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Planet Money
12:25 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Why Women (Like Me) Choose Lower-Paying Jobs

Share of women in most lucrative majors
Quoctrung Bui/NPR Anthony Carnevale

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 8:01 am

The other day, I was interviewing an economist who studies the effect college majors have on peoples' income. He was telling me that women often make decisions that lead them to earn less than they otherwise might.

Women are overrepresented among majors that don't pay very well (psychology, art, comparative literature), and underrepresented in lots of lucrative majors (most fields in engineering).

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The Record
9:28 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

What Does A Song That Costs $5 Sound Like?

Cookie Marenco records musicians on a small remote recording console live at the California Audio Show in August. She'll demonstrate the quality of DSD to the audience by playing back her recording. How close will it sound to the live performance? Very close, according to people present.
Cindy Carpien

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 9:04 am

Last week, Sony Corporation announced a new line of high-end audio components that promise to deliver a better online audio experience. The announcement comes amid growing evidence that music fans are tired of the crappy sound they hear on their portable music players. Case in point is the success of Cookie Marenco's business of selling super high-definition music downloads.

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The Two-Way
3:39 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

In Iowa, Blind People Can Carry Guns In Public; Not Everyone's A Fan

A debate is taking place in Iowa over the ability of people who are legally or completely blind to carry guns in public. The issue stems from a 2011 change in the state's gun permit rules, allowing visually impaired people to carry firearms in public.

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All Tech Considered
3:11 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Key To Unlocking Your Phone? Give It The Finger(print)

Phil Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing, speaks about fingerprint security features of the new iPhone 5s Tuesday in Cupertino, Calif.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 4:54 am

The first note I sent out after Apple announced it was including a fingerprint scanner in the new iPhone 5s was to Charlie Miller.

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Around the Nation
3:05 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

New HIV Cases Spotlight Adult Film Industry's Testing System

Michael Weinstein of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation (left) at a press conference in February to introduce AB 332, a statewide bill to require condom use by adult film performers.
Bret Hartman AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 4:49 pm

Adult film production in California is now suspended after a number of performers tested positive for HIV. Four cases have been reported in the past few months, including one on Monday.

If ever there was an "I told you so moment" for the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, it's now. The organization has been campaigning for condoms to be mandatory during porn shoots. Last year, it sponsored a measure in Los Angeles County to that effect, which voters approved.

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Environment
3:05 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Dust Bowl Worries Swirl Up As Shelterbelt Buckles

A Dust Bowl farmer digs out a fence post to keep it from being buried under drifting sand in Cimarron County, Okla., in 1936.
Arthur Rothstein Library of Congress

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:39 pm

In the 1930s, the Dust Bowl ravaged crops and helped plunge the U.S. into an environmental and economic depression. Farmland in parts of Texas, Kansas, Nebraska and the Dakotas disappeared.

After the howling winds passed and the dust settled, federal foresters planted 100 million trees across the Great Plains, forming a giant windbreak — known as a shelterbelt — that stretched from Texas to Canada.

Now, those trees are dying from drought, leaving some to worry whether another Dust Bowl might swirl up again.

An Experiment That Worked

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Sports
3:05 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

NASCAR Nastiness Results In Sport's Biggest Fine Ever

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Finally this hour, NASCAR nastiness. This past Saturday, one team appeared to pull out all the stops to rig a big race. One driver spun out his car, and another took an unnecessary pit stop. Both moves helped advance their teammate to the playoffs. NASCAR fined their team - Michael Waltrip Racing - $300,000, and suspended their general manager indefinitely.

Now, this is the biggest fine in NASCAR history, according to Nate Ryan. He's a senior motorsports reporter for USA Today Sports. He joins us from Charlotte, N.C. Hey there, Nate.

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Sports
3:05 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

New Head Of Olympic Committee Faces A Number Of Challenges

The International Olympic committee (IOC) has elected a new president, Thomas Bach of Germany. He assumes leadership of an organization that faces criticism over politics, costs and what some view as its insular approach to which sports are offered during the games. The new president succeeds Jacques Rogge, who lead the IOC for 12 years.

The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Study Says America's Income Gap Widest Since Great Depression

John Moore Getty Images

The gap between the 1 percent and the 99 percent is growing, according to an analysis of IRS figures by an international group of university economists, and it hasn't been so wide since 1928.

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Code Switch
3:00 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Harlem On Their Minds: Life In America's Black Capital

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 6:38 pm

The poet Langston Hughes liked to wryly describe the Harlem Renaissance — the years from just after World War I until the Depression when black literature and art flourished, fed by an awakening racial pride — as "the period when the Negro was in vogue." Note the past tense. Two new books published Tuesday explore the blossoming of black cultural life in two different decades.

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The Salt
2:44 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Small Plates To Join Olive Garden's Never-Ending Bowls

Olive Garden's chicken scampi dish is on the regular carb-heavy menu.
AnneCN Flickr

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 6:39 am

Should you want to super-size your meal (and boost your social status in the process), plenty of American restaurant chains would be more than happy to have you dine with them. Olive Garden, for one, is currently in the middle of a "Never Ending Pasta Bowl" promotion. According to the chain's Twitter feed, it has served more than 5.3 million bowls of "unlimited" pasta with soup and salad for $9.99 since Aug. 5.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:17 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

New York City's 'People's Opera' May Face Its Final Curtain

Pamela Armstrong (left) as Alice Ford and Heather Johnson as Meg Page in New York City Opera's production of Falstaff. The so called people's opera may have to cancel its upcoming season if fundraising falls short.
Carol Rosegg New York City Opera

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 7:15 pm

There are a lot of operas that end with heroines on their deathbeds, singing one glorious aria before they die. That's what happens at the end of Anna Nicole, the controversial new work that New York City Opera is presenting at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in September. But the company's artistic director and general manager, George Steel, says it could also be City Opera's last gasp.

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NPR Story
2:17 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

In A Pickle With Chef Kathy Gunst

(Kathy Gunst/Here & Now)

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 2:07 pm

Want to use up some leftover produce? Well, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst has been noticing that fermented is in!

Not only the common bread and butter pickle, but also pickled peppers, green beans and pickled fruits like cherries and peaches. She says that making a simple refrigerator pickle is a great way to use produce because it’s so easy.

“Pickling is to cooking what maybe like a really easy paint-by-number is to making art,” Gunst said.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Apple Unveils iPhone 5S And 5C

Phil Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide product marketing, speaks on stage during the introduction of the new iPhone 5c in Cupertino, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2013. (Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP)

Apple has unveiled the latest iPhones — the 5C and 5S — and says they will replace the current iPhone 5. Apple also says its next mobile operating system, iOS 7, will be available as a free download on Sept 18.

Craig Federighi, head of software at Apple Inc., said at an event at the company’s Cupertino, Calif., headquarters that “downloading iOS 7 is like getting an all new device.”

The new system can be downloaded on the iPhone 4 and later models, as well as on the tablets beginning with the iPad 2.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Grandparents Raising Kids Hit Roadblocks In School Enrollment

Across the country, it’s becoming increasingly common for grandparents to raise their grandchildren.

That can be troublesome when these same grandparents try to enroll the children in school.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Research Shows Microbes Are Crucial To Our Health

There are trillions of microbes living in and on our bodies. Bacteria, fungi, viruses and other microorganisms. And a growing body of evidence indicates that these bugs aren’t bad for us. In fact, it looks like they’re vital for our health.

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The Two-Way
2:03 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Documents: NSA Phone Records Program Violated Court Rules

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:18 pm

The Director of National Intelligence declassified some 1,800 pages of documents today, that show that a U.S. spy program that collected the phone records of Americans ran afoul privacy rules for years.

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The Two-Way
1:54 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

In Argentina, A Winter Heat Wave Brings Record Highs

Temperatures have reached record highs in Buenos Aires this week. Here, the city's market of Plaza Dorrego in San Telmo is seen on Sunday.
Alexander Hassenstein Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 2:31 pm

It's still officially wintertime in Buenos Aires, but the city is in a record heat wave. Tuesday's high was 34.4 degrees Celsius (94 degrees Fahrenheit), the hottest temperature recorded in September since 1940, La Nacion reports.

"The unusually high temperatures are expected until tomorrow and may reach the maximum of 40 degrees," the Buenos Aires Herald reports.

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The Two-Way
1:50 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Beijing To Crack Down On Social Media 'Slanderous Rumors'

An Internet cafe in Beijing photographed last year.
Greg Baker dapd

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:15 pm

China will jail anyone caught using social media to spread "slanderous rumors" or "false information" for up to 10 years, according to a new legal interpretation of Internet restrictions, the official Xinhua news agency reports.

A court's interpretation says the spread of such rumors could automatically incur a three-year prison term, but if the post is read by 5,000 or more people and/or shared more than 500 times, the penalty could jump to 10 years in jail.

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Shots - Health News
1:24 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

FDA Ratchets Down On Prescribing Of OxyContin And Other Opioids

Drug overdose deaths have more than tripled in the U.S. since 1990. Opioid painkillers like OxyContin are the cause of three-quarters of those deaths.
Toby Talbot Associated Press

The Food and Drug Administration today took another step toward restricting use of OxyContin and other powerful and often-abused prescription pain medications.

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