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The Two-Way
11:23 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Illinois Is 50th State To Legalize Carrying Concealed Weapons

Illinois became the last state in the U.S. to legalize carrying concealed weapons after state lawmakers overrode a veto by Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn.

Tuesday's votes — 41-17 in the Senate and 77-31 in the House — came just before a federal appeals court deadline to pass a form of concealed-carry.

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Parallels
11:15 am
Wed July 10, 2013

That Blows: Cricket's Trumpet-Playing Superfan Silenced

Former England cricketer Geoffrey Boycott listens to Barmy Army trumpeter Billy Cooper during the second test between New Zealand and England at Basin Reserve on March 15 in Wellington, New Zealand. Cooper's trumpet will be silent at Trent Bridge, in Nottingham, England, because the ground doesn't allow musical instruments.
Gareth Copley Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 1:42 pm

The English national character is an eternal mystery. But from time to time we get a glimpse of some of its components. The story of Billy The Trumpet is one such occasion.

Billy is the embodiment of English eccentricity. He belongs to a boisterous ragtag band of sports fans called the Barmy Army. They're considered "barmy" for very good reason: These people follow England's national cricket team everywhere.

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Health
10:54 am
Wed July 10, 2013

When Choirs Sing, Many Hearts Beat As One

Members of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir raise their voices in unison — and perhaps unify their heart rates, too.
George Frey Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 5:33 am

We open our hymnals to Hymn 379, and we begin to sing. "God is Love, let heav'n adore him / God is Love, let earth rejoice ..."

Lifting voices together in praise can be a transcendent experience, unifying a congregation in a way that is somehow both fervent and soothing. But is there actually a physical basis for those feelings?

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The Two-Way
10:54 am
Wed July 10, 2013

DogTV, The Channel For Stay-At-Home Pups, Is Going National

Bleu, a French bulldog who lives in San Diego, watches DogTV during the network's initial months online and on cable outlets in Southern California, in April 2012.
Gregory Bull AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 11:40 am

Tell your best friend:

DogTV, which launched online in Southern California last year, says it's going national on DirecTV starting Aug. 1.

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NPR Story
10:50 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Displacement Can Last A Lifetime For Many Refugees

A Syrian refugee boy, right, sits outside his tent next to his family at a temporary refugee camp in the eastern Lebanese town of Marj near the border with Syria, Lebanon, Monday, May 20, 2013. (Hussein Malla/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 7:05 am

According to a recent report by the United Nations, more than 45 million people worldwide were forced to flee their homes in 2012 — the highest number of refugees in nearly two decades.

People leave their homes for many reasons, including war and violence, environmental disaster and persecution. More than half of the refugees worldwide came from five countries, according to the UN: Afghanistan, Somalia, Iraq, Sudan and Syria.

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NPR Story
10:46 am
Wed July 10, 2013

A Jedi Knight In Queen Elizabeth's Court

Cover art from "William Shakespeare's Star Wars." (Quirk Books)

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 9:50 am

What if William Shakespeare had written Star Wars? Well now we know!

Ian Doescher, author of “William Shakespeare’s Star Wars: Verily, A New Hope” pulls back curtain on the eternal question: what does a wookie sound like in Elizabethan English?

Book Excerpt: ‘William Shakespeare’s Star Wars’

By: Ian Doescher

BIGGS: Make haste, O Luke. Methinks they do approach

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NPR Story
10:46 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Spain's Population Declines Amid Economic Crisis

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 8:50 am

The economic crisis in Spain, where the unemployment rate is a record 27 percent, is forcing people to leave the country to look for work.

The BBC’s Tom Burridge reports the birthrate in Spain is also falling, because couples believe they can’t afford to have children under the economic circumstances.

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The Two-Way
10:41 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Defense Rests In Zimmerman Trial; Race 'Permeates The Case'

Trayvon Martin's friend Rachel Jeantel testifies in the murder trial of George Zimmerman. Her testimony sparked discussions of the racial issues involved in the case.
Jacob Langston UPI /Landov

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 2:14 pm

The defense is expected to wrap up its case Wednesday afternoon at the murder trial of George Zimmerman, the Florida neighborhood watch volunteer accused in the February 2012 shooting death of teenager Trayvon Martin.

Update at 4:50 p.m. ET: Defense Rests Case

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It's All Politics
10:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Once A Rising GOP Star, Virginia's Governor Hits The Skids

Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell won one of two governorships that the GOP picked up in 2009.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 1:00 pm

Just last year, Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell was a hot Republican prospect, ranked among the nation's most respected state leaders, and was touted as prime vice presidential material.

Those heady days are long gone.

After a seemingly endless series of reports about alleged ethical lapses by the buttoned-down, fiscally conservative governor, no one talks about his political promise anymore.

Instead, the rumor mill generates talk of his impending resignation, with the governor's spokesman denying via Twitter a weekend blog report that he would step down from office.

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The Two-Way
9:42 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Live From Mecca, It's Ramadan

Muslims circle the Kaaba as they pray inside the Grand Mosque in the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, during last October's hajj pilgrimage.
Hassan Ammar AP

Live streaming views of the Grand Mosque in Mecca, the holy city in Saudi Arabia that is closed to virtually all non-Muslim visitors, are playing online, depicting pilgrims' visits for the holy month of Ramadan. The video shows the faithful performing prayers and circumambulation around the Kaaba, the sacred cube at the mosque's center.

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The Salt
9:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Do Diet Drinks Mess Up Metabolisms?

Some researchers think that artificial sweeteners, most frequently consumed in diet drinks, may confuse the body.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 2:10 pm

It may seem counterintuitive, but there's a body of evidence to suggest that the millions of Americans with a diet soda habit may not be doing their waistlines — or their blood sugar — any favors.

As the consumption of diet drinks made with artificial sweeteners continues to rise, researchers are beginning to make some uncomfortable associations with weight gain and other diseases.

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It's All Politics
9:28 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Despite Youth Support, Democrats Having A Senior Moment

Vice President Biden (left) and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada react to cheers from the crowd at a campaign rally on Oct. 18, 2012, in Las Vegas.
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 10:36 am

Democrats aren't getting any younger. At least, their top leaders aren't.

Voters under the age of 30 were key to President Obama's electoral success. But Obama's going gray and his most prominent potential successors aren't paragons of youth.

Hillary Clinton, who would be the presumptive Democratic favorite for president the minute she decided to run, will be 69 in 2016. Vice President Biden is already 70.

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Race
9:15 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Zimmerman Trial In The Court Of Public Opinion

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 12:56 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Maybe it was fatigue, maybe it was the stress of a long trial, but last night came one of the most intense courtroom exchanges so far in the trial of George Zimmerman. It ended up with Judge Debra Nelson walking out of the courtroom.

(SOUNDBITE OF ZIMMERMAN TRIAL)

DEBRA NELSON: I'm not getting into this. Court is in recess. I will give my ruling in the morning. I'll see you at eight o'clock in the morning.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN 1: Your Honor...

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Law
9:15 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Is The Zimmerman Prosecution Legally 'Weak?'

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 12:56 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. The trial of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin has riveted people who are interested in criminal justice issues. But that's not all, the story has clearly touched many nerves, and has sparked all kinds of conversations. Certainly about race, but also about things like how we perceive people based on how they look and how they speak.

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Law
9:15 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Zimmerman Trial: The View From Inside The Courtroom

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 12:56 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We've decided to devote the entire program today to one story: the trial of George Zimmerman. Of course, he's the Florida man who shot and killed an unarmed teenager named Trayvon Martin last year. The trial of Mr. Zimmerman on second-degree murder charges is almost over. So we thought this would be a good moment to review some of the key moments in the trial and also some of the important discussions that have emerged in the course of this trial and this story.

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The Two-Way
8:31 am
Wed July 10, 2013

White House Honors For Frank Deford, Joan Didion & Others

NPR

Forgive us for pointing first to someone with an NPR connection, but we figure his fans will want to know that Morning Edition commentator Frank Deford is among those being honored Wednesday afternoon at the White House.

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The Protojournalist
8:13 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Elevator Pitch: Why Care About Washington?

wbeem via Flickr

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 8:24 am

­­My friend Mark Leibovich — a New York Times reporter — has written a book about the inner watchworkings of Power Washington called This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral-Plus, Plenty of Valet Parking!-in America's Gilded Capital. Among the incestuous cognoscenti of the Capital City, This Town has more buzz than a top-bar beehive.

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The Two-Way
7:53 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Hey, It's Not A Burglar, It's A 19-Foot Python

Employees hold a huge python caught in an Australian charity store. Police initially thought a burglar had fallen through the roof and made a mess.
Queensland Police AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 8:57 am

Imagine this: A 19-foot python falls out of the ceiling of a store and leaves a big hole, knocks over sale objects and then makes a nasty mess on the floor before hiding in plain sight along a wall. And nobody finds it for a day.

Police in Queensland, Australia, were called to a charity store in the tiny town of Ingham this week to investigate what they initially suspected was a break-in by someone with stomach flu.

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The Two-Way
7:29 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Apple Conspired To Set E-Book Prices, Judge Rules

A federal judge ruled Wednesday that Apple conspired with publishers to fix e-book prices.
Manu Fernandez AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 11:19 am

Apple Inc. "conspired to raise the retail price of e-books," a federal judge ruled Wednesday as a civil lawsuit brought by the Justice Department reached its conclusion.

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Shots - Health News
7:13 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Catholics Split Again On Coverage For Birth Control

Baltimore Archbishop William Lori gave voice to a letter Catholic groups sent to the administration and Congress to protest insurance rules for contraceptives.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 11:42 am

  • As Heard On Morning Edition

Two prominent Catholic groups are finding themselves, once again, on opposite sides of a key issue regarding the Affordable Care Act.

Three years ago, the Catholic Health Association, whose members run hospitals and nursing homes across the country, backed passage of the health law. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, which represents the hierarchy of the church, opposed it.

Now the groups are divided over the law's requirement for most employer-based health insurance plans to provide women with birth control.

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