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Parallels
5:05 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Group Faults Apple For Labor Violations At China Supplier

Apple is under fire again for labor violations at its supplier's factories in China.
Eugene Hoshiko AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 8:53 am

There's been concern about working conditions at factories run by Apple's foreign suppliers since the story last year about Foxconn. At the time, the tech giant moved to address those concerns to show that it took them seriously. But more allegations surfaced Monday centering on Apple's effort to build a cheaper iPhone.

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The Two-Way
4:57 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Italian Investigators Search For Cause Of Deadly Tour Bus Crash

Rescuers prepare coffins for victims of a bus crash in southern Italy. At least 38 people died after a bus plunged off a highway and into a ravine.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 9:10 am

Investigators in southern Italy are examining the scene a day after a bus carrying nearly 50 people plummeted off a highway and into a ravine east of Naples. Italian news agencies say at least 38 people died Sunday night after the bus crashed through a guardrail and fell nearly 100 feet to the rough terrain below.

The crash injured at least 10 people, including people who were in cars the bus hit before it left the roadway. Several children are believed to be among the wounded.

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The Two-Way
4:15 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Barrage Of Car Bombings Kills Dozens In Iraq

Iraqis walk past a wall that a car bomb destroyed, next to the Ahl al-Bayya' mosque in southeastern Baghdad Monday. At least 10 bombings were reported in the city today.
Ali Al-Saadi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 7:22 am

More than a dozen car bombs exploded in Iraq early Monday, killing more than 50 people in Baghdad and other areas. At least 10 explosions were reported in the Iraqi capital during the morning rush hour.

Monday's bombings wounded more than 100 people, the BBC reports.

"Police and medical sources said the attacks, which appeared to be coordinated, were concentrated on towns and cities in Iraq's predominantly Shi'ite south," Reuters reports, "and districts of the capital where Shi'ites reside."

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Code Switch
4:03 am
Mon July 29, 2013

More About The 40-Year-Old Picture That Makes People Smile

This 1973 photo of five children playing in a Detroit suburb has gone viral on the Internet. The children were Rhonda Shelly, 3 (from left), Kathy Macool, 7, Lisa Shelly, 5, Chris Macool, 9, and Robert Shelly, 6.
Joe Crachiola Courtesy of The Macomb Daily

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 6:13 am

About 10 days ago, we posted a story about an almost 40 year-old photo that was taken by Joseph Crachiola. A former news photographer in the Detroit suburb of Mount Clemens, Mich., Crachiola had happened upon five children playing not far from his newsroom at the Macomb Daily and shot the above photo.

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Animals
2:31 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Putin Puckers Up For 46-Pound Pike In Video

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 4:07 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Russian President Vladimir Putin is known for getting out and experiencing the great outdoors. All of his pursuits are meticulously documented by the media. He's ridden horseback shirtless, tranquilized a tiger, plunged into a lake in a submarine, and led migrating birds in a motorized glider.

Animals
2:27 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Texas' Two-Headed Turtle Is Facebook Friendly

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 4:07 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

In Texas, ThelmaandLouise is a big draw - not the movie. ThelmaandLouise, one word, is the name of a two-headed turtle born at the San Antonio Zoo last month. The Texas cooter is so popular, she has her own Facebook page and more than 1,700 friends. Her page says she - or they - is interested in meeting Maryland Terrapins and sea turtles. Double dating?

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
1:27 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Encore: 'Fosters' Puts A Twist On The Old Family Drama

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 4:07 am

A new show on ABC Family follows a family with one biological kid, two adopted kids and a new addition, a teenage foster kid. Given how fostering is such an inherently dramatic situation, why hasn't this ever been the premise of a TV show before? (This story originally aired on All Things Considered on June 3, 2013.)

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NPR Story
1:27 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Mali Holds First Vote Following Unrest

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 4:07 am

Linda Wertheimer talks with Rukmini Callimachi, West Africa bureau chief for The Associated Press, about Sunday's elections in Mali, the first democratic vote there since French troops pushed Islamist militants out of the north of that country.

NPR Story
1:27 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Hunger Strikes Lead To Changes In California Prison Units

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 4:07 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It is the toughest unit in the toughest prison in California and one of the toughest in the country. The security housing unit at Pelican Bay prison is home to convicts who, along with their largely violent crimes, are suspected of being part of California's ruthless prison gangs, gangs that hurt and kill in prison and control all kinds of illegal activity inside.

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Energy
12:00 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Massive Solar Plant A Stepping Stone For Future Projects

The Ivanpah solar project in California's Mojave Desert will be the largest solar power plant of its kind in the world.
Josh Cassidy KQED

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 9:33 am

The largest solar power plant of its kind is about to turn on in California's Mojave Desert.

The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System will power about 140,000 homes and will be a boon to the state's renewable energy goals, but it was no slam dunk. Now, California is trying to bring conservationists and energy companies together to create a smoother path for future projects.

