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1:33 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

SEC Wants Companies To Disclose CEO-Worker Pay Ratio

The Securities and Exchange Commission's Washington DC headquarters. (Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 10:27 am

The Securities and Exchange Commission has proposed a rule that would require publicly traded companies to disclose the difference in pay between the company’s CEO and its employees.

The rule is applauded by unions and labor advocacy groups that think the transparency would help investors “identify top heavy compensation models,” according to Reuters. However, business groups oppose the measure.

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Man Who Made Nintendo Into A Video Game Empire Dies

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 4:07 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We're going to keep playing in the world of videogames now and hit pause to remember one man's life.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO GAME NOISES)

SIEGEL: Hiroshi Yamauchi.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO GAME NOISES)

SIEGEL: Yamauchi was the president of Nintendo for more than 50 years. He died Thursday in Japan, at the age of 85. Yamauchi oversaw the company's transformation, from manufacturing playing cards to producing video games. And he helped make Nintendo the household name it is today.

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Grand Theft Auto V, Out Tuesday, Already Made $800 Million

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 4:07 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

More than $800 million. That's how much money the videogame "Grand Theft Auto V" earned in just one day. The last version of the game, released back in 2008 made a measly $310 million on its opening day. "Grand Theft Auto V" is also now on track to out-earn the summer's biggest movie blockbusters in only a few days. So what's going on here? We're joined by Peter Rubin, a senior editor at Wired, to find out. Hi there, Peter.

PETER RUBIN: How are you, Audie?

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NPR Story
1:17 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Conservative Group To Young People: 'Opt Out' Of Obamacare

Linda Norman (right) and Joanna Galt, both from Florida, hold their banners during a "Exempt America from Obamacare" rally on the West Lawn of the Capitol on Sept. 10.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 4:51 pm

Not all of the action to defund and otherwise undermine the Affordable Care Act is taking place in Congress.

Outside conservative groups keep looking for new angles to attack Obamacare. The latest comes in the form of ads sponsored by Generation Opportunity — an organization for young conservatives that's backed by the billionaire political activists David and Charles Koch.

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The Two-Way
12:50 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Clicking The 'Like' Button Is Protected Speech, Court Rules

A videographer shoots the side of Facebook's Like Button logo displayed at the entrance of the Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif.
Kimihiro Hoshino AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 12:52 pm

Clicking the "Like" button on Facebook is tantamount to other forms of protected speech, a federal court decided on Wednesday. That is, clicking Like is protected by the First Amendment as a form of assembly or association.

Bloomberg reports:

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The Two-Way
12:40 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Mars Rover Data Dims Hope Of Finding Life On Red Planet

A self portrait mosaic of the Mars Curiosity Rover inside the Gale Crater.
NASA

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 4:19 pm

When the Mars Curiosity made its dramatic and first-of-its-kind landing on Mars in August of 2012, the hope was that the $2.5-billion rover could confirm what scientists had suspected: that there was life on Mars.

Today, in a paper released in the journal Science, researchers explain that if the Red Planet is harboring life, the instruments on the rover have been unable to sniff it out.

NPR's Joe Palca filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
12:32 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

FBI Chief: Gunman Was 'Wandering Around Looking For People To Shoot'

FBI Director James Comey is pictured earlier this month during his swearing-in ceremony at the Justice Department in Washington, D.C.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 5:11 am

New FBI Director Jim Comey said the man who went on a rampage at the Washington Navy Yard on Monday was "wandering around looking for people to shoot" and had no apparent rhyme or reason for killing 12 people.

In his first remarks to reporters since taking office this month, Comey said the gunman, Aaron Alexis, ran out of ammunition for his legally purchased, sawed-off shotgun, exhausting a supply in his cargo pants pocket, and then began using a Beretta wrestled from a guard he had shot.

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First Reads
11:39 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Exclusive First Read: 'From Scratch: Inside The Food Network'

Emeril Lagasse promo image
Jim Cooper AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 12:06 pm

Back in 1993, the Food Network was the Little Network that Nobody Really Thought Could. Cable TV was still, if not in its infancy, then enduring a difficult toddlerhood — no one knew what cable audiences were interested in, and no one thought a scrappy startup dedicated to food would go anywhere. Twenty years later, the doubters have been proved wrong; the Food Network is a global powerhouse that's made the names and fortunes of stars like Emeril Lagasse, Paula Deen, Guy Fieri and Rachael Ray.

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JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater
11:35 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Gregory Porter On JazzSet

Gregory Porter (center) performs with saxophonist Yohsuke Satoh at the annual Strings of Autumn International Music Festival in Prague.
Petra Hajska Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:47 am

Gregory Porter's new album, Liquid Spirit, is out this week from Blue Note. Porter is making his career in a time-tested way. With two Grammy-nominated albums from a small label named Motema Music and a lot of touring — international touring — now he's gotten himself signed to a major labor.

On this JazzSet, Porter's singing at the annual Strings of Autumn International Music Festival in Prague. The Czech audience loves him! Applause between songs is running a minute or more.

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The Two-Way
11:34 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Church Must Find Balance, Pope Says, Or Fall Like Cards

Pope Francis waves to faithful as he arrives for his weekly general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican on Wednesday.
Riccardo De Luca AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 12:12 pm

Pope Francis, in a wide-ranging interview with 16 Jesuit publications, says "the moral edifice of the church is likely to fall like a house of cards" if it continues to focus on narrow issues such as abortion, gay marriage and contraception.

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Politics
11:19 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Navy Yard Tragedy Unnerves Mass Shooting Survivors

A small group holds a candlelight vigil Monday on Washington's Freedom Plaza to remember the victims of the D.C. Navy Yard shooting.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 12:12 pm

They never quite get over it.

Whenever there's a mass shooting, a tragedy that occurs with depressing frequency, survivors of earlier events have their own memories brought back vividly and horribly.

Kristina Anderson, one of dozens of people who was shot at Virginia Tech in 2007, now works across the river from Washington, D.C. When the news of the Navy Yard shootings there broke on Monday, her day melted into tears.

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The Two-Way
11:10 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Greek PM Denounces Neo-Nazi Party After Musician's Murder

Police escort a neo-Nazi suspect in connection with the fatal stabbing of a 34-year-old hip-hop artist.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 12:41 pm

Greece's premier has vowed not to let a neo-Nazi party undermine democracy after the killing of a Greek hip-hop and rap singer by a right-wing extremist.

"This government is determined not to let the descendants of the Nazis poison our social life or commit crimes," Antonis Samaras said in a national television address.

An extremist with possible ties to the right-wing Golden Dawn party has admitted to stabbing to death musician Pavlos Fyssas, who goes by the stage name Killah P. The incident has sparked outrage among many Greeks.

The Associated Press writes:

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The Salt
11:10 am
Thu September 19, 2013

'Mountain Dew Mouth' Is Destroying Appalachia's Teeth, Critics Say

Appalachia has a distinct culture of sipping soda constantly throughout the day. "Here in West Virginia, you see people carrying around bottles of Mountain Dew all the time — even at a public health conference," says public health researcher Dana Singer.
Jin Lee Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 8:50 am

Obesity. Diabetes. By now, we've all heard of the health risks posed by drinking too much soda.

But over in Appalachia, the region that stretches roughly from southern New York state to Alabama, the fight against soda is targeting an altogether different concern: rotted teeth.

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Author Interviews
11:06 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Years After Historic Ruling, Execution Still A 'Random' Justice

Execution witness Don Reid stands in the death chamber of the Texas State Penitentiary on July 31, 1972, where he officially watched 189 men die in the heavy oak electric chair. The Supreme Court struck down capital punishment on June 29 of that year.
AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 12:44 pm

In the mid-1970s, Arkansas' electric chair was being used by the prison barber to cut hair, and the execution chamber in New Hampshire was being used to store vegetables. That's because in 1972, the U.S. Supreme Court shocked the nation by striking down Georgia's death penalty law, effectively ending executions in the United States. But the decision provoked a strong backlash among those who favored the death penalty, and within four years the high court reversed course and issued a set of rulings that would permit the resumption of executions.

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Parallels
10:32 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Youth Interrupted: Myanmar's Underage, Illiterate Workers

A child carries a basket of stones while unloading a quarry boat with adult workers at a port in Yangon, Myanmar, last year. The U.N. says more than a third of the country's children have jobs.
Alexander F. Yuan AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 3:07 pm

Little King can't read or write. Little King can't tell you the name of his country's president.

But he's sturdy enough to balance heavy, spine-bending bundles of cargo atop his skull. Strong enough to tug dinghies loaded with bananas across the Yangon River's mucky banks at low tide.

Down by the docks, where men work like mules, Little King can earn $3 per day. He is a breadwinner, the primary supporter of a woman he adores and her two children.

But that woman is his mother. Those children are his sisters. Little King is just a kid.

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All Tech Considered
10:07 am
Thu September 19, 2013

How To Spot And Outfake Bogus Twitter Followers

A hashtag in the digital age.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 12:15 pm

If you're on Twitter, you might want to think twice before bragging about all those followers you've been racking up. Some of the people who follow you might be fake — and there are now websites designed to expose them.

NPR's product manager for social media, Kate Myers, talks to Tell Me More's Michel Martin about how to spot fake accounts, why they might be following you and what you can do to stop them.


Interview Highlights

On tallying fake Twitter followers

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Parallels
9:35 am
Thu September 19, 2013

France Moves To Say 'Mais Non' To Honey Boo Boos

Proposed legislation in France would ban pageants for the under-16 set, such as this "Mini-Miss" elegance beauty contest for 10-to-12-year-olds, held in Bobigny, near Paris, a year ago.
Benoit Tessier Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 2:41 pm

The French government has taken a step toward saying non to beauty pageants for girls younger than 16. Earlier this week, the upper house of Parliament voted in favor of banning such contests as part of a larger bill on women's rights.

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Code Switch
9:19 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Duck Eggs And Lotus Seeds: Waxing Nostalgic About Mooncakes

Mooncake fillings are almost always sweet, and can be made with different nuts, seeds or beans.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 1:32 pm

The little plastic sample tray is empty, but the man behind the counter quickly replaces it with one full of a mooncake cut into teeny-tiny pieces. I grab a piece (OK, a couple) before the jostling crowd behind me can get to it. Samples are, after all, the only reason to visit Costco in the middle of a Sunday. There's a large display of square tins, each decorated with a painting of a Chinese man. I take one back to my mother and ask, "Can we get one?"

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Economy
9:03 am
Thu September 19, 2013

War On Poverty Still Worth Fighting?

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 12:15 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
9:02 am
Thu September 19, 2013

A Hospital Tells Police Where Fights Happen, And Crime Drops

An ambulance makes its way through revelers in Cardiff city center in Wales in 2010. New measures in the city have reduced injuries caused by violence.
Matt Cardy Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 12:25 pm

On Saturday night, the emergency room staff knows all too well what's coming — people showing up with a broken jaw, a knife wound or a bashed-in face, often after too many hours in a pub. Doctors at the emergency department in Cardiff, Wales, realized that many of the people who were injured in fights never reported it to the police. That realization led to a simple program that has radically reduced the toll of violence.

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