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Health
3:18 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

'Man With The Golden Arm' Donates Blood That Has Saved 2 Million Babies

James Harrison was recognized in 2003 with the Guinness World Record for the most blood donated by one person.
DAVID GRAY Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 8:20 am

When James Harrison was 14, he got really sick. One of his lungs had to be removed, and he needed a lot of blood.

"I was in the hospital for three months and I had 100 stitches," he recalls.

After receiving 13 units — almost 2 gallons — of donated blood, Harrison knew right away that he wanted to give back.

"I was always looking forward to donating, right from the operation, because I don't know how many people it took to save my life," he says. "I never met them, didn't know them."

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Europe
2:30 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

With Tensions Rising, Poland Erects Observation Towers On Russian Border

Unmanned observation towers, funded by the European Union, have sprouted recently along Poland's border with Russia. This one is located outside the sleepy Polish border village of Parkoszewo.
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson NPR

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 7:57 am

Like most former Soviet satellites, Poland has grown very suspicious of Russian intentions since the Kremlin annexed Crimea last year. Poles living near the 180-mile border their country shares with Russia became especially wary after their government, among others, accused Moscow of deploying nuclear-capable Iskander missiles in Kaliningrad.

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Goats and Soda
2:14 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

Why MERS Is Likely To Crop Up Outside The Middle East Again

A dangerous nuzzle? A man in western Abu Dhabi hugs a camel brought in from Saudi Arabia for beauty contests. Middle East respiratory syndrome circulates in camels across the Arabian Peninsula.
Dave Yoder National Geographic

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 11:09 am

Blame it on the camels.

When scientists first detected Middle East respiratory syndrome in 2012, the big question was: Where is this virus coming from?

For several years, scientists hunted the deadly virus across the Arabian Peninsula, and eventually they found at least one source — dromedary camels.

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My Big Break
2:13 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

Bankrolling A Dinosaur Dig And Unearthing A Giant: The Giganotosaurus

The skull of a Giganotosaurus.
Courtesy Don Lessem

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 1:18 pm

As part of a series called My Big Break, All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

This weekend, the dinosaurs are back in Jurassic World, where the park is ravaged by the invented Indominus Rex.

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Space
2:13 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

'Hello Earth! Can You Hear Me?'

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 2:31 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Middle East
2:13 pm
Sun June 14, 2015

Yemen Peace Talks To Begin Monday

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 7:41 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Two-Way
10:30 am
Sun June 14, 2015

John S. Carroll, Former Editor At 'LA Times,' 'Baltimore Sun,' Dies At 73

John Carroll, then executive vice president and editor of The Los Angeles Times, speaking at a panel discussion with fellow editors in 2003. Carroll died Sunday at age 73.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 7:40 am

Updated Monday at 5:45 a.m. ET.

John S. Carroll, a former editor of The Baltimore Sun and The Los Angeles Times, which he led to 13 Pulitzer Prizes in his short tenure — has died at age 73.

The LA Times described Carroll as "a courageous editor [who had an] instinct for the big story and unrelenting focus." The newspaper reported he died Sunday in Lexington, Ky., of Creutzfeldt-Jakob, a degenerative brain disease.

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The Two-Way
8:18 am
Sun June 14, 2015

Comet Lander Wakes Up, Calls Home, After Long Sleep

The Philae lander beamed back images showing one of its three feet on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. This photo is compiled from two images.
ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CIVA

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 2:44 am

Last November, the European Space Agency wasn't sure if it would ever hear from its Philae lander again after the probe's unfortunate landing spot on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko left it in the shadow of a cliff, starving its solar panels of the faint sunlight needed to produce power.

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Parallels
8:02 am
Sun June 14, 2015

Brazilians Take A Swing At Mosquitoes With The Zap Racket

Pots with genetically modified male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are pictured before they are released in Piracicaba, Brazil in April.
Paulo Whitaker Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 12:03 pm

It's summer right now and I'm sure you've noticed them: small, insidious buzzing — mosquitoes. In Brazil, they are potentially deadly. It's the place where the mosquito-born virus dengue fever is most prevalent.

Enter the Zapping Racket. As the name implies, it is an electrified tennis racket that kills mosquitoes.

I know, right? Genius.

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The Two-Way
6:46 am
Sun June 14, 2015

Hong Kong Protesters Renew Push For Electoral Reform

Supporters of free and open elections in Hong Kong march through the city streets ahead of a crucial vote on political reform in the city's Legislative Council.
Alex Hoffard EPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 3:20 am

Thousands of protesters took to the streets of Hong Kong to resume protests against Beijing's hand-picked pool of candidates for the territory's next chief executive – urging lawmakers to approve a reform that would instead allow direct elections.

