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11:52 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Song Of The Week: 'Animals'

The band The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger consists of Sean Lennon and his girlfriend and fellow musician Charlotte Kemp Muhl. (Courtesy of the artist)

NPR music writer and editor Stephen Thompson introduces Here & Now’s Robin Young to the song “Animals” by the band The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger.

The band consists of John Lennon’s son, Sean Lennon, and his girlfriend and fellow musician Charlotte Kemp Muhl.

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The Two-Way
11:41 am
Mon April 21, 2014

You Can Survive A Flight In A Jet's Wheel Well, But Probably Won't

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 6:13 am

The amazing story of a 16-year-old California boy who the FBI says survived a 5 1/2-hour flight in the frigid wheel well of a jet that flew from San Jose to Hawaii on Sunday raises a logical question:

How does one survive a trip like that when the temperature would have dropped to more than 50 degrees below zero and the air would have been thinner than that at the top of Mount Everest?

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Mon April 21, 2014

U.N. Reports Hundreds Killed In Ethnic Violence In South Sudan

South Sudanese fleeing an attack on the town of Rank, on Saturday. The United Nations says when rebels seized the town of Bentiu, south of Rank, earlier this month, hundreds became victims of ethnically targeted killings.
Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 1:13 pm

The United Nations Mission in South Sudan says that "targeted killings of civilians" based on ethnicity were carried out in the war-torn country after rebels last week seized the city of Bentiu.

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Pop Culture
11:14 am
Mon April 21, 2014

For Comic Hari Kondabolu, Explaining The Joke IS The Joke

he says. "You were a minority when you came to this country. Things seemed to have worked out for you."" href="/post/comic-hari-kondabolu-explaining-joke-joke" class="noexit lightbox">
Comic Hari Kondabolu's album Waiting for 2042 is a reference to the year the Census Bureau projects whites will be the minority in the U.S. "Don't worry, white people," he says. "You were a minority when you came to this country. Things seemed to have worked out for you."
Kyle Johnson

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 1:23 pm

At first, Hari Kondabolu's comedy was mostly about catharsis: "I was doing some work in detention centers and meeting families who had family members who were going to be deported," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "It was really powerful work ... but it was incredibly hard and performing at night was a relief. It was cathartic. It was just a way to get things out."

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Parallels
10:45 am
Mon April 21, 2014

For Extremists In Syria, Extortion Brings Piles Of Cash From Iraq

Rebel fighters inspect the wreckage of a Syrian army helicopter after the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS, allegedly destroyed it in March in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo.
Mohammed Al-Khatieb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 4:26 pm

The renegade Islamist group known as ISIS now controls swaths of Syria and Iraq, and it's partly because the fighters are so rich. ISIS, or the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, is known for having the biggest guns and paying the highest salaries.

While kidnapping, oil smuggling and donations from sympathizers have been well-known sources of money, the groups also run complex and brutal protection rackets, according to analysts.

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All Tech Considered
10:19 am
Mon April 21, 2014

America's Less Religious: Study Puts Some Blame On The Internet

iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 9:03 am

America is less religious than ever before. The number of Americans who reported no religious affiliation has been growing rapidly, doubling since 1990. That kind of rapid change matches another societal trend — growth in Internet use. The percentage of Americans who say they used the Internet went from nearly zero in 1990 to 87 percent this year.

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The Two-Way
9:42 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Parents Say 234 Girls Are Missing From School In Nigeria

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 12:23 pm

Disturbing news from Nigeria about girls kidnapped last week from their school by Islamist extremists grew even more distressing on Monday when parents told authorities that 234 of the young women are still missing.

That's nearly triple the number — 85 — that officials have been reporting.

According to The Associated Press:

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The Salt
9:41 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Hunger Games: College Athletes Make Play For Collective Bargaining

Shabazz Napier of the Connecticut Huskies speaks to the media in the locker room after defeating Kentucky in the NCAA men's championship on April 7.
Jamie Squire Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 4:36 pm

When University of Connecticut star basketball player Shabazz Napier told reporters right after winning the NCAA Division I men's basketball national championship he sometimes went to bed hungry, you could almost hear the collective gasp from mothers around the country.

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Shots - Health News
9:41 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Lead Poisoning Nightmare In Nigeria May Be Easing

Gado Labbo holds her 5-year-old son, Yusuf, at a clinic in Dareta, Nigeria. In 2010, when Yusuf first entered the clinic, he had a blood lead level 30 times higher than the amount the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers dangerous.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 11:51 am

Children in northwestern Nigeria are no longer dying by the hundreds.

That's the promising word from Mary Jean Brown, chief of the lead poisoning prevention program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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It's All Politics
9:35 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Rand Paul Bids To Loosen Democratic Hold On African-American Vote

Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky testified last year in favor of revamping the nation's mandatory federal minimum sentencing laws.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 11:37 am

For more than a year, GOP Sen. Rand Paul has been staking out positions on issues that resonate in the black community, including school choice and prison sentencing reform. And he's been showing up in some unexpected — for a Republican — venues, including historically black colleges.

