear from Laura Rosenthal with CALmatters on President Donald Trump's relationship with Rep. Kevin McCarthy. Ending the program you'll hear our latest episode of Outdoorsy. This time we talk all about rock climbing.

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