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NPR Story
7:09 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Trying to Energize the Push for a Smart Grid

For years, electrical experts have been calling for a "smart grid" that could better sense and adapt to changing conditions, from electrical outages to shifts in power consumption. Massoud Amin, referred to by some as the "father of the smart grid," talks about how and why the country should improve its aging electrical infrastructure.

NPR Story
7:09 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Mysterious Radio Bursts, Sent From Deep Space

Reporting in Science, researchers write of discovering four radio bursts from outer space. Physicist Duncan Lorimer, who detected the first such explosion in 2007, discusses what could be causing these radio signals, such as evaporating black holes, an idea proposed by Stephen Hawking in the 1970s.

NPR Story
7:09 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Surf's Up for Pathogenic Viruses and Bacteria, Too

A day at the shore can leave beachgoers with more than a sunburn — a gulp of seawater can expose swimmers to disease-causing microbes like norovirus, salmonella, and adenovirus. Marine scientist Rachel Noble and environmental medicine researcher Samuel Dorevitch discuss the risk, and what's being done to limit swimmers' exposure.

TED Radio Hour
6:51 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Can You Code A Better Government?

Jennifer Pahlka speaking about Code for America at the TED conference.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 7:06 am

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Collaborate.

About Jennifer Pahlka's TEDTalk

Can government be run like the Internet, permissionless and open? Coder and activist Jennifer Pahlka believes it can — and that apps, built quickly and cheaply, are a powerful new way to connect citizens to their governments — and their neighbors.

About Jennifer Pahlka

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TED Radio Hour
6:51 am
Fri July 12, 2013

What Motivates Us To Collaborate?

Clay Shirky speaking at TED.
Robert Leslie TED

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 7:02 am

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Collaborate.

About Clay Shirky's TEDTalk

Social media guru Clay Shirky looks at "cognitive surplus" — the shared, online work we do with our spare brain cycles. While we're busy contributing to the web in our small ways, we're building a better, more cooperative world.

About Clay Shirky

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TED Radio Hour
6:51 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Why We Collaborate

How do you channel mass chaos into order?
Joos Mind Getty Images

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 6:53 am

What motivates dozens, thousands, even millions of people to come together on the Internet and commit their time to a project for free? In this hour, TED speakers unravel ideas behind the mystery of mass collaborations that build a better world.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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TED Radio Hour
6:51 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Why Does Wikipedia Work?

Jimmy Wales, the founder of Wikipedia, speaking at TED.
Robert Leslie TED

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 6:47 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Collaborate.

About Jimmy Wales' TEDTalk

Founder of Wikipedia Jimmy Wales recalls how he assembled "a ragtag band of volunteers," gave them tools for collaborating to create a self-organizing, self-correcting, never-finished online encyclopedia.

About Jimmy Wales

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It's All Politics
6:44 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Top Democrat Says Documents Show IRS Also Targeted Liberals

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Darrell Issa (right) speaks with the committee's ranking Democrat, Elijah Cummings, during a hearing last month.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 9:04 am

Newly released documents appear to further undermine the idea that Tea Party groups were the only ones given extra scrutiny by the IRS for potential political activity.

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The Two-Way
5:57 am
Fri July 12, 2013

On The Economy: Inflation Accelerates; Fed Rumors Rise

A surge in prices at the pump fueled inflation in June.
Jonathan Fickies Landov

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 9:55 am

The morning's major economic news:

-- Inflation. Wholesale prices rose 0.8 percent in June from May, fueled by a 2.9 percent surge in the price of energy products, the Bureau of Labor Statistics says. As drivers can confirm, a 7.2 percent jump in the cost of gasoline was responsible for most of that boost.

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The Two-Way
5:32 am
Fri July 12, 2013

VIDEO: 'I Need Help' San Diego Mayor Says

San Diego Mayor Bob Filner in the video statement he released Thursday.
City of San Diego

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 5:51 am

In a video statement to the people of his city, San Diego Mayor Bob Filner conceded Thursday that he has "failed to fully respect the women who work for me and with me, and that at times, I have intimidated them."