It's stirred an unusual degree of curiosity about the freshman Kentucky senator — and 2016 GOP presidential prospect — among the Democratic Party's most reliable voting bloc.

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Economy
9:27 am
Mon April 21, 2014

President Obama Will Skip China, But Asia Trip Sends A Message

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. President Obama heads overseas this week to Asia. He hopes to strengthen U.S. economic ties with that region.

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Education
9:27 am
Mon April 21, 2014

A 'Tennessee Promise' To Educate The State's College Students

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. This spring, along with NPR's Morning Edition, we're helping you navigate the higher education money maze with our "Paying for College" series.

We've heard about how college got so expensive and how families and students are taking on massive loans to pay for it. But today, we want to talk more about an effort to make college not just affordable, but free.

(SOUNDBITE OF STATE OF THE STATE ADDRESS)

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Around the Nation
9:27 am
Mon April 21, 2014

No Longer Marching Out To Work, More Mothers Stay Home

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now we want to take a closer look at women who work full-time as stay-at-home moms. We have new numbers from the Pew Research Center that show the proportion of home stay-at-home moms in the U.S. has gone up since 1999. That number had been declining since the 1960s.

But between 1999 and 2012, the percentage of moms who stayed at home rose from 23 percent to 29 percent. Joining us to talk about this is D'Vera Cohn. She's a senior writer at the Pew Research Center and an author of the new report. D'Vera, welcome.

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Digital Life
9:27 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Security Threats Hit Deeper Than Heartbleed Bug

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. You might have been hearing about the Heart Bleed bug over the past couple weeks. And if you haven't, you might want to check it out. It's important. That is the security flaw the researchers say could have compromised up to half a million websites. So maybe you changed your passwords for your online accounts by now.

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Music
9:27 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Library Of Congress, How Could You Forget Run-DMC?

Rap group Run-DMC at the second annual MTV Video Music Awards. Does the group belong in the Library of Congress?
Suriani AP

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 2:53 pm

Rap and hip-hop have been around for decades and have become one of America's most successful cultural exports.

But when the Library of Congress added new recordings to its national registry this year, none of them were hip-hop.

Tell Me More guest host Celeste Headlee discusses that with William Boone, professor in the English and African-American studies department at Winston-Salem State University. He says that hip-hop artists are used to being overlooked by the powers that be.

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It's All Politics
9:20 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Obama Seeks Wider Authority To Release Drug Offenders

President Obama signs the Fair Sentencing Act in 2010, as Attorney General Eric Holder and a bipartisan group of senators look on.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 1:17 pm

Attorney General Eric Holder announced Monday that the Obama administration is formulating new rules that would give it, and the president, far more latitude to pardon or reduce the sentences of thousands of drug offenders serving long federal prison sentences.

The move comes amid a broad national reconsideration of mandatory minimum sentences approved by Congress in 1986, when America's big cities were in the grip of a crack cocaine-fueled crime wave.

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The Two-Way
9:07 am
Mon April 21, 2014

VIDEO: Leopard Attacks Residents In Central India

Video of a leopard attacking residents in the town of Chandrapur, Maharashtra, in central India.
NDTV

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 11:17 am

You can see the video here. New Delhi Television calls it "an indication of increased conflicts between man and animal."

In the footage, a leopard is seen bursting through roof tiles of a one-story building in the central city of Chandrapur, Maharashtra, about 400 miles east of Mumbai.

NDTV says:

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The Two-Way
9:06 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Biden Visits Ukraine In Show Of U.S. Support

Ukrainian Foreign Minister Andrii Deshchytsia (center) greets Vice President Joe Biden at the airport in Kiev on Monday.
Yuriy Maksimov EPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 12:04 pm

The situation in eastern Ukraine remains on edge Monday, following a weekend of violence that reportedly left up to five pro-Russian separatists dead at the hands of Ukraine nationalists. Moscow has used the killings to press its case that Ukraine's Russian speakers are threatened and to accuse Kiev of not living up to last week's agreement on steps to ease tensions.

Here's some of the latest news from the region:

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The Two-Way
7:35 am
Mon April 21, 2014

After Tragedy, Nepalese Sherpas May Refuse To Climb Everest

Mount Everest straddles the border of Nepal and the Tibetan region of China. This is a view of the Nepalese side.
Hans Edinger AP

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 9:37 am

Friday's tragedy on Mount Everest in which at least 13 Sherpa guides were killed in an avalanche has led others among that group of Nepalese who lead foreigners up the world's tallest mountain to issue some demands — and threaten to boycott the soon-to-start climbing season if their requests aren't granted.

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The Two-Way
7:05 am
Mon April 21, 2014

As It Happened: American Wins 118th Running Of The Boston Marathon

Boylston Street's 26-mile marker will be a welcome sight to the thousands of runners who are in today's Boston Marathon. Today marks the 118th running of the race.
Jared Wickerham Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 4:11 pm

There is no doubt the bombings of last year cast a long shadow on the 118th running of the Boston Marathon.

It was an inevitable backdrop: The signs on the buildings that line the course near the finish are usually covered in witty, encouraging posters. This year, they encouraged a greater kind of perseverance.

"Boston Strong," they exhorted.

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