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The Two-Way
11:08 am
Thu April 11, 2013

'Sandy' Retired From Storm Names; 'Sara' Takes Its Place

Oct. 31, 2012: Some of the destruction caused by Hurricane Sandy in Seaside Heights, N.J.
Steve Nesius Reuters /Landov

"Sandy has been retired from the official list of Atlantic Basin tropical cyclone names by the World Meteorological Organization's hurricane committee because of the extreme impacts it caused from Jamaica and Cuba to the Mid-Atlantic United States in October 2012," the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration writes.

The storm names are administered by the World Meteorological Organization.

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The Two-Way
10:55 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Mon Dieu! Louvre Shuts For A Day Over Pickpockets

Visitors stands in front of the entrance to the Louvre in Paris, on Wednesday. The museum was closed for the day after workers walked off the job to protest what they say is the increasing problem of pickpockets in the museum's vast galleries.
Jacques Brinon AP

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 4:58 pm

If you tried to visit the Louvre on Wednesday, you'd have been disappointed.

In fact, even a visit to the museum's website got you this message:

"Due to exceptional circumstances, the Louvre museum is currently closed. We apologize for the inconvenience and will keep you informed when the museum opens again."

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Shots - Health News
10:38 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Leading Man's Chin: Universally Hot Or Not?

Two prominent chins meet: Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman kiss in the 1946 thriller Notorious.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 6:02 am

Cary Grant's chin may appeal to you and Ingrid Bergman. But that might not be the case among the indigenous people of Australia.

And the idea that a guy's jutting jawline might not cause women the world over to swoon calls into question the notion that some characteristics are pretty much automatic signals of desirability for prospective mates, researchers say.

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The Two-Way
10:01 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Ryan Says He's 'Cautiously Optimistic' On A Bipartisan Budget Deal

Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan speaks about his new budget plan after a March 19 party conference.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 7:55 am

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan tells NPR that he's "cautiously optimistic" that a budget deal can be reached with the White House.

Speaking to NPR a day after President Obama unveiled a 2014 budget proposal that includes cuts to Social Security and Medicare, as well as tax increases and new investments in education and infrastructure, Ryan said he was encouraged by the broad outlines from the White House.

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The Two-Way
10:00 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Will Tiger Master Augusta Again?

Tiger Woods tees off on the first hole Thursday at the Masters tournament in Augusta, Ga.
Mike Segar Reuters /Landov

Play has begun at the 77th Masters in Augusta, Ga., and again this year the big question is whether Tiger Woods is really "back" and will win his first major championship since 2008.

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The Salt
9:21 am
Thu April 11, 2013

A Project To Rescue Pantry Puzzlers Before They Hit The Trash

"Overly adventurous food shopping gets me in trouble every time, along with complicated recipes (calling for obscure ingredients) that I never actually end up making," writes Lee Crosby.
Courtesy of Lee Crosby

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 4:43 pm

It's the season for dusting, scrubbing and digging into the inner confines of the cupboard, where a stash of daunting ingredients may await.

Rather than generate more food waste, consider tapping the wisdom of the crowd through NPR's new Cook Your Cupboard project.

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Politics
9:03 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Rand Paul's Philosophies: Rhetoric Or Reality?

Host Michel Martin continues her interview with Senator Rand Paul. She asks whether his actions really line up with his libertarian philosophies.

Politics
9:03 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Rand Paul And Minorities, 'A Date Or A Relationship?'

Senator Rand Paul is reaching out to African-American voters. He recently visited Howard University, one of the country's most prominent historically black universities. Senator Paul talks to host Michel Martin about why he's reaching out, and what his message is for minorities.

The Two-Way
8:47 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Gun Bill Clears First Hurdle In Senate

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 9:45 am

The first national gun control legislation since the Dec. 14 school shooting in Newtown, Conn., is going to be debated on the floor of the Senate and appears headed for a vote sometime next week.

Supporters in the Senate on Thursday morning rounded up more than the 60 votes necessary to clear a procedural hurdle that could have held up consideration of the Democratic-crafted package. The vote was 68-31 in favor of blocking a bid by some Republicans to filibuster the legislation.

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Theater
8:40 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Was Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. An Ordinary Guy?

The Mountaintop is an award-winning play about the night Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. died. But some critics don't love playwright Katori Hall's portrayal of the civil rights icon as a regular guy. Hall tells host Michel Martin why she found it important to focus on the man, not the myth.