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The Two-Way
4:53 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Teen Jailed For Facebook Post Expresses Regrets

An undated photo of Justin Carter, who's facing a felony "terroristic threat" charge in Texas.
Courtesy Jack Carter

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 8:36 am

"I certainly would have thought a lot more about what I said. ... People should be very careful about what they say" on social media sites.

That was the word Friday morning on CNN's New Day from Justin Carter, the 19-year-old Texas gamer who was arrested and jailed in February after making a Facebook comment about a school shooting.

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The Two-Way
4:39 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Book News: 'The Great Gypsy'? School Reading List Is Error-Riddled

A student of the Barack Obama elementary school in Hempstead, N.Y. walks past a board displaying student essays on the president during the official name changing ceremony in 2009.
Mary Altaffer AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
4:13 am
Fri July 12, 2013

READ: Instructions For The Jury In Trial Of George Zimmerman

George Zimmerman in court on Thursday.
Gary W. Green/pool Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 5:44 am

Nearly 17 months after the shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin — a death that would spark protests across the nation — a jury is about to begin considering whether defendant George Zimmerman acted in self defense or should be convicted of murder or manslaughter.

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Europe
4:00 am
Fri July 12, 2013

After WikiLeaks Drama, Kremlin Goes Old School

The Kremlin's security agency has bought $15,000 worth of electric typewriters. A source told a Russian newspaper that after WikiLeaks and the Edward Snowden scandal, the Kremlin decided to "expand the practice of creating paper documents."

Around the Nation
3:56 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Calif. City Moves To Freeze Ice Cream Trucks' Music Output

For many kids, the music of ice cream trucks is the sound of summer. For some adults, however, it ruins peace and quiet. The Long Beach City Council has drafted legislation to limit when ice cream trucks can play music.

The Two-Way
3:33 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Snowden Hopes For Temporary Asylum In Russia

Edward Snowden, center, at Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport on Friday. At left is WikiLeaks' Sarah Harrison. The woman at right is unidentified at this time.
Courtesy of Human Rights Watch

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 10:02 am

(We most recently added information to the top of this post at 11:15 a.m. ET. Click here for more updates. )

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Code Switch
2:13 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Oakland Braces For Seeing Subway Shooting On The Big Screen

Cephus "Bobby" Johnson in 2011, when the former transit officer who shot Johnson's nephew, Oscar Grant, was released from jail. Johnson and other family members have seen Fruitvale Station, a new feature film depicting the shooting, multiple times.
Jason Redmond AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 2:00 pm

It's not often that Oakland, Calif., hosts a movie opening. But there is plenty of anticipation for Fruitvale Station.

The film is about the life and death of Oscar Grant, a young black man who was fatally shot in the back by a white transit police officer in the early morning hours of New Year's Day in 2009.

Grant was killed by Officer Johannes Mehserle, who claimed to have been reaching for his Taser, not his handgun. Mehserle was tried and convicted of involuntary manslaughter and served 11 months of a two-year term.

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Movie Reviews
2:13 am
Fri July 12, 2013

'Pacific Rim' Is Filled To The Brim With Special Effects

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 3:06 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Another movie opening is "Pacific Rim." Critic Kenneth Turan says it has plenty of explosions and special effects, but he says there's actually more to it than most of the other blockbusters this summer.

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Environment
2:13 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Environmentalists Warn Olympic Games Will Harm Sochi

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 3:19 am

Russia is preparing for the 2014 Winter Games — turning a sleepy valley in the Northern Caucasus Mountains into an Olympic village, with brand-new facilities for every Alpine sport. Officials say it will be a world-class destination for winter-sports enthusiasts long after the Games are over. Environmentalists say it's an ecological disaster in the making.

The Two-Way
12:22 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Chuck Foley, Co-Creator Of Twister, Dies At 82

Festivalgoers play a giant game of Twister during the Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts in southwest England last month.
Andrew Cowie AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 7:40 am

One of the men responsible for getting people tied up in knots while they played Twister has died.

Charles "Chuck" Foley died earlier this month in St. Paul, Minn. He was 82.

Foley and his business partner Neil Rabens invented the game for Milton Bradley in 1966. The pair originally called it Pretzel, and it was Milton Bradley who came up with the name Twister.

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