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All Tech Considered
9:04 am
Tue July 9, 2013

The 'Sink-Urinal' Saves Water, Encourages Men To Wash Hands

The design, called Stand, is already in use in several European countries.
Ingus Bajars Courtesy of Kaspar Jursons

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 9:53 am

In a blog series we're calling "Weekly Innovation," we'll explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. (Have an innovation to share? Use this quick form.)

A Latvian designer named Kaspars Jursons is trying to help solve European water shortages by redesigning the men's restroom. His new urinal design includes a tap and sink right over it.

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Shots - Health News
8:54 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Who's Watching When You Look For Health Information Online?

Down the online privacy rabbit hole.
NPR

When it comes to sensitive health information, government-run websites appear to do a better job protecting your privacy than many news and commercial sites.

A brief survey published online by JAMA Internal Medicine looked at how 20 health-related websites track visitors. They ranged from the sites of the National Institutes of Health to the health news section of The New York Times online.

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The Two-Way
8:53 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Is He Or Isn't He? Much Confusion Over Snowden And Venezuela

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:00 pm

Update at 9:40 p.m. ET. Snowden Likely To Seek Asylum In Venezuela

According to Glenn Greenwald, the U.S. journalist who has been at the forefront of the NSA leak case, former U.S. intelligence contractor Edward Snowden is likely to seek asylum in Venezuela, reports the Associated Press.

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Parallels
8:18 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Syria's War (The Official Version) Plays Out On TV

Syrian soap opera Wilada min al-Khasira is incorporating current events into its storylines, including tough subjects such as torture and the detention of anti-government protesters. The third season of the popular show begins this week.
Courtesy of Clacket Productions

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 9:31 am

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Parallels
8:16 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Key Takeaways From Pakistan's Report On Osama Bin Laden

Children walk past the house of former al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad, Pakistan, on May 8, 2011. A new Pakistani report says the "extent of incompetence" in failing to detect bin Laden despite the size of the house was "to put it mildly ... astounding, if not unbelievable."
Anjum Naveed AP

We've waded through the 336-page Pakistani report on the circumstances surrounding the killing of Osama bin Laden to find the most interesting bits. As we noted yesterday, it was obtained and published by Al Jazeera.

First of all, it starts more like a novel than a government-commissioned report:

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The Two-Way
7:39 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Reports: Obama Considers Pulling All Troops From Afghanistan

U.S. troops at an April re-enlistment ceremony in Jalalabad, Afghanistan.
Manjunath Kiran AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:50 am

President Obama is considering the withdrawal of all U.S. troops from Afghanistan by the end of 2014, leaving no small residual force in that nation, according to reports from The New York Times and CNN.

Here's how the Times begins its report:

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The Two-Way
7:12 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Residents Heading Home In Blasted Quebec Town

A view from above showing some of the destruction in Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, after Saturday's train derailment, explosions and the fires that followed.
Mathieu Belanger Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:35 pm

"A majority of the 2,000 people forced out of their Lac-Mégantic, Que., homes following the massive rail tank-car explosions Saturday morning are being allowed to return home today," CBC News reported Tuesday.

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The Two-Way
6:27 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Crash Investigators Turn To Asiana Pilot Who Was At Controls

NTSB investigators at the scene of the Asiana Flight 214 crash in San Francisco.
UPI/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:36 am

  • NTSB Chairman Deborah Hersman talks with NPR's Renee Montagne about the crash of Asiana Flight 214

As they try to find out why Asiana Flight 214 crashed Saturday at San Francisco International Airport, federal investigators plan to soon question the pilot who was at the Boeing 777's controls, National Transportation Safety Board Chair Deborah Hersman said Tuesday on Morning Edition.

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The Two-Way
5:32 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Washington Monument Now Glows At Night

Monday night when the lights came on, visitors came to see a glowing Washington Monument.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:57 am

  • NPR's Trina Williams on the lighting of the Washington Monument

The Two-Way team enjoyed a new view on the way to work in the predawn hours Tuesday morning:

The Washington Monument was all aglow.

As NPR's Trina Williams tells us, 488 lights are giving the monument some sparkle each night. The lights have been installed on scaffolding that surrounds the monument and were switched on at dusk Monday.

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Around the Nation
5:17 am
Tue July 9, 2013

NTSB Investigators To Talk More To Cockpit Crew

For the latest developments in the investigation into the crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 in San Francisco, Renee Montagne talks to the head of the National Transportation Safety Board Deborah Hersman. Of the four pilots, investigators have only talked to two so far. More interviews will be conducted Tuesday.

