Ezra David Romero

Reporter and Producer

Ezra David Romero is an award-winning radio reporter and producer. His stories have run on Morning Edition, Morning Edition Saturday, Morning Edition Sunday, All Things Considered, Here & Now, The Salt, Latino USA, KQED, KALW, Harvest Public Radio, etc.

Romero has worked with Valley Public Radio for just under three years. He landed at KVPR after interning with Al Jazeera English during the 2012 presidential election. His series ‘Voices of the Drought’ using the hashtag #droughtvoices has garnered over 1 million impressions on Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram. It's also resulted in two photography exhibits and a touring pop-up gallery traveling across California. Stories affiliated with #droughtvoices have run locally, statewide and on national air. 

In June he was awarded a first place radio award by the Fresno County Farm Bureau for a piece on the nation’s first agricultural hackathon.

In early 2015, he was awarded two prestigious Golden Mike Awards through the RTNA of Southern California for a piece on budding tech in Central California and a story on Spanish theater. Valley Edition, the show Romero produces, was named for the best Public Affairs Program for 2013 by the RTNDA of Northern California. 

He’s a graduate of California State University Fresno, where he studied journalism (digital media) and geography. He has worked for the Fresno Bee covering police, elections, government and higher education. In 2012 he was a Gruner Award finalist for his 13-part Sanger Herald series on obesity in Sanger, Calif. 

In his spare time, Romero hikes the Sierra Nevada, takes road trips to the Pacific Coast and frequently visits ice cream shops.

Ways To Connect

Ezra David Romero

Despite the ramifications of this four year drought Fresno County announced today/Monday that its farming value for 2014 increased over nine percent. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports.

The lack of rain and snow has made it a tough few years on farmers, but according to the Fresno County Department of Agriculture 2014 Crop and Livestock Report the county’s gross value has increased from around $6.5 billion to just over $7 billion. Although, the increase doesn’t necessarily mean farmers are making more money.

Ryan Jacobsen is the Fresno County Farm Bureau CEO.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we start off the program with a segment about the Rough Fire. Mike Pruitt, a spokesman on the Rough Fire, and KVPR's Ezra David Romero join Host Joe Moore to talk about the blaze. We also hear the story of how 25 hikers were smoked out of the backcountry because of the fire. 

Later we hear from KVPR Reporter Diana Aguilera. She brings a story on how Igbo Tribal members from Nigeria in the Fresno region are working to preserve their heritage. 

Courtesy of Steve German

The lightning ignited Rough Fire is still only three percent contained at 32,400 acres even though it started on the last day of July. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports that the blaze isn’t only affecting the community of Hume Lake, but backpackers as well.

Twenty-five hikers finally made it out of the back country of the Sierra Nevada today after being trapped at roads end in Kings Canyon National Park for up two days.

Courtesy US Forest Service / InciWeb

August 25

The lightning ignited Rough Fire is still only 17 percent contained, even though the burn area has grown to 51,794 acres. There are 1,984 firefighters using 138 engines and 10 helicopters to fight the blaze.  

In an interview Tuesday morning Valley Public Radio's Joe Moore spoke with Rough Fire Spokesman Mike Pruitt about the blaze. Reporter Ezra David Romero also shares about his experience at the fire and shares the story of 25 backpackers who had to hike out of the backcountry. Listen to the interview and story above. 

Ezra David Romero / Valley Public Radio

There’s been a lot of noise around El Niño in the news lately. We don’t know if it’ll cure California’s drought, but in places prone to flooding officials are already prepping for the worst.  FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports on why officials hope to dig deep to prevent flooding and restore the aquifer.

At the moment the mood is hopeful at the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Hanford.   

"National Weather Service, this is Jerald How may I help you," says Jerald Meadows, warning coordination meteorologist with the San Joaquin Valley Weather Forecast Office. 

Courtesty of NOAA / http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/facts/elnino.html

El Niño could bring much needed storms to Central California, but if storm drop too much rain or happen back-to-back then flooding could happen. To explain more Valley Edition Host Joe Moore was joined by Meteorologist and Fresno State Lecturer Sean Boyd this week to talk about the looming El Niño.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition FM89's Ezra David Romero reports on how officials in the Fresno area prepping for possible flooding from a looming El Niño. Meteorologist and Fresno State Lecturer Sean Boyd explains what's conjuring up what could be an answer to California's drought.  

The giant sequoias in the Sierra Nevada are one of America's treasures, but for the first time in Sequoia National Park's history, the trees are showing visible signs of exhaustion due to the drought.

On a hike last summer, a scientist noticed that the needles of the giant sequoias were browning and more sparse than usual. This finding got ecologists thinking: Did the drought cause this?