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Around the Nation
12:00 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Miami Beach Preservationists Battle Glitterati Over Homes

This house owned by a plastic surgeon and his wife, a cast member on The Real Housewives of Miami, is the poster child for efforts to stop runaway demolitions in Miami Beach.
Courtesy of Arthur Marcus

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 9:35 am

Some of Miami Beach's quietest and most historic neighborhoods can be found in a chain of small islands connected by a causeway. On Di Lido Island, a community of homes built 50 and 60 years ago is being torn down and replaced, lot by lot. On one street alone, five houses currently are slated for demolition.

Daniel Ciraldo stands across the street from two '60s-era houses that will soon be demolished and replaced by a new home nearly double their combined size.

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The Salt
11:59 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

Two-Day Diets: How Mini Fasts Can Help Maximize Weight Loss

People following a 5-2 diet would eat lean protein and non-starchy vegetables two days a week.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 6:34 am

This is not a detox diet. Nor is it an extreme version of calorie restriction.

Nope, the strategy of so-called 5-2 diets is to endure two days a week of mini-fasting.

This doesn't mean starving yourself. Rather, it entails reducing your calorie intake during two days of the week down to somewhere in the range of 500 to 1,000 calories.

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Shots - Health News
11:59 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

How To Find A Path Off The Dreaded Diet Plateau

Illustration by Tim Robinson for NPR

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 9:12 am

Chances are that if you've ever lost weight following a strict diet and exercise regimen, you've also reached the diet plateau. On that lonely plateau, pounds never seem to melt away, no matter how hard you try to shed them.

You're not alone. Consider the plight of Susan Carierre. When the 5-foot-6-inch Carriere hit 230 pounds, she decided to enroll in a weight-loss program at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center near her home in Baton Rouge, La.

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The Record
3:36 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

Paying The Piper: Music Streaming Services In Perspective

Thom Yorke of Radiohead and Atoms for Peace is one of many musicians concerned with Spotify's small royalty payments.
isifa Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 1:31 pm

As sales of recorded music continue to plummet, the concept of fans "owning" music may soon be considered old-fashioned. Today, it's all about access to music, rather than ownership of an album or a song, and newer streaming services like Spotify are at the center of the storm.

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Health Care
3:24 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

High-Deductible Health Plans, Gamble For Some, On The Rise

Near the end of last year, a big finance company in Charlotte, N.C., was doing what a lot of other businesses have been doing recently: switching up their health care offerings.

"Everything was changing, and we would only be offered two choices and each were a high-deductible plan," says Marty Metzl, whose husband works for the company.

High-deductible plans are the increasingly common kind of health insurance that have cheaper premiums than traditional plans, but they put you on the hook for thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket costs before the insurance kicks in.

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Book Reviews
2:39 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

A Touching, 'Telling' Book About Cheese

Michael Paterniti is also the author of Driving Mr. Albert: A Trip Across America with Einstein's Brain.
Joanna Eldredge Morrissey

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 3:24 pm

The first thing you should know: This is not a book about cheese. I mean, it is — and a famous, award-winning cheese at that, a Spanish sheep's milk cheese called the Páramo de Guzmán that cost $22 per pound in 1991. A cheese so good, the king of Spain himself couldn't get enough of it.

But this book is far more about its makers — the cheesemaker himself, an enormous and enormously charming Castilian named Ambrosio, and the book's maker, journalist and author Michael Paterniti, who basically falls in love with Ambrosio at first sight.

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Author Interviews
1:58 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

'Looking For Palestine': A Once-Split Identity Becomes Whole

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 5:46 am

Actress Najla Said is a Palestinian-Lebanese-American Christian, but growing up in New York City, her identity was anything but clearly defined.

The daughter of prominent literary critic Edward Said, she spent her childhood in one of the most influential intellectual households in America. Edward Said, who died in 2003, was a renowned professor at Columbia University and was critical to defining Palestinian independence.

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The Two-Way
1:47 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

Israel, Palestinians To Restart Talks In Washington

Israeli Justice Minister Tzipi Livni during a meeting with Secretary of State John Kerry at the U.S. Ambassador's residence in Rome in May.
Mladen Antonov AFP/Getty Images

Israeli and the Palestinian negotiators will sit down to peace talks in Washington on Monday, picking up from where they left off five years ago, the State Department says.

Secretary of State John Kerry has personally extended an invitation to Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to send senior negotiating teams to the U.S. capital "to formally resume direct final status negotiations," spokesperson Jen Psaki said.

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Music Interviews
1:37 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

AlunaGeorge Finds A Natural Groove, By Accident

George Reid and Aluna Francis have become darlings of the European music festival circuit without releasing an album. Body Talk, their full-length debut as AlunaGeorge, is out Monday.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 12:54 pm

If it weren't for a MySpace message three years ago, singer Aluna Francis and producer George Reid might never have joined to form AlunaGeorge.

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Science
1:36 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

'Batman' Style: How We Can See With Sound, Too

Echolocation is second nature to animals such as bats and dolphins. Can humans also find their way using sound as a tool?
Ian Waldie Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 8:30 am

Birds do it. Bats do it. Now even educated people do it. Echolocation is the process used by certain animals to identify what lies ahead of them, by emitting sounds that bounce off objects.

Now a team of researchers has created an algorithm that could give the rest of us a chance to see with sound.

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