NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
3:26 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Senate Confirms James Comey As Next FBI Director

Former Deputy Attorney General James B. Comey waits to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee in Washington on May 15, 2007. NPR has learned that Comey is in line to become President Obama's choice as the next FBI director.
Susan Walsh AP

With a vote of 93-1, the Senate confirmed James Comey as the next director of the FBI. Comey will replace Robert Mueller.

NPR's Carrie Johnson filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Comey is a Republican and a former Justice Department official during the George W. Bush years. Civil rights groups questioned his record on surveillance and harsh interrogation of terrorism suspects.

"But after Kentucky Republican Rand Paul lifted his hold on the FBI nominee, Comey sailed through the full Senate.

Read more
Code Switch
3:10 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

In Nation's First Black Public High School, A Blueprint For Reform

Dunbar High School has a notable list of graduates, including the first black presidential Cabinet member, the first black general in the Army and several of the lawyers who argued the Brown v. Board of Education decision.
Courtesy of Chicago Review Press

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 11:26 am

The nation's first black public high school, Paul Laurence Dunbar High, opened its doors in Washington, D.C., in 1870. But more than 140 years later, Dunbar — like many urban schools — has fallen on hard times. The crumbling, brutalist-style building is often described as a prison, and graduation rates hover around 60 percent.

But it wasn't always that way. Once upon a time, the yearbook read like a Who's Who of black America.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:09 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Panel Urges Lung Cancer Screening For Millions Of Americans

Some images of lung cancer are clear cut. But in many others, a nodule on the screen turns out not to be cancer at all.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 11:24 am

A federal task force is planning to recommend that millions of smokers and former smokers get a CT scan annually to look for early signs of lung cancer.

The 16-member US Preventive Services Task Force gives that lung cancer screening test a grade of B, which puts it on the same level as mammography for women between the ages of 50 and 74.

Read more
All Tech Considered
3:09 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

What We're Watching As World's Big Hackers Meet In Las Vegas

Hackers attend the 2011 Def Con conference in Las Vegas. The 2013 conference as well as the Black Hat hacker conference kicks off this week.
Isaac Brekken AP

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:01 pm

Read more
The Two-Way
2:51 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Police Arrest Woman Suspected Of Vandalizing Washington Icon

Green paint was discovered in two chapels inside the National Cathedral in Washington on Monday.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 4:07 pm

Police in Washington, D.C., say a woman has been arrested, suspected of splattering green paint across the organ at the National Cathedral, the Episcopalian church that has long served as the country's spiritual home.

CNN's Dan Merica tweeted this photo of church:

NPR member station WAMU reports the arrest follows a series of similar acts of vandalism across Washington.

Read more
It's All Politics
2:45 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Obama And Clinton Meet For 'Friendship' Lunch

President Obama has lunch with former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on the patio outside the Oval Office on Monday.
Chuck Kennedy The White House

Talk about a power lunch.

President Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton met Monday for a private lunch that immediately sparked speculation about what it means for the 2016 presidential race.

The visit marked at least the second time the two have met privately since Clinton left the State Department earlier this year. Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, met with Obama and first lady Michelle Obama for a private White House dinner in March.

Read more
U.S.
2:08 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Statue Brings Friction Over WWII Comfort Women To California

South Korean police stand guard beside a comfort woman statue in front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul in May. The Southern California city of Glendale will dedicate an identical statue on Tuesday.
Chung Sung-Jun Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:01 pm

For decades, Koreans have been pushing to preserve the legacy of women forced to provide sex to Japanese army soldiers during World War II. Glendale, Calif., will dedicate a statue memorializing the victims, known as "comfort women," on Tuesday. But the statue has spurred controversy in this Southern California city, where some area residents say it is a divisive reminder of the horrors of war.

The sculpture is a bronze statue of a young girl. She looks about 14 — around the same age as many comfort women when they were forced into military brothels run by Japan's imperial army.

Read more
Law
2:08 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Legal Battles Over Land Rights, Pipelines Are On The Rise

The Crosstex NGL Pipeline is just one such project in the country that has forced long, unwanted legal battles between oil companies and landowners.
Mose Buchele KUT

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:01 pm

At Margaret O'Keefe's farm in East Texas, they grow high-quality Bermuda grass. The fields are flat and vibrant green, surrounded by woods of a darker, richer green. The family loves this land. O'Keefe inherited it from her mother, who divided it among eight children.

"She used to call it 'enchanted valley,' " O'Keefe says.

But her "enchanted valley" also lies in the path of the Crosstex NGL Pipeline.

Read more
All Tech Considered
2:08 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Tiny Tech Puts Satellites In Hands Of Homebrew Designers

Joyce Yu-Jean Lee, 33, concentrates on a yellow blinking light during a microprocessor workshop with HacDC.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 6:01 pm

Two satellites set for launch Sunday will soon be in the hands of ordinary people because they run on a tiny microchip that anyone can program.

Read more
Environment
2:08 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Once Resilient, Trees In The West Now More Vulnerable To Fires

The remains of a tree are seen in front of a boulder in the Dome Wilderness area of New Mexico in August 2012. The Las Conchas Fire torched the land in 2011, burning through more than 150,000 acres of forest.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 11:24 am

On any given day, there's a wildfire burning somewhere in the U.S. — and that's not necessarily a bad thing. Many western forests have evolved with fire, and actually benefit from the occasional wildfire.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:05 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Head-On Train Collision In Switzerland Leaves Dozens Injured

Two passenger trains were involved in a head-on collision in Switzerland on Monday.

Read more
Middle East
1:56 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Egyptian Crisis Slows Flow Through Gaza's Smuggling Tunnels

Workers in the Gaza Strip load a truck with sacks of cement that arrived via a smuggling tunnel from Egypt. Gazan officials say the Egyptian military has cracked down on smuggling tunnels that bring many goods into Gaza.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 11:24 am

At the very southern end of the Gaza Strip on Monday morning, sweaty men in bare feet carried bags of cement on their backs from a stack near a gaping hole in the ground to a waiting truck.

The cement had come through a tunnel from Egypt, a lucky load that made it.

Over the past several weeks, Egypt's military has cracked down on the smuggling tunnels that bring many goods into Gaza.

Read more
Shots - Health News
1:19 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Canvassers For Health Coverage Find Few Takers In Boca Raton

Volunteer Tammy Spencer goes door to door in Boca Raton., Fla., on July 27 to spread the word on the state's health exchange.
Phil Galewitz Kaiser Health News

Tammy Spencer did a double take when she read the address on her paper and looked at the house in front of her.

Spencer, a volunteer with the nonprofit Enroll America, was spending a hot and humid Saturday morning knocking on doors in Boca Raton, a mostly posh South Florida city, looking for people without health coverage. She wanted to let them know about new online insurance marketplaces that open for enrollment Oct. 1.

Read more
NPR Story
12:30 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

The Woman Behind 'Orange Is The New Black'

Promotional image from the new Netflix series "Orange Is The New Black." (Netflix)

Netflix’s new original series “Orange Is the New Black” is based on the life of Piper Kerman, a Smith graduate and self-described WASP who must go to prison for 13 months when her past catches up with her.

Read more
NPR Story
12:26 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Jewelry Heist In Cannes Is Third In 3 Months

A view of the Carlton hotel, in Cannes, southern France, the scene of a daylight raid, Sunday, July 28, 2013. (Lionel Cironneau/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 1:10 pm

A lone man wearing gloves, a cap, and a scarf to mask his face sneaked into a diamond show in a luxury Cannes hotel and made off with some $136 million of loot, a French state prosecutor said Monday – more than twice the initial estimated take from the weekend hold-up.

Read more
NPR Story
12:26 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Home Construction Roars Back in Colorado

A home under construction by New Town Builders in Denver's Stapleton neighborhood. The company is building 78 homes, and all but one have already sold. (Ben Markus/Colorado Public Radio)

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 1:10 pm

After years of lackluster growth, single-family home construction is finally making a comeback in many parts of the country.

One of the states leading the way is Colorado.

Permits to build homes there are at their highest level in six years, according to numbers released by the U.S. Census Department last week.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Ben Marcus of Colorado Public Radio reports on what’s driving the increase.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:00 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Military Judge Will Likely Announce Manning Verdict Tuesday

Supporters of U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning protest his detention by marching around the perimeter and blocking the gates of Fort McNair in Washington, D.C., on the final day of closing arguments in his military trial Friday.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 4:06 pm

The military judge presiding over the case of Bradley Manning will likely hand down her verdict on Tuesday.

Manning is accused of perpetrating the biggest leak of classified information in the history of the United States. Col. Denise Lind has been deliberating since Friday. The Guardian reports:

Read more
The Two-Way
11:58 am
Mon July 29, 2013

No Safe Places In Syria: Photographer Abducted At Media Center

Syrians search for survivors under the rubble of a destroyed house after a barrel bomb was dropped from an air force helicopter in Saraqeb on July 20.
Daniel Leal-Olivas AFP/Getty Images

We're catching up with a harrowing story out of Syria about a Polish photographer who was kidnapped last week and is possibly being held for ransom. NPR's Rima Marrouch sent this report.

Photographer Marcin Suder was staying at a media center in the rebel-held town of Saraqeb in Idlib province when a group of masked men reportedly stormed in Wednesday morning. They beat a Syrian media activist, stole equipment and abducted Suder.

Read more
NPR Story
11:36 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Gay Priest Calls Pope's Comments 'Step In Right Direction'

Pope Francis speaks during a news conference aboard the papal flight on its way back from Brazil, Monday, July 29, 2013. (Luca Zennaro/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 1:10 pm

Pope Francis spoke with reporters this morning in an extraordinary, impromptu press conference on board his plane on the way back to Italy from Brazil.

The National Catholic Reporter’s John Allen Jr. writes that the 76-year-old Pope stood the whole time and never refused a question, even thanking a reporter who asked about charges of homosexual conduct against his appointee to reform the Vatican bank.

Read more
Shots - Health News
11:32 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Boys With Autism Or ADHD More Prone To Overuse Video Games

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children have no more than two hours a day of "screen time."
Marilyn Nieves iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 2:50 pm

Video games can be a haven from the world, and it's easy to imagine that they would appeal to children who struggle with social interaction.

Boys with autism spectrum disorders or with ADHD are both prone to problematic use of video games, according to a study.

The researchers asked the parents of boys ages 8 to 18 to report on their child's video game use, including hours of use and the types of games they play.

Read more

Pages