Ezra David Romero

Reporter and Producer

Ezra David Romero is an award-winning radio reporter and producer. His stories have run on Morning Edition, Morning Edition Saturday, Morning Edition Sunday, All Things Considered, Here & Now, The Salt, Latino USA, KQED, KALW, Harvest Public Radio, etc.

Romero has worked with Valley Public Radio for just under three years. He landed at KVPR after interning with Al Jazeera English during the 2012 presidential election. His series ‘Voices of the Drought’ using the hashtag #droughtvoices has garnered over 1 million impressions on Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. It's also resulted in two photography exhibits and a touring pop-up gallery traveling across California. Stories affiliated with #droughtvoices have run locally, statewide and on national air.  In January he was awarded a Golden Mike Award from the Radio & Television News Association for Southern California for this series. He beat out some of the largest radio stations in the state.

In 2015 he was awarded a first place radio award by the Fresno County Farm Bureau for a piece on the nation’s first agricultural hackathon.

In early 2015, he was awarded two prestigious Golden Mike Awards through the RTNA of Southern California for a piece on budding tech in Central California and a story on Spanish theater. Valley Edition, the show Romero produces, was named for the best Public Affairs Program for 2013 by the RTNDA of Northern California. 

He’s a graduate of California State University Fresno, where he studied journalism (digital media) and geography. He has worked for the Fresno Bee covering police, elections, government and higher education. In 2012 he was a Gruner Award finalist for his 13-part Sanger Herald series on obesity in Sanger, Calif. 

In his spare time, Romero hikes the Sierra Nevada, takes road trips to the Pacific Coast and frequently visits ice cream shops.

Ways to Connect

Valley Public Radio

This week on our two hour Valley Edition we hear stories about reducing child abuse in Fresno County and making the city safer for pedestrians. We also hear from Fresno mayoral candidate Lee Brand and his vision for the city.  Later we are joined by Fresno State political science professor Jeff Cummins. He and VE host Joe Moore chat about local races ahead of the November election.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

Californians will vote in a couple weeks on whether or not the recreational use of marijuana should be legalized or not. And as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports one Central California city is looking at how it can cash in on this green revolution.

Patrick Keough wanted out of Coalinga about five years ago. The 18,000 people or so that call this town in the hills of the coastal range home couldn’t support his realty company.

Valley Public Radio

In this week 's two hour Valley Edition FM89's Ezra David Romero takes a tour of a prison that could soon be a pot farm in Coalinga. KVPR's Jeffrey Hess reports on how work has begun to craft a new Fresno parks master plan. We also here from Fresno County Supervisor Henry Perea on why he should be Fresno's next mayor. Later in the program we hear from Bakersfield Mayoral Candidate Karen Goh. We are also joined by Fresno State Political Science Professor Thomas Holyoke to chat about the propositions on the November ballot. Enjoy!

Tim Olson / Flickr

In our last episode we took you to this mountain oasis called Mineral King in Sequoia National Park. This time, we go 100 miles north of there  to a place called Mono Hot Springs.

Mono (pronounced “MOE-no”) Hot Springs is tucked away in the Sierra Nevada south of Yosemite National Park and Mammoth Lakes, and it’s about halfway from the Valley to the East Side. The hot springs sit in a mountain valley next to a fork in the San Joaquin River.

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

This year Yosemite National Park is on pace to have four and a half million visitors. That would be an all-time record. All those people mean a lot of traffic in a place known for its serenity.  And as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports the Park Service is in the process of making changes so visitors won’t have to often wait in what feels like rush hour traffic in the middle of the forest.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition our staff reports stories on methane, construction in Yosemite National Park, mental health facilities in Fresno and homelessness in Merced. We also debut a  second episode of our podcast Outdoorsy. In it we explore the Mono Hot Springs area. Ending the program we speak with Bruce Kiesling, the music director for the Tulare County Symphony. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we take a look at how a new land designation for protected frogs in the Sierra Nevada will affect businesses in the region. We also hear from KVPR Reporter Jeffrey Hess about how a disgraced Bakersfield Police Detective was sentenced to five years. Later we are joined by Greg Little with the Mariposa Gazette to chat about the resignation of the superintendent of Yosemite National Park. Ending the program we are joined by Stilian Kirov of the Bakersfield Symphony. 

Tom Clifton / Flickr

In an effort to bump up the number of endangered yellow-legged frogs in the Sequoia and Kings Canyon area the National Park Service has approved a plan to remove nonnative fish from lakes and streams. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports.


Nonnative trout were introduced into the Sierra Nevada in the late 1800’s. Danny Boiano is an aquatic biologist in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park.


Ezra David Romero

Late this summer endangered frogs and threatened toads that call the Sierra Nevada home were given 1.8 million acres of protected habitat. That’s a good thing for the amphibians, but as FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports private landowners and ranchers aren’t so sure it will help them.  

Yosemite National Park Biologist Rob Grasso and his crew of volunteers are in a hurry. They’re counting tadpoles from a pond and plopping them into five gallon orange coolers. These tadpoles will end up in a lake high up in the backcountry.

Edward stojakovic/Flickr

California is on the move to keep farmers from using pesticides near schools. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports.

A proposed ruling announced this week would limit the time growers across the state will be able to spray pesticides within a quarter mile of schools and day care centers from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. This is all part of the California Department of Pesticide Regulation’s plan to keep kids safe.