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The Salt
2:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Palm Oil In The Food Supply: What You Should Know

Much of the palm oil imported into the U.S. ends up in snack foods such as cookies, crackers and microwave popcorn.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:42 pm

Remember the battle over trans fats? Yeah, the fats that did our hearts no favors.

As we've reported, the push to get these cholesterol-raising fats out of the food supply has been pretty successful. And now most packaged snacks are labeled as having zero grams of trans fat.

So what are food manufacturers using instead? One alternative is palm oil. But it's not an ideal replacement.

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Law
2:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Federal Case Pits Wounded Warrior Against FBI

Former Army Ranger Justin Slaby is suing the FBI, claiming he was unfairly dismissed from agent training because of his prosthetic hand.
Courtesy of Butler & Harris

Army Ranger Justin Slaby served two tours in Iraq and one in Afghanistan. While he was back in the U.S. preparing to deploy for a fourth tour, his left hand was blown off by a faulty grenade in a training accident. After being fitted with a state-of-the-art prosthesis, Slaby was encouraged by one of his doctors to try for a career in the FBI. What happened next has landed the ex-Ranger and the FBI in court and already tarnished the career of a high-ranking agent.

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Movie Interviews
2:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

'In A World ...' Is A Comedy About, You Guessed It, Voice-Over Artists

Lake Bell was born Lake Siegel Bell. Her father is named Harvey Siegel, but she says her mother got the last name in the divorce settlement.
Seamus Tierney

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 2:50 pm

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Science
2:43 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

If You Want A Doughnut Hole, Don't Ask A Mathematician

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 8:27 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

A program such as ours is timed to the exact second, and occasionally, there are small holes when our mix of news and features doesn't quite fill up our two-hour slot.

So NPR's Joe Palca offered to come to our rescue with some short math and sciencey hole-filling stories, stories about what else - holes.

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The Two-Way
2:20 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

North Carolina Set To Compensate Forced Sterilization Victims

Sterilization victim Lela Dunston, 63 (seated front), following a meeting of the Governor's Eugenics Compensation Task Force in North Carolina in 2012.
Karen Tam AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:31 pm

North Carolina could become the first state to compensate people who were forcibly sterilized in programs across the country that began during the Great Depression and continued for decades, targeting individuals deemed feeble-minded or otherwise unfit.

In a proposed budget, lawmakers have set aside $10 million for one-time payments to an estimated 1,500 people still alive who were part of a state program that sterilized 7,600 men, women and children from 1929 to 1974. The amount of each payout would be determined by how many people came forward.

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All Tech Considered
1:59 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

The Reply To Email Overload? Prioritize — Or Turn It Off

Steven Cohen, the billionaire hedge fund manager of SAC Capital Advisors, didn't see a key email because he gets 1,000 messages a day, his lawyers say.
Jenny Boyle AP

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 4:33 am

In the high-profile civil case against Wall Street titan Steven Cohen, federal authorities accuse the hedge fund head of allowing insider trading within his ranks. Cohen's lawyers offered up a defense fit for the digital age: They claim he didn't see a key, incriminating email because he gets too many messages — an estimated 1,000 a day, and opens only 11 percent of them.

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The Two-Way
1:47 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

In Pictures: Pope Visits Brazilian Favela

Pope Francis speaks during a gathering with Argentine youths at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Rio de Janeiro, on Thrusday. Pope Francis urged young Brazilians not to despair in the battle against corruption Thursday as he addressed their country's political problems in the wake of massive protests.
Nelson Almeida AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 4:01 pm

During the fourth day of his first foreign visit, Pope Francis headed to the Varginha favela in Rio de Janeiro.

As NPR's Lourdes Garcia Navarro described it to our Newscast unit, the shantytown was not prettied up for the pope. Its river remained clogged with sewage and dirt, and the houses were still slapped together.

"It's an extremely poor community," Lourdes said. "I think the pope wanted to come here to highlight his very personal message of affinity with the poor."

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Code Switch
1:37 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Key Witness Against Emmett Till's Killers Led A Quiet Life

Willie Reed (right) testified against the men accused of murdering 14-year-old Emmett Till in 1955. He changed his last name to Louis after fleeing to Chicago and hardly spoke of the trial.
Charles Knoblock AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 2:43 pm

Willie Louis may be one of the most celebrated but least-known figures in a pivotal point in American history: He testified against the men accused of kidnapping and murdering 14-year-old Emmett Till. He died July 18, but his wife, Juliet, announced his death this week.

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The Salt
1:05 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Catch Of The Day, Grilled The Turkish Way

Anglers fish off Galata Bridge in Istanbul in 2011. The bridge is within site of the modest waterside restaurant Akin Balik.
Bulent Kilic AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 7:17 pm

Each morning as dawn breaks over the Bosphorus Strait in Turkey, a small drama repeats itself: Massive oil tankers and cargo ships slide past tiny fishing boats bobbing on the surface like bathtub toys.

These intrepid fishermen are out in all weather, in all seasons. In the winter, they catch the rich, oily anchovies, bluefish and mackerel. With spring come the turbot and sea bream, and by summer, sea bass and red mullet are being hawked by the fishmongers.