Susie Wyshack / Creative Commons

The effects of drought have altered the quantity and quality of vegetables grown in Central California, but that may change for table olives. FM89’s Ezra David Romero reports.

The majority of olive trees are self-pollinating. If there’s a storm during bloom time the rain washes off pollen from the flowers resulting in fewer olives come harvest. That’s what happened in 2013 and 2014. But this year weather conditions were so ideal that California’s crop is predicted to double from 36,000 tons to 67,000 tons.

Courtesy of the Fresno Art Museum

The Fresno dance group NOCO is teaming up with the Fresno Philharmonic for an evening of dance and music. The Summer Soirée was named on the Fresno Bee's 2014 Top 20 Cultural events. There will be two evening events, August 15 and 16.

Valley Edition Host Joe Moore spoke with NOCO's Amy Querin andThe Fresno Philharmonic's Executive Director Stephen Wilson. Listen to the full interview above.

For more on the event visit the Fresno Art Museum's website.

Courtesy of Steve Skibbie

Creative Fresno is on the hunt for murals. 

Murals outside of bars. Murals on random petroleum station walls. Murals in parks. 

Murals. Murals. Murals. 

The group recently began collecting data on murals throughout Fresno County in a project called the Digital Mural Map funded by the Fresno Regional Foundation. The project will feature photos of the murals and information about the artists on a mobile friendly website and later select murals will be featured in a photo book. The mural hunt will end in December and the website should be up and running in May, 2016.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition KVPR's Jeffrey Hess reports on animal control in Fresno County. Later, Host Joe Moore is joined by Bill McEwen of The Fresno Bee to talk about schools and politics in Fresno. 

Ezra David Romero

The Giant Sequoias in the Sierra Nevada are one of America’s treasures.  But for the first time in the parks history the trees are showing visible signs of exhaustion due to the drought:  thin and browning leaves. Valley Public Radio’s Ezra David Romero hikes into one of the largest groves of Giant Sequoias and finds a crew of scientists rushing to gather data by scaling the monstrous trees.

Anthony Ambrose is on the hunt in the Giant Forest in Sequoia National Park, but not for deer or wild boar.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition Reporter Jeffrey Hess reports on how ex-felons are finding a clean slate under Prop 47. He also interviews Barbara Scrivner who was granted clemency by President Obama in December after being incarcerated for 20 years for conspiracy to sell crystal meth. We also hear from Reporter Amy Quinton on how bats could help walnut growers control pests

By now most people know that almonds use a lot of water, about one gallon per nut. Most growers are relying on groundwater even more this year because their surface water has been cut off because of the drought. But as Valley Public Radio’s Ezra David Romero reports that brings a different problem all together, one that an “Almond Doctor” is trying to solve.

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition we take at a look at how a high concentration of salt in groundwater is harming almond trees. We also learn about how African-American babies have a higher infant mortality rate in the region compared to babies of other races. Research Scientist Lauren Lessard with the Central California Health Policy Institute joins us. 

Creative Commons

Fresno County is cracking down on roadside vendors selling fruit and vegetables illegally. Valley Public Radio’s Ezra David Romero reports.

We’ve all seen them, roadside vendors under umbrellas on country lanes selling strawberries, flowers and even mangoes. The problem is that many times these products are stolen, says Fred Rinder the Fresno County Deputy Agricultural Commissioner.

RINDER: “Businesses abide by the law and these folks don’t. It has an impact on the local businesses that are trying to make a living the legal and right way.”

Raman Bath / Fresno County Library

World renowned author William Saroyan is being honored as a great native son of the Central Valley with a an en exhibit by the The Fresno County Public Library.

The William Saroyan Gallery at the Central Library in Downtown Fresno opens Saturday, July 18th, at 2:30 PM for a ribbon cutting ceremony. Featured at the gallery are manuscripts, drawings, books and other memorabilia documenting Saroyan’s career as an author. 

Valley Public Radio

This week on Valley Edition KVPR Reporter Diana Aguilera interviews a Fresno teenager about the lack of sex education in Fresno Unified schools. Later in the program Valley Edition Host Joe Moore speaks with Shana Alex Charles with the UCLA Center For Healthy Policy Research and the California HealthCare Foundation about gaps in care for Valley Medi-Cal recipients

Fresno Food Expo

The fifth annual Fresno Food Expo is just weeks away and companies Valley wide are excited to showcase new products. Exhibitors from across the region revealed new items Wednesday evening for a taste, tally and tweet event at the Saroyan Theater in Downtown Fresno.

Valley Public Radio's Ezra David Romero went to the event and found three products that he says would be a shame to miss at the Fresno Food Expo July 22 and 23 in Downtown Fresno. 

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