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Interviews
2:04 pm
Sun June 9, 2013

NSA Whistleblower Revealed

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 3:36 pm

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Tess Vigeland.

After a steady drip, drip of leaks to the media about the secret surveillance programs run by the National Security Agency, this afternoon, The Guardian newspapers revealed the name of their source.

EDWARD SNOWDEN: My name is Ed Snowden. I'm 29 years old. I work for Booz Allen Hamilton as an infrastructure analyst for NSA in Hawaii.

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Interviews
2:02 pm
Sun June 9, 2013

Baseball Prepares For Suspensions

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 3:36 pm

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

Major League Baseball is preparing to hand down suspensions to some of its marquee players according to a recent ESPN report. It's the result of information the league obtained through a man named Tony Bosch, who reportedly supplied banned substances to athletes through his company Biogenesis of America.

Dave Zirin is sports editor for The Nation, and he joins us. Hello.

DAVE ZIRIN: Hey. Great to be here. Thanks for having me.

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Book Reviews
1:24 pm
Sun June 9, 2013

The Courage To Cross An Ocean, Explored In 'TransAtlantic'

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 3:36 pm

In 1845, Frederick Douglass sailed to Ireland on a speaking tour to raise money for the abolitionist cause back home. About 75 years later, two airmen, Jack Alcock and Teddy Brown, performed the first nonstop trans-Atlantic flight, flying 16 hours from Newfoundland to land in an Irish bog. And 79 years after that, George J. Mitchell, the former senator from Maine, repeatedly crisscrossed the ocean — New York, Belfast, New York, Belfast — to steer the Northern Ireland peace process on behalf of President Clinton.

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News
1:19 pm
Sun June 9, 2013

Britain Apologizes For Colonial-Era Torture Of Kenyan Rebels

Mau Mau leader Gitu wa Kahengeri, right, poses with British High Commissioner to Kenya Christian Turner at the end of a news conference announcing the settlement last week.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 3:36 pm

A 60-year-old wound in Kenya has finally found its recompense.

Last week, the British government finalized an out-of-court settlement with thousands of Kenyans who were tortured in detention camps during the end of the British colonial reign. The historic apology — and the unprecedented settlement — has been years in the making.

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Parallels
12:47 pm
Sun June 9, 2013

Murder Case Appears To Buck Trend Of Pakistani Corruption

Shahrukh Jatoi, top center, convicted of killing 20-year-old Shahzeb Khan, is escorted by members of the police to an Anti-Terrorism court in Karachi, Pakistan, on Friday.
Shakil Adil AP

"There are times when one's faith is restored in the judicial system here, in Pakistan," writes a gentleman called Sajjid Khan, in an unusually optimistic letter published by one of his nation's leading newspapers The Daily Times.

Pakistanis generally take a bleak view of their system of law and order, which tends to be dysfunctional and corrupt. Khan was inspired to put pen to paper by a criminal case that seems to buck that trend.

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The Two-Way
12:46 pm
Sun June 9, 2013

Newspaper Reveals Source For NSA Surveillance Stories

In a 12-minute video on The Guardian's website, Edward Snowden, a former technical assistant for the CIA talks about how American surveillance systems work and why he decided to reveal that information to the public.
The Guardian

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 3:32 am

  • "Guardian" reporter Glenn Greenwald on weekends on "All Things Considered"

The Guardian newspaper has identified the source for a series of reports it's published in recent days on secret U.S. surveillance activity as a former technical assistant for the CIA who now works for a private-sector defense and technology consulting firm.

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The Two-Way
10:24 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Rafael Nadal Wins Record Eighth French Open

Rafael Nadal of Spain plays a forehand during the Men's Singles final match against David Ferrer at the French Open on Sunday.
Matthew Stockman Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 10:58 am

Rafael Nadal beat fellow Spaniard David Ferrer 6-3, 6-2, 6-3 to win a record eighth French Open title on Sunday.