13.7: Cosmos And Culture
8:08 am
Thu April 11, 2013

When Animals Mourn: Seeing That Grief Is Not Uniquely Human

An elephant at the Emmen, Netherlands, zoo stands at the edge of a ditch in 2009, a day after another elephant fell into the ditch and died.
Olaf Kraak AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 6:56 am

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The Two-Way
8:04 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Tepid Reception To Windows 8 Blamed For Drop In PC Sales

Visitors tried out Windows 8 last month at the 2013 CeBIT technology trade fair in Hanover, Germany.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 1:21 pm

Sales of new PCs plummeted nearly 14 percent globally in the first three months of the year, and much of the blame is being placed on Microsoft's new Windows 8 operating system.

International Data Corp. reported Wednesday that shipments of PCs totaled 76.3 million worldwide in the first quarter of 2013, down 13.9 percent from the same period the previous year.

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The Two-Way
7:47 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Why Does Anyone Care About Minutes Of Weeks-Old Fed Meetings?

The Federal Reserve's headquarters in Washington, D.C. What goes on inside there is of intense interest to investors.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 9:30 am

There's been a bit of a brouhaha over the Federal Reserve's inadvertent early release Tuesday evening of minutes from its closed-door March 19-20 policy meeting.

As The Associated Press writes, "employees at JPMorgan Chase, Goldman Sachs Group, Wells Fargo and Citigroup were among those to receive [the] market-sensitive information."

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Shots - Health News
7:06 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Why Obama's Budget Could Make Health Waves

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius (center), flanked by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Acting Administrator Marilyn Tavenner (left) and Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Margaret Hamburg, speaks during a budget briefing in Washington on Wednesday.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 12:16 pm

OK, the conventional wisdom about the budget President Obama sent to Congress yesterday is that's irrelevant.

It's two months late, after all, and the House and Senate have already approved their own spending blueprints for fiscal 2014.

But here's why it matters when it comes to health.

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Politics
6:53 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Paul Ryan Talks About The President's 2014 Budget

The House of Representative Budget Committee chairman Paul Ryan says he sees hope for a bipartisan budget agreement for the first time since President Obama came to office.

The Two-Way
6:51 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Japanese Car Makers Recall Millions Of Vehicles Over Faulty Airbags

The 2002 Toyota Corolla. At least some of them are subject to recall.
Jeff Kowalsky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 10:14 am

Some 3.4 million vehicles produced by four Japanese automakers are being voluntarily recalled due to faulty airbag inflators.

The inflators were installed in some of Toyota's top-selling Camry and Corolla models produced since 2000. Certain Honda Civics and Mazdas are also subject to recall, which also reportedly includes the Maxima and Cube, according to Reuters.

The defective passenger-side airbag inflators were produced by Tokyo-based Takata at a Mexican plant, Reuters says.

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The Two-Way
5:52 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Jobless Claims Fell Sharply Last Week

Many Americans hope to see more signs like this in coming months. (Photo taken earlier this year in San Rafael, Calif.)
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 8:52 am

There were 346,000 first-time claims for unemployment benefits, down 42,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration reports.

Meanwhile, the "4-week moving average" of claims was 358,000, up by 3,000 from the previous week's 355,000. That measure smooths out some of the volatility in the numbers.

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The Two-Way
5:29 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Shark! Fisherman Gets Quite A Scare, Catches Scene On Video

Isaac Brumaghim had his video recorder running when a tiger shark came by and grabbed his catch.
YouTube.com/AQAHNTR

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 10:31 am

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The Two-Way
5:21 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Will North Korea Claim Victory And Stand Down?

On Wednesday, a North Korean soldier looked on from the banks of the Yalu River on the border with China.
Wang Zhao AFP/Getty Images
  • From 'Morning Edition': Frank Langfitt and David Greene discuss the latest news from the Korean peninsula

As the world waits for what's expected to be another ballistic missile test by North Korea sometime in the next few days, NPR's Frank Langfitt reports there's reason to think that tensions on the Korean Peninsula might soon ease.

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The Two-Way
5:03 am
Thu April 11, 2013

'He Saved Hundreds': Army Chaplain Gets Medal Of Honor

In this copy of a photograph on display at Kapaun Mt. Carmel Catholic High School in Wichita, Kan., a wounded soldier is helped by Army chaplain Emil Kapaun (on the soldier's left) during the Korean War. The Kansas native died a prisoner of war in 1951.
Mike Hutmacher MCT/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 8:15 pm

It took more than 60 years, but an Army chaplain who died as a prisoner during the Korean War will be awarded the Medal of Honor by President Obama on Thursday.

Capt. Emil Kapaun was a Catholic priest serving with the 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division who died at age 35 in 1951. And he's not only a war hero — the Catholic Church is also looking into whether he should be made a saint.

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