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The Salt
12:54 am
Sat October 12, 2013

Feminist Hulk Smash Shutdown, Rescue Women On Food Aid!

Courtesy Jessica Lawson

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 6:09 pm

The government shutdown is frustrating enough for furloughed workers, but for families dependent on federal food assistance, it's infuriating.

Enter the Feminist Hulk.

The Twitter monster is smashing the shutdown's threats to the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Food and Nutrition program, which provides food aid to pregnant women and mothers of young children deemed to be at risk of malnutrition. And she's urging her nearly 74,000 followers to help.

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Parallels
12:54 am
Sat October 12, 2013

What Did The Arab Spring Cost? One Estimate Says $800 Billion

Anti-government demonstrators crowd Cairo's Tahrir Square in February 2011. A report from HSBC says Egypt and other Arab Spring countries will lose a total of $800 billion by the end of next year because of the unrest.
Mohammed Abed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 8:41 am

The Arab Spring unleashed massive, region-wide political turmoil, unseated longtime strongmen and it's still playing out. But what did it all cost?

A lot, according to a new report from the bank HSBC:

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Shots - Health News
12:53 am
Sat October 12, 2013

More Evidence Against Vitamin D To Build Bones In Middle Age

If only it was as simple as popping a supplement and being set for life. But alas, no.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 8:51 am

It's not easy being a wonder vitamin these days. Just when it looks like you're the solution to every health problem, some doctors come along and burst your bubble. Now it's happening to vitamin D.

The supplement has been widely promoted to prevent osteoporosis and fight a host of other ills. But recent studies haven't found much benefit, for bones or for general health.

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Music Interviews
11:03 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Electronic Music's Godfather Isn't Done Innovating

Morton Subotnick performs at New York's La MaMa Experimental Theatre Club in 2004. The pioneering electronic composer recently created a mobile app for children.
Jack Vartoogian Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 5:05 am

Morton Subotnick could fairly be called electronic music's first hitmaker. His 1967 album Silver Apples of the Moon was an international sensation. Or, in his words, "It was like a bombshell."

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:18 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Prediction

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 8:42 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, what will be the new Nobel Prize awarded for? Brian Babylon.

BRIAN BABYLON: It's going to be a super duper peace prize given to each American for putting up with Congress' crap.

(LAUGHTER)

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Jessi Klein.

JESSI KLEIN, COMEDIAN: There will be a Nobel Prize for twerking.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And Luke Burbank.

LUKE BURBANK: The Nobel Prize for open letter to Miley Cyrus.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:18 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 8:42 am

All the news we couldn't fit anywhere else.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:18 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Limericks

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 8:42 am

Carl reads three news-related limericks...Not Feline Fine, Pawn Police, Treble Trickery.

It's All Politics
3:57 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Worst Since Nixon? Report Slams White House Leak Policy

President Obama arrives to make a statement to the press at the White House.
Charles Dharapak AP

The most open and transparent administration in history? That's not how some veteran members of the press see it.

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The Salt
3:38 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Shutdown Leaves Some Seniors Worried About Their Next Meal

Seniors around the country depend on weekly deliveries of nutritionally balanced food from the USDA's supplemental nutrition program.
tmarvin iStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 4:27 pm

You've no doubt heard of Senior Meals on Wheels preparing hot meals delivered to the elderly. But there's a different meal program that's been put on hold because of the partial government shutdown. It's the USDA's Commodity Supplemental Food Program.

In Michigan's western Kent County alone, more than 1,300 low-income seniors depend on the program. For them, it's a nutrition lifeline: They can't just go to a food pantry for similar assistance.

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The Two-Way
3:27 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Migrant Boats Capsize Off Italy And Near Egypt

An Italian student holds a paper boat reading "How many tombs without names in Lampedusa, No to Bossi Fini" in reference to the recent tragedy near Lampedusa island where at least hundreds of immigrants drowned and the Bossi-Fini anti-immigration law.
Filippo Monteforte AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 4:59 pm

Two separate incidents left dozens of migrants dead, when their boats capsized on Friday.

First, a boat capsized off the Coast of Egypt and 12 migrants died and 116 were rescued. Then, 27 migrants died and 221 were rescued after a boat capsized off the coast of Italy.

Of course, this comes about a week after a similar incident left 339 dead because of a capsized boat near Italy.

The BBC reports on the Egypt accident:

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Business
2:42 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

At Global Gathering, Many Worry About U.S. Strength

The annual meetings of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank began Thursday in Washington amid a partial government shutdown. Many delegates are concerned that the U.S. budget impasse may threaten global economic stability.
Jose Luis Magana AP

Originally published on Sat October 12, 2013 8:19 am

When you invite guests over, you probably straighten up the house to make a good impression.

This week, the nation's capital is welcoming guests from all over the world. Thousands of finance ministers, central bankers, scholars and industry leaders are in Washington, D.C., for the annual meetings of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank.

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Sports
2:42 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Electric Football, Invented In 1948, Still Alive And Buzzing

Electric football survived the advent of Madden video games and today has a cult following.
Chris Benderev NPR

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 7:52 pm

Professional football is America's real pastime.

The 2013 Super Bowl was the third-most-watched piece of television in recorded history. The first- and second-most-watched? The previous two Super Bowls.

And buried deep down inside that avalanche of fandom are the people who still play a board game invented in 1948 called electric football.

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NPR Story
2:38 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

'Glee' Tribute To Cory Monteith Is Silent On Specifics Of Character's Death

There was a scarcely a dry eye when the hit show “Glee” paid tribute last night to one of its stars, Cory Monteith, who portrayed football player-turned-singer Finn Hudson.

Monteith died of a drug overdose in July. He was 31.

There had been a lot of speculation about how the show would explain his character’s death, but the program made no mention of how Finn died.

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NPR Story
2:38 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Elizabeth Graver's Novel Longlisted for National Book Award

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 7:00 am

The finalists for the National Book Award for fiction will be announced next week.

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NPR Story
2:38 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

China's Growing Influence In Former Soviet Republics

With China’s rapid rise as a global economic power, it’s become increasingly fashionable to talk about reviving the Old Silk Road: the interlocking series of routes — dating back to pre-Christian times — along which merchants, pilgrims and soldiers travelled from East to West.

The latest person to talk romantically that period is Chinese President Xi Jinping, during his first visit of neighboring Central Asian states in September.

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Movie Interviews
2:33 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

'The Square' Tightens Lens On Egypt's Revolution

Ahmed Hassan is the leader of the group of young Egyptian revolutionaries at the center of The Square.
Noujaim Films

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 7:56 pm

The new documentary The Square — set in Cairo's Tahrir Square — is a gripping, visceral portrait of the 2011 Egyptian revolution and its tumultuous aftermath.

The film puts the audience directly in the middle of the protests, and follows the lives of several young revolutionaries over the two and half years since. It charts their journey from the early euphoria of victory to the depths of despair as those victories unravel amid violent clashes and profound political confrontations among the secular revolutionaries, the Muslim Brotherhood and the military.

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It's All Politics
2:26 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Shutdown Takes A Toll On GOP In Virginia Governor's Race

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 3:38 pm

With the government shutdown now in its 11th day, polls show that voters think Republicans bear the biggest share of the blame.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in Virginia — a state that's home to some 172,000 federal civilian workers and where federal spending is a big part of the economy. In the race to be Virginia's next governor, GOP candidate Ken Cuccinelli is falling in the polls.

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Code Switch
2:22 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

'Fetch Clay, Make Man': Ali, Fetchit And The 'Anchor Punch'

In 1965, Muhammad Ali and Lincoln Perry (Stepin Fetchit) teamed up in pursuit of a legendary boxing technique: the anchor punch.
Courtesy of New York Theatre Workshop

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 3:38 pm

---

Muhammad Ali's first title defense, a first-round TKO of Sonny Liston in 1965, propelled Ali to the status of icon. In Ali's training camp before the fight was an icon from an earlier era: Lincoln Perry. He was the first African-American movie star, who went by the stage name Stepin Fetchi. The relationship between the two men is the subject of an off-Broadway play called Fetch Clay, Make Man.

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What Comes Next? Conversations On The Afterlife
2:22 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Heaven Is Waiting; Hell Is A Different Question, Nun Says

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 3:38 pm

Perhaps it's no surprise that Mary Catherine Hilkert, a Catholic theologian, a professor at Notre Dame and a Dominican Sister of Peace, believes that people can find love, mercy and union with God after death. In her eyes, however, the concept of hell is far less definitive.

As part of All Things Considered's series on the concept of life after death, Hilkert spoke with host Robert Siegel about her perspectives on heaven and hell, why she thinks of banquets when she imagines the afterlife and why people hold such strong beliefs about what happens when life ends.

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The Two-Way
1:59 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Peter Higgs Learned About His Nobel From A Former Neighbor

British physicist Peter Higgs.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 3:07 pm

The notoriously shy Peter Higgs learned that he had been awarded the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday from a former neighbor.

In a press conference on Friday, the British theoretical physicist said he had tried to skip town on Tuesday, but instead ended up at a restaurant to have beer and soup. The Nobel Prize Committee in Stockholm tried to call Higgs shortly before they made the announcement, but Higgs does not have a cellphone.

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