Nadal is now the first man to win eight singles titles at the same Grand Slam tournament. He's also won more matches than any other player at the French Open, with 59 wins.

"I never even dreamed about this kind of thing happening," Nadal said in his on-court interview. "But here we are."

The Associated Press writes:

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The Two-Way
10:05 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Bush-Era NSA Chief Defends PRISM, Phone Metadata Collection

Retired Gen. Michael Hayden, former CIA and National Security Agency director, in a 2012 photo.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 10:58 am

Gen. Michael Hayden, a former director of the National Security Agency, tells NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday that the government's acquisition of phone records and surveillance of Internet activity is lawful and justified by the changing nature of the war on terrorism.

Hayden, who served as NSA chief from 1999-2005 and is also a former CIA director, says NSA's activities are "perfectly legal" and "an accurate reflection of balancing our security and our privacy."

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Deceptive Cadence
9:26 am
Sun June 9, 2013

David Finckel On The Emerson Quartet's Changing Of The Guard

David Finckel is a longtime member of the Emerson String Quartet. Journeys: Tchaikovsky, Schoenberg is his last recording with the group.
Christian Steiner Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 9:09 am

The Emerson String Quartet is one of the most acclaimed chamber groups in the world of classical music. Since their founding in 1976, the group has won nine Grammys for its recordings. Now, it has a new album out called Journeys: Tchaikovsky, Schoenberg — and it's the last recording with cellist David Finckel, one of the quartet's longtime members.

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The Two-Way
8:19 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Family Strife Could Prove Motive In Santa Monica Shootings

This photo provided by the Santa Monica Police Department during a news conference Saturday shows a frame grab from a surveillance camera revealing the suspect entering Santa Monica College on Friday.
Ringo H.W. Chiu Associated Press

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 4:59 pm

Investigators were reportedly looking into family connections in their search for a motive in Friday's shooting rampage in Santa Monica, Calif., that left six people dead, including the gunman and a woman who died Sunday from injuries sustained in the assault.

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The Two-Way
7:30 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Delegations From Rival Koreas Meet At Panmunjom

South Korea's delegate (left) shakes hands with North Korea's head of working-level delegation Kim Song-Hye as she crosses the military demarcation line for the meeting at border village of Panmunjom.
Handout Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 11:41 am

For the first time in two years, delegations from North and South Korea sat down for talks aimed at ratcheting down escalating tensions on the peninsula.

The meeting took place at the symbolically significant border village of Panmunjom, where nearly 60 years ago the two sides signed an armistice ending the Korean War.

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The Two-Way
6:45 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Chinese Cyber-Hacking Discussed At Obama-Xi Summit

President Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping take a walk at the Annenberg Retreat at Sunnylands in Rancho Mirage, Calif., on Saturday.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 11:31 am

A two-day summit between President Obama and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, is being described as a "unique, positive and constructive" meeting that reportedly produced broad agreement on handling North Korea and put the thorny issue of cybersecurity at the forefront.

It was hoped the summit, which wrapped up Saturday in California, would be an opportunity for the two men to establish a personal relationship weeks after Xi assumed the presidency in China.

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The Two-Way
5:42 am
Sun June 9, 2013

The Latest On The NSA Surveillance Story

British Foreign Secretary William Hague.
Abbas Momani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 10:51 am

In the past several days, there's been a steady flow of leaks about the National Security Agency and its secret surveillance activities, including the gathering of metadata on domestic and foreign telephone calls and the existence of PRISM, described in media reports as a top-secret data-mining program.

New developments are occurring on a daily basis. Here are a few we're watching right now:

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Monkey See
4:03 am
Sun June 9, 2013

When Your Data Is Currency, What Does Your Privacy Cost?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 7:59 am

There was considerable mouth-dropping from publications such as The New York Times at initial reports this week that NSA programs are gathering both telephone records and information gleaned from large tech companies like Google and Microsoft. But as those reports have settled in, reactions have gotten more complex.

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The Salt
4:03 am
Sun June 9, 2013

An Abstract Look At The Food We Eat

Courtesy of Ajay Malghan

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 7:42 am

When photographer Ajay Malghan looks at this image, he sees the Virgin Mary. But you might see something entirely different — a flower petal, maybe. Or a sea slug.

Or how about ... a carrot? Yes, ladies and gentlemen, that is a picture of a sliced carrot.

And this? It's not a supernova. It's not the Eye of Sauron. It's a strawberry.

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The Sunday Conversation
3:50 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Making The Switch: An American Woman's Journey To Islam

Karen Danielson, who was raised Catholic, converted to Islam 30 years ago.
Courtesy of the Muslim American Society Chicago

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 11:35 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Karen Danielson converted to Islam three decades ago, was she was 19. She was raised Catholic, and then later became a Baptist and enrolled in a Baptist college, where she picked up the Koran. Now, she's the director of outreach at the Chicago chapter of the Muslim American Society.

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Parallels
3:33 am
Sun June 9, 2013

In Colombia, A Town Badly Scarred By Wartime Rape

Isabel Narvaez, in El Placer, says she is still traumatized by the rape she suffered. The small hamlet in Colombia is just one place where women were victims of violent crimes during the civil conflict.
Paul Smith for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 2:08 pm

El Placer is a remote hamlet deep in southern Colombia, on the edge of the Amazon. Founded half a century ago by farmers who found it fertile and bucolic, its name means "The Pleasure."

But for women and girls in El Placer who suffered years of sexual assaults after an illegal armed group stormed in, the name is only associated with unspeakable violence and murder.

Brigitte Carreño, 25, is among the women who suffered. A feared local warlord in El Placer raped her when she was 12, leaving her with searing memories that remain vivid and painful to this day.

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Around the Nation
2:07 am
Sun June 9, 2013

Lessons From Cicadas: A New Jersey Community's Experience

A member of Brood II alights on a New Jersey shrub.
Fred Mogul NPR

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 9:58 am

Ten-year-old Markus Gokan has mixed feelings about the cicadas scattered around the yards and sidewalks of Summit, N.J.

"There's tons of them just squashed, just these flat, pancake cicadas that don't look very appetizing," Gokan says.

Yet he's not afraid to touch and handle un-squashed cicadas — to serve a higher purpose.

"I did pick up a few, and I threw them at some people I don't like," he explains.

They screamed, he says, so for him his mission was successful.

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Parallels
2:05 am
Sun June 9, 2013

'Arab Idol' Finalist Delivers Sweet Music, Palestinian Pride

Palestinian performer Mohammad Assaf is a finalist on Arab Idol, which is filmed in the Lebanese city of Jounieh north of the capital Beirut.
Anwar Amro AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 5:18 am

In Palestinian territory, Mohammad Assaf's face is easy to find. Big posters of the dark-haired 23-year-old dreamboat smile at you along boulevards in Ramallah. And in Gaza, a giant banner of Assaf billows outside his family home.

Assaf's dad, Jabar Assaf, is bursting with pride.

"I'm very, very, very proud of my son. Besides singing so well, he is very polite, and he is studying at the university," Jabar Assaf says. "He's no street kid. I'm very proud."

So are many other Palestinians — including 16-year-old Abeer Ali.

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Around the Nation
2:05 am
Sun June 9, 2013

A Year Later, Few Residents Have Rebuilt After Colorado Fire

The High Park wildfire swept through the rural area northwest of Fort Colins, Colo., last June, leaving one person dead.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 9:58 am

Sunday marks the one-year anniversary of the High Park fire northwest of Fort Collins, Colo. The blaze consumed 259 homes in the rural area, but so far only 10 households have finished rebuilding a year later.

As Gary and Martha Lemert sort through photographs from the High Park fire, it takes just one before and after shot to convey the complete devastation of their 10-acre property.

All they had left after the fire was a green roof that looked like it had been melted on top of gray rubble. All told, the Lemerts lost eight buildings, including a garage and a guest house.

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