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The Two-Way
11:43 am
Thu July 25, 2013

William And Kate Took 2 Days. How Long Can You Wait To Name A Baby?

Stumped on what to call the baby? Some places give you more time to decide than others.
EHStock iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:40 pm

With their announcement of His Royal Highness Prince George of Cambridge, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge wasted little time putting to rest speculation about the name of the U.K.'s newest royal. (And that speculation was rife — bookies in the United Kingdom had been doing brisk business on baby name wagers for weeks.)

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NPR Story
11:08 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Award-Winning Novel On Asian American Artists

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:55 pm

In “The Collective,” writer Don Lee tells the story of three Asian Americans who meet at college and eventually form an artists’ collective in Cambridge, Mass.

The novel is a meditation on friendship and what it means to be Asian and an artist in the United States.

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NPR Story
11:08 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Remembering Faye Hunter Of 'Let's Active'

Faye Hunter, the founding bassist of Let's Active. (Facebook)

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:55 pm

Everybody knows R.E.M. but there were so many other southern bands that played the sort of jangly guitar pop that the boys from Athens, Georgia, made famous.

One of my favorites was Let’s Active, formed by Mitch Easter, Sara Romweber and Faye Hunter in 1981.

Any band that can produce a song like “Every Dog Has His Day” is OK in my book.

Well, Faye Hunter, who played bass and sang in Let’s Active, died on July 21, apparently a suicide.

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The Two-Way
10:39 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Cowboys Stadium No More: With Deal, It Is Now AT&T Stadium

The sun sets behind Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas.
Ronald Martinez Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:30 pm

After what is rumored to be a multimillion-dollar naming deal, the iconic Cowboys Stadium will be called AT&T Stadium from now on.

In a press release, AT&T said part of its attraction to the deal was that Dallas is the company's home. Cowboys owner Jerry Jones said in a statement that the naming deal ties the team with "one of the world's strongest and most innovative companies."

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Parallels
10:39 am
Thu July 25, 2013

What's In A Domain Name? A Lot, Countries Say

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:48 pm

India doesn't want .ram.

France objects to .vin.

Brazil opposes .amazon; and China, .shangrila.

Those are the proposed top-level domain names that some companies want. But several countries have complained, according to the world body that assigns them.

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Health Care
10:37 am
Thu July 25, 2013

For Bioethicist With Ailing Spouse, End-Of-Life Issues Hit Home

Margaret Battin's husband, Brooke Hopkins, was left quadriplegic after he collided with an oncoming bicycle while cycling down a hill in Salt Lake City.
Courtesy of The New York Times

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 1:14 pm

After writing books and essays about end-of-life issues, and advocating for the right to die, bioethicist Margaret Battin is wrestling with the issue in her own family. Her husband, Brooke Hopkins, an English professor at the University of Utah, where she also teaches, broke his neck in a bicycle accident in 2008, leaving him with quadriplegia and dependent on life support technology. In order to breathe, he requires a ventilator some of the time and a diaphragmatic pacer all the time. He receives his nutrition through a feeding tube.

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Author Interviews
10:37 am
Thu July 25, 2013

A Metro 'Revolution': Cities, Suburbs Do What Washington Can't

Philanthropic and business leaders have come together to revive the core of Detroit, which recently filed for federal bankruptcy protection.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:47 pm

When Detroit filed for federal bankruptcy protection last week, news accounts were filled with troubling stories of urban decay in the city: vast areas of vacant lots and abandoned houses, shuttered parks, nonworking streetlights and police response times close to an hour.

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The Two-Way
10:34 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Heads Roll At TV Station That Broadcast Bogus Pilots Names

KTVU broadcast the bogus names. We've blocked them out because they're offensive.
YouTube.com screen grab (edited to remove offensive material)

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 1:40 pm

Three of the station's staffers who were at work when KTVU-TV of Oakland broadcast obviously bogus and incredibly offensive names of what it said were the pilots of Asiana Flight 214 have been dismissed and more departures may soon follow.

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The Two-Way
10:32 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Teen Passengers Rescued As Tall Ship Sinks Off Irish Coast

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 1:34 pm

All hands from the tall ship Astrid were safe on Thursday after the vessel, with nearly two dozen teenagers aboard, ran aground on the rocky south coast of Ireland.

The Astrid, a 136-foot, two-masted Dutch training ship, issued a "mayday" on Wednesday after it ran up on the rocks near Kinsale, County Cork, prompting what the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, or RNLI, described as a major air and sea rescue.

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Business
9:18 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Government Charges SAC In Insider Trading Case

Federal prosecutors have filed criminal charges against one of the most famous and successful hedge funds in the world. The government alleges that SAC Capital Advisors is criminally responsible for insider trading that went on at the firm.

The Two-Way
9:17 am
Thu July 25, 2013

House Republicans Back End To Door-Side Mail Service

This "curbside" delivery would remain, but "door-to-door" service would end under a new proposal.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:12 pm

The age-old standoff between mail carrier and Canis familiaris could be coming to an end if the latest plan to save the Postal Service goes ahead.

The proposal, approved by a House committee on Wednesday, would end door-to-door delivery by 2022. Instead, postal carriers would limit their deliveries to curbside — meaning boxes at the end of driveways — or to cluster boxes, a staple of many apartment complexes.

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The Two-Way
9:16 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Fire Going Out, Gas Leak Blocked At Gulf Of Mexico Rig

"Natural gas has stopped flowing to a drilling rig on fire in the Gulf of Mexico," NPR's Jeff Brady tells our Newscast Desk.

As he reports:

"A drilling crew lost control of the well on Tuesday, then gas escaping from the well caught fire. No one was injured, but the flames heavily damaged a drilling rig owned by Houston-based Hercules Offshore.

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The Salt
9:14 am
Thu July 25, 2013

The FDA Doesn't Want Chickens To Explore The Great Outdoors

Free-range chickens feed in a pasture on an organic farm in Illinois.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:51 pm

Organic egg farmers are divided in their reaction to a new FDA proposal that's intended to reduce the risk of salmonella infection among free-roaming chickens. They even disagree about what the document, called "Guidance for Industry," actually requires.

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Shots - Health News
9:10 am
Thu July 25, 2013

How Midwives Have Become Critical In War Zones

A midwife holds a newborn at Rabia Balkhi Women's Hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan.
Jonathan Saruk International Medical Corps

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 4:24 pm

  • Listen to midwife Emily Slocum describe delivering babies in the dark, with no running water.

In a conflict zone, getting the basics — food, water, shelter — is a constant challenge. And it likely involves being on the move.

Now imagine pregnancy. There might not be a functioning medical facility for miles. And the environment makes the woman and her baby more susceptible to complications.

Aid groups are increasingly relying on conflict midwives to help women in these situations. In dangerous and unstable regions, midwives' jobs are more than delivering babies: They often have to help women who have experienced sexual violence and have reproductive health issues.

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Music
9:06 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Hip-Hop Sign Language Is Hard Work

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 1:00 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE: This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee, Michel Martin is away. Coming up, having honest conversations about race can require a lot of patience, but the writer behind the "Yo, Is This Racist?" blog says there's value in getting angry and even profane in those debates.

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Politics
9:06 am
Thu July 25, 2013

White House Talks Income Gap: New Ideas About Old Problems?

President Obama's economic speaking tour seems reminiscent of campaign speeches in 2008. Guest host Celeste Headlee asks NPR's Ron Elving why the White House is sending this message again.

The Two-Way
8:31 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Reports: Virginia Johnson, Of 'Masters & Johnson' Fame, Dies

Virginia Johnson and her then-husband, William Masters, in 1972. They studied sexual behavior for decades. She died this week in St. Louis. Masters died in 2001.
AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 8:40 am

"Virginia Johnson, one half of the famed Masters and Johnson research team on human sexual behavior, has died at the age of 88, her son, Scott, tells St. Louis Public Radio."

The station adds that "Johnson was a resident of The Altenheim [a retirement home] in St. Louis, and the facility has also confirmed her death."

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The Two-Way
8:02 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Feds Charge SAC Capital In Insider Trading Case

Former SAC portfolio manager Michael Steinberg (center) exits a Manhattan federal court with his attorney after his indictment on securities fraud charges in March.
Louis Lanzano AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 8:29 am

Federal officials in New York City have charged SAC Capital Advisors with insider trading, the culmination of a protracted investigation into the hedge fund founded by embattled billionaire Steven Cohen.

SAC is charged with one count of wire fraud and four counts of securities fraud in connection with alleged insider trading by "numerous employees" at "various times between in or about 1999 through at least in or about 2010," according to the indictment.

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The Two-Way
7:42 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Big Coup For One Of The Big Three: Impala Called Best Sedan

The 2014 Chevrolet Impala, which Consumer Reports says its better than its foreign rivals.
Justin Lane EPA /Landov

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 8:12 am

The city of Detroit may be on the skids financially, but one of its traditional "big three" automakers just scored a big win.

For the first time since it began making such comparisons between sedans in 1992, Consumer Reports magazine has given its top rating to a model made by a U.S. automaker — not one made by a European or Japanese company.

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The Two-Way
5:49 am
Thu July 25, 2013

Jobless Claims Rose Last Week; Key Orders Up In June

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:04 am

There were 343,000 first-time claims filed for unemployment insurance last week, the Employment and Training Administration says. That was up from an estimated 336,000 the week before.

The increase is from what had been a 10-week low. But basically, claims have been ranging between the mid-330,000s and mid-370,000s all year. Like other employment indicators, the jobless claims figures have been signalling that job growth remains modest.

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