Europe
4:28 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Mr. Darcy Statue Emerges From Hyde Park's Serpentine Lake

The 12-foot statue embodies the character played by Colin Firth in the BBC adaption of Pride and Prejudice. Brits recently ranked his spontaneous swim the most memorable TV drama moment.

Around the Nation
4:23 am
Tue July 9, 2013

The Family That Spits Together, Stays Together

The 40th Annual International Cherry Pit Spitting Championship was just held in Michigan. Matt Krause won when a pit flew nearly 42 feet. His brother Brian has won nine times, and his dad has won the title 15 times.

The Two-Way
4:15 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Book News: Barnes & Noble's CEO Quits

  • Barnes & Noble CEO William Lynch Jr. resigned Monday following several grim earnings reports and the company's recent announcement that it would stop manufacturing its own Nook tablets. A new chief executive wasn't named, but Michael P. Huseby has been named president of Barnes & Noble and chief executive of the Nook division.
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The Two-Way
4:13 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Egypt's Interim Leader May Tap Emergency Law Used By Mubarak

Egypt's military and the nation's interim leaders say the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi was not a coup, but rather a response to public demand. Morsi's supporters believe otherwise. If it was judged to be a coup, the U.S. might have to cut off aid to Egypt's military.
Ed Giles Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 8:15 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports from Cairo

With the news still echoing across Egypt that more than 50 people were killed during a protest over the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi, the country's interim leader issued a decree late Monday that gives himself sweeping powers until new elections are held.

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Critics' Lists: Summer 2013
4:03 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Best Of The Summer: 6 Books The Critics Adore

Andrew Bannecker

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 1:30 pm

There is no one definition of a summer book. It can be a 1,000-page biography, a critically acclaimed literary novel, a memoir everyone is talking about — or it might be your favorite guilty pleasure: romance, crime, science fiction. Whatever you choose, it should be able to sweep you away to another world, because there is nothing like getting totally lost in a book on summer day. Here are a few books that swept away some of our favorite critics.

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Author Interviews
3:44 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Comedian Aisha Tyler Talks About Flipping Off Failure

Tyler says as a kid she stood out because of her height, her glasses, and her vegetarian lunches.
Aisha Tyler

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 9:50 am

Comedian and actor Aisha Tyler brews beer, plays video games, tells dirty jokes, drinks fancy booze and ... writes books.

She has a new one out this week: Self-inflicted Wounds: Heartwarming Tales of Epic Humilation. We sat down in the NPR studios over a mug of 18-year-old scotch to talk about her most embarrassing moments on the road to success. (No, really, we did. Listen to us toast.)

For those of you wondering who Aisha Tyler is, here's a quick breakdown (to be read quickly):

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NPR Story
2:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Snowden's Leaks Puts National Security Agency In A Bind

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 3:55 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

As Larry just said, the Privacy Board can now openly debate NSA surveillance programs, thanks to the revelations from Edward Snowden. And this is just one example of how Snowden's leaks have put the NSA in a bind. To talk more about this we're joined by NPR's justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Carrie, thanks for coming in.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: Thank you.

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NPR Story
2:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Privacy Board To Scrutinize Surveillance Programs

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 3:49 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Just after Edward Snowden first leaked secrets about government surveillance, he gave an interview to two journalists while he was hiding out in Hong Kong. Yesterday, The Guardian newspaper released more of that interview with Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras.

GREENE: In that video, Snowden discusses why he exposed the surveillance programs.

(SOUNDBITE OF INTERVIEW)

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NPR Story
2:01 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Navigating The Skills To Successfully Land A Jet

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 3:35 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And to help us understand more about what that cockpit crew may have been facing, we reached David Esser. He's an airline transport pilot and a professor of Aeronautical Science at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Florida.

Good morning.

DAVID ESSER: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: Now even if as we just heard, accidents like this are a result of a chain of events, it's clear in this case that something did go wrong during the landing. Describe for us the difficulty of landing an aircraft like this.

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Political Crisis In Egypt
12:48 am
Tue July 9, 2013

What Egyptian State TV Says About The State Of Egypt

In an image from a video broadcast on Egyptian state TV, President Mohammed Morsi addresses the nation on July 2 — his final speech before the military deposed him.
Ismael Mohamad UPI /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 5:23 am

It sounded like a slip of the tongue. As millions of Egyptians took to the streets calling for President Mohammed Morsi to step down, state TV anchor George Heshmat casually used the word "revolution" instead of "protests."

This signaled that state TV was beginning to assert its independence from a government that was never a good fit for it anyway. It was clear that something had changed at the voice of the state — even before Morsi was pushed from power.

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