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Goats and Soda
6:40 am
Sun June 14, 2015

Science Fair Winner Designs Device To Cut Virus Spread On Planes

Raymond Wang, 17, of Vancouver, celebrates winning first place at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Pittsburgh, May 15.
Courtesy of Kathy Wolfe/Intel

When 17-year-old Raymond Wang saw the Ebola outbreak on the news last year, it got him thinking about viruses and how they spread around the world, especially on airplanes.

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Parallels
6:28 am
Sun June 14, 2015

For Yemen's Ousted President, A Five-Star Exile With No End In Sight

Houthi supporters in Yemen's capital hold up at a defaced poster of the ousted president, Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi, during a demonstration against air strikes by Saudi Arabia. The Saudis, who have been bombing Yemen since March, are hosting Hadi and other officials from the former government.
Khaled Abdullah Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 2:23 pm

When Houthi rebels stormed Yemen's capital in January, President Abed-Rabbo Mansour Hadi was driven from power and placed under house arrest. He escaped and then fled by sea in March. Now, Hadi and his top ministers are comfortably ensconced in a five-star guest palace in Saudi Arabia's capital of Riyadh.

While the surrounding may be pleasant, the wait is wearing. Hadi and his aides still dream of a triumphant return home, though optimism is in short supply.

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The Two-Way
5:51 am
Sun June 14, 2015

South African Court Orders Sudan's President Detained For War Crimes

Sudan's President Omar Hassan al-Bashir speaks to the crowd after a swearing-in ceremony at green square in Khartoum, earlier this month. A South African court has ordered al-Bashir, who is attending an African Union summit in Johannesburg, to be detained on an international war crimes warrant.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 3:34 am

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

A South African judge has issued an interim order to prevent visiting Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir from leaving the country due to an international warrant for his arrest on charges of human rights violations.

The International Criminal Court has called on South Africa to arrest al-Bashir for war crimes and crimes against humanity over atrocities allegedly committed in the conflict in Darfur.

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Parallels
5:09 am
Sun June 14, 2015

Israel Bringing Its Years Of Desalination Experience To California

The Hadera desalination plant is one of five built in Israel after a severe drought in the 1990s. Along with conservation efforts and water recycling, the plants have helped end Israel's chronic water shortages.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 2:24 pm

Taking the salt out of seawater helped Israel move from the constant threat of drought to a plentiful supply of water, but Israel has learned that desalination is not the only answer.

Ben-Gurion University's Institute for Water Research is deep in Israel's Negev desert and away from the sea. Prof. Jack Gilron, head of the Department of Desalination and Water Treatment, and other researchers here test concepts in desalination to see if they might hold promise for industrial development.

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The Two-Way
4:52 am
Sun June 14, 2015

10 Dead, Zoo Animals Loose As Flooding Hits Tbilisi

A man shoots a tranquilizer dart to put a hippopotamus to sleep at a flooded street in Tbilisi, Georgia, on Sunday. At least eight people died and several are missing as a result of heavy rainfall and floods overnight in the Georgian capital.
Beso Gulashvili Reuters/Landov

At least 10 people are dead in flooding that has surged through Tbilisi, the Georgian capital, and residents are being warned to stay indoors to avoid zoo animals set free by the rising water. Tigers, lions, bears, wolves and a hippo escaped their enclosures.

The Associated Press says an escaped hippo was cornered in one of the city's main squares and subdued with a tranquilizer gun, but the news agency said it was unclear how many animals were loose.

The AP says:

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NPR Ed
4:48 am
Sun June 14, 2015

Hot Jazz, Cool Teacher: How One New Orleans Man Fosters Greatness

Sam Venable teaches music at Langston Hughes Elementary in New Orleans.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 8:30 am

Peanut butter and jelly. Abbott and Costello. New Orleans and marching bands.

Some things are inseparable.

The city best known for hot jazz is a wellspring of talented musicians. Where do they all come from? Oftentimes it's great teachers — like Sam Venable, the band director at Langston Hughes Academy, a middle school on Trafalgar Street.

Hear the story of great teaching at the top of the page. You can also hear this clip of Venable playing at his grandmother's 90th birthday:

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National Security
4:48 am
Sun June 14, 2015

U.S. May Send Tanks And Infantry Vehicles To Eastern Europe

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 8:02 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
4:48 am
Sun June 14, 2015

Clinton Picks A Park With No Ceiling, Glass Or Otