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NPR Story
1:34 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

'Racial Isolation' A Growing Phenomenon

Realtor Tony Campos, right, Watsonville's first Latino elected official, chats with Brian Chavez, center, and Oscar Gomez at an affordable housing complex for farmworkers and their children in Watsonville, Calif., July 19, 2013. As the Golden State becomes less and less white, communities are becoming more segregated, not less. (Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP)

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 2:14 pm

In Watsonville, Calif., 82 percent of residents are either immigrants or descendants of immigrants, according to the Associated Press. It’s an example of what some are calling “racial isolation,” the phenomenon of a minority group living among others of the same race and language.

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NPR Story
1:34 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Cold Temperatures Grip Most Of US

People carry sleds at Montrose Beach Park in Chicago on Sunday, Jan. 5, 2014. (Nam Y. Huh/AP)

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 2:14 pm

The “polar vortex” has descended on much of the country. It’s so cold that schools are closed in Chicago and St. Louis. More than 400 flights have been canceled in Chicago, and the Chicago Sun-Times has renamed the city “Chiberia.”

It’s 32 degrees below zero in Fargo, North Dakota, and in Indianapolis, it’s illegal for anyone to drive, except for emergencies or to seek shelter.

Here & Now’s Robin Young checks in with longtime reporter Dan Verbeck at KCUR in Kansas City, Missouri.

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NPR Story
1:34 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Supreme Court Puts Utah Same-Sex Marriage On Hold

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 2:14 pm

The Supreme Court has put same-sex marriages on hold in Utah while a federal appeals court considers the issue. The court has issued a brief order blocking any new same-sex unions in the state.

More than 900 gay and lesbian couples have married since Dec. 20, when a federal judge ruled that Utah’s ban on same-sex marriage violates gay and lesbian couples’ constitutional rights.

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The Two-Way
1:32 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Don't Just Shiver, Here Are 3 Cold-Weather Experiments To Try

A bubble freezes in very cold weather.
SimonSaysBaka via YouTube

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 3:37 pm

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Africa
1:27 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

How I Almost Got Arrested With A South Sudanese Ex-Minister

South Sudan's then-Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology Peter Adwok Nyaba (center) celebrates the first anniversary of the country's independence in Nairobi, capital of Kenya, on July 9, 2012. Since then, all of South Sudan's Cabinet ministers have been sacked — including Adwok — for allegedly conspiring to overthrow President Salva Kiir.
Ding Haitao Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Mon January 13, 2014 11:28 am

The unmarked, unpaved streets of Juba, the capital of South Sudan, can be tough for an outsider to navigate.

By the time I found the house of Peter Adwok Nyaba, the country's former minister of higher education, science and technology, it was already 5 p.m. The sun was dangerously low on the horizon. I had less than an hour to interview Adwok and get back to my hotel before the citywide curfew — imposed when the violence began three weeks before — took effect. After 6, there would be no one on the streets except myself and soldiers.

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Parallels
1:27 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Portugal's Baby Bust Is A Stark Sign Of Hard Times

Nurse Carina Araujo gives care to a child in the neonatal intensive care unit at Maternidade Doutor Alfredo da Costa Hospital in Lisbon, Portugal, on June 6. Portugal's birthrate has dropped 14 percent since the economic crisis hit.
The Washington Post The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 2:11 pm

In Lisbon, the waiting area of Portugal's biggest maternity hospital is empty. You can hear the hum of soda machines across the hall. There's just one expectant father, pacing the room.

Mario Carvalho, 40, has a toddler son and now awaits the birth of his baby girl.

"Today, I hope!" he says with a nervous smile.

The birth of a new baby is a joyous occasion. But in Portugal, it's an increasingly rare one. Since the economic crisis hit, the country's birthrate has dropped 14 percent, to less than 1.3 babies per woman — one of the lowest in the world.

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Environment
1:27 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Arctic Methane Bubbles Not As Foreboding As Once Feared

European scientists were alarmed in 2008 when they discovered streams of methane bubbles erupting from the seafloor in Norway's high Arctic. This gas, which contributes to global warming, was apparently coming from methane ice on the seafloor. A follow-up study finds that methane bubble plumes at this location have probably been forming for a few thousand years, so they are not the result of human-induced climate change. But continued warming of ocean water can trigger more methane releases in the Arctic, with potentially serious consequences to the climate.

Around the Nation
1:27 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Forest Service May Try To Recoup Rim Fire Costs With Logging

The U.S. Forest Service has proposed a large salvage logging operation in the area affected by last year's historic Rim Fire, which burned 410-square miles of California's Sierra Nevada. The proposal is meeting stiff opposition from environmental groups who say the land is better left untouched.

The Salt
12:54 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The Ignatius R

No mouths were harmed in the eating of this sandwich. Except Eva's — she wants Worker's Comp for a bad case of Sandwich Jaw.
NPR

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 11:01 am

It's -16 degrees today here in Chicago, which for many of us has triggered hibernation mode. Fortunately the great Jerry's Sandwiches has created the Ignatius R., with enough calories to get us to the end of winter, which we expect to occur sometime in August.

The ingredient list: fried chicken, cold hickory-smoked sirloin, applewood bacon, fresh mozzarella, lettuce, Carolina vinegar, fried shrimp, fried green tomato, mortadella, country ham, pickled okra, American cheese, lettuce, tomato, and Southwest mayo on a potato bun.

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The Salt
12:22 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Looks Like The Paleo Diet Wasn't Always So Hot For Ancient Teeth

Say aaaaaah! Dental caries and other signs of oral disease are plain to see in the upper teeth of this hunter-gatherer, between 14,000 and 15,000 years old. The findings challenge the idea that the original paleo diet was inherently healthy, says paleo-anthropologist Louise Humphrey. It all depended, she says, on what wild foods were available.
Courtesy of Isabelle De Groote

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 3:16 pm

One of the hinge points in human history was the invention of agriculture. It led to large communities, monumental architecture and complex societies. It also led to tooth decay.

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Shots - Health News
12:08 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Frostbite Tips For Novices: Skip Whiskey And Shed Your Rings

Jenny Hackett walks across a street in St. Louis, Mo., on Sunday. Subzero temperatures are predicted there Monday, with bitter cold sweeping east.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Tue January 7, 2014 5:38 am

Frostbite isn't usually a major worry here in Washington, D.C., but with wind chills below zero forecast for half of the Lower 48 by Tuesday morning, millions of people from the Plains to the East Coast will have to start thinking like Arctic explorers while waiting for a school bus or heading to work.

Noses, fingers, toes and ears face the biggest risk. Those body parts have less blood flowing through them and a lot less mass than the body's core. They're also more likely to be exposed to the elements. Obviously, bundling up those tender parts is key.

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Television
11:05 am
Mon January 6, 2014

'Downton' Returns, And It's As Rich As Ever

Michelle Dockery's Lady Mary is in deep mourning as Downton Abbey returns for a fourth season on PBS.
Nick Briggs Carnival Film & Television Limited

Originally published on Tue January 7, 2014 4:36 am

When you think about what Downton Abbey has achieved, and is continuing to pull off, it's actually pretty remarkable. In an era when the most acclaimed TV series of the decade is an edgy cable drama about a dying, meth-making criminal, Downton Abbey draws similarly large audiences on broadcast TV — public TV, at that — with an old-fashioned soap opera about servants and household staffers and those they serve. As Season 4 begins on PBS, Downton Abbey is the most popular drama in the history of public television.

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Author Interviews
11:05 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Fear Of Fainting, Flight And Cheese: One Man's 'Age Of Anxiety'

Yuri Arcurs iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 5:09 pm

Atlantic magazine editor Scott Stossel has countless phobias and anxieties — some you've heard of, others you probably haven't.

"There's a vast encyclopedia of fears and phobias," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "and pretty much any object, experience, situation you can think of, there is someone who has a phobia of it."

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The Two-Way
11:01 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Deadly Violence Mars Elections In Bangladesh

Bangladeshi protesters burn election material Sunday at a polling station in the northern town of Bogra.
AFP/Getty Images

Bangladesh's parliamentary election Sunday proved to be among the most violent vote in the country's short history. At least 18 people were killed, including an election officer who was beaten to death, and scores of polling stations firebombed, according to local media reports.

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The Two-Way
10:55 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Last Game Is Finally Here: BCS May Go Out With A Bang

Look, But Don't Touch, Part I: Some players are superstitious and don't want to touch a trophy until they win it. Florida State defensive back Jonathan Akanbi poses with the NCAA's Coaches' Trophy, which goes to the winner of Monday night's game.
Chris Carlson AP

There are obviously many things that could be said about Monday night's Bowl Championship Series game between No. 1 Florida State and No. 2 Auburn, starting with this:

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The Two-Way
10:25 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Ending 20-Year Era, Boston Welcomes A New Mayor

Mayor-elect of Boston, Marty Walsh (right), takes the oath of office Monday in Conte Forum at Boston College.
Michael Dwyer AP

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 10:49 am

A two-decade era came to an end Monday in Boston.

Thomas Menino, 71, left a job he had held since 1993. And Marty Walsh was sworn in as the city's new mayor.

Walsh and his early appointments, NPR member station WBUR reports, signal the "the emergence of a new Boston — younger and more diverse — in city politics."

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Around the Nation
9:42 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Stories To Watch In 2014

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
9:18 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Dennis Rodman: North Korea Is 'Not That Bad'

Former NBA basketball player Dennis Rodman waits to check in for his flight to North Korea after his arrival at Beijing's international airport on Monday.
Wang Zhao AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 9:46 am

As he headed to North Korea for what he calls "basketball diplomacy," former NBA star Dennis Rodman wants you to know that what human rights groups consider one of the most repressive countries in the world is "not that bad."

Rodman gave an interview to The Associated Press before he took off for North Korea from China with a few former NBA players.

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The Two-Way
9:13 am
Mon January 6, 2014

'Jihad Jane' Gets 10 Years In Prison

Colleen LaRose, a.k.a. Jihad Jane.
AP

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 2:56 pm

The Pennsylvania woman known as "Jihad Jane" has been sentenced to 10 years in prison for her role in a failed al-Qaida plot to kill a Swedish artist.

Reuters writes that "Colleen R. LaRose, 50, could have received a life sentence [but] has given authorities significant help in other terrorism cases since her 2009 arrest, prosecutors said."

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The Two-Way
8:45 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Story That Kim Jong Un Fed Uncle To Dogs Was Probably Satire

People watch a TV news program showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, right, and Kim's uncle, Jang Song Thaek, circled in red, at the Seoul Railway Station in South Korea on Dec. 3.
Ahn Young-joon AP
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