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NPR Story
12:52 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

An Argument Against Standing Desks

(Pace McCulloch)

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:55 pm

One office worker says he enjoys sitting and he’s tired of the “superior moral attitude” from the standers around him.

Writer Ben Crair told Here & Now he accepts the medical studies showing that sitting at your desk is bad for your health. His objection to standing is based on “the pure satisfaction I get from sitting,” he said.

He argues there are other solutions to the health problem of sitting too long.

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NPR Story
12:52 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

New Alzheimer's Research Could Lead To Treatments

Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, puts her hand on the arm of resident Catherine Peake, in Washington, Feb. 6, 2012. (Charles Dharapak/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:55 pm

A new report in the journal Nature shows a significant step forward in figuring out what causes things to go wrong in the brain early on in Alzheimer’s disease.

The research could lead to new treatments.

More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, and that number is projected to triple by 2050. So there’s urgent demand for treatments — or even better, a cure — but so far, there has been little progress on that front.

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NPR Story
12:52 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

DREAMer Hopes For Full Citizenship

Renata Teodoro is pictured in the Here & Now studios. (Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:55 pm

As a child, 25-year-old Renata Teodoro was brought to the U.S. from Brazil by her parents, who lived and worked in the Boston area until her father’s asylum application was denied and her mother was deported.

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The Two-Way
12:44 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

In Closing Arguments, Prosecutors Portray Manning As Reckless

Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning attach banners to the perimeter fence of Fort Meade in Maryland, where Manning is facing a military trial.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 1:41 pm

Pfc. Bradley Manning acted recklessly when he released a massive cache of classified information, prosecutors said during closing arguments at his military trial in Fort Meade in Maryland today.

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It's All Politics
12:37 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Pelosi Says Weiner Should 'Get A Clue'; Popularity Dives In NYC

Huma Abedin (right) glances at her husband, New York City mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner, as he speaks at a press conference Tuesday.
Kathy Willens AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 4:48 pm

(Updated 6:50 p.m. EDT)

Democrat Anthony Weiner's path to the New York City mayor's office got a lot more complicated Thursday, just two days after he asserted that new revelations of his lewd online conduct would not chase him from the race for his party's nomination.

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Food
12:10 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

When Asian And Latin Food Collide: Spicy, Tasty Or Confused?

Green beans with peanuts and chile de arbol
Courtesy Pati Jinich

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 11:20 am

Asian-Americans and Latinos trace their roots half a world away from each other — literally. But their cultures, and especially the foods they love, have more in common than you might think. These days, they're colliding in new and interesting ways – from Korean barbecue taco trucks to finer dining.

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Monkey See
12:07 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Rob Lowe On Playing JFK Without Sounding Like You're On 'The Simpsons'

Rob Lowe as John F. Kennedy in the National Geographic Channel's film, Killing Kennedy.
National Geographic Channel

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 4:51 pm

The National Geographic Channel is a little all over the place when it comes to their programming. There's some nature material, there's some fairly sensational reality stuff (Doomsday Preppers, for instance), and there are historical documentaries and, sometimes, historical scripted films.

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NPR Story
12:01 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Gas Well Blowout Raises Concerns About Drilling Safety

In this Wednesday, July 24, 2013 photo released by the U.S. Coast Guard, abatement efforts underway near Hercules 265 Rig where fire has caused collapse of the drill floor and derrick following an explosion Tuesday night. (U.S. Coast Guard via AP)

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:55 pm

A natural gas well explosion in the Gulf of Mexico is reviving concerns about drilling safety, three years after the Deepwater Horizon explosion led to the biggest offshore oil spill in U.S. history.

Forty-four crew members were evacuated Tuesday morning after the well blew out in shallow water, some 55 miles off the coast of Louisiana.

While the cause of the blowout is still under investigation, a key safety measure failed on the rig.

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NPR Story
12:01 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Oakland Father Reflects On 'Fruitvale Station'

This film publicity image shows a scene from "Fruitvale Station." (Ron Koeberer/The Weinstein Company via AP)

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 11:08 am

Jack Bryson’s two sons were on the train platform on New Year’s Day in 2009 when Oscar Grant III was shot by a transit police officer in Oakland, Calif.

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NPR Story
12:01 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Story Update: A Victory In Fight To Overhaul Penn Station

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:55 pm

There’s an update on a story Here & Now brought you in May, about the fate of New York City’s Pennsylvania Station.

On Wednesday, the New York City Council voted to limit Madison Square Garden’s permit to 10 years. Right now, the Garden sits on top of Penn Station.

With this decision, the stadium will have to find another spot. That’s great news to a couple of activists who said Penn Station was in need of a serious overhaul.

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Parallels
11:50 am
Thu July 25, 2013

For American Defectors To Russia, An Unhappy History

Lee Harvey Oswald, the assassin of President Kennedy in 1963, had defected to the Soviet Union several years earlier, but returned to the U.S. after becoming disillusioned with that country. He is shown here in a Dallas police station after his arrest for Kennedy's shooting.
AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:52 pm

If NSA leaker Edward Snowden is allowed to leave the Moscow airport and enter Russia, as some news reports suggest, he'll join a fairly small group of Americans who have sought refuge there.

So how did it work out for the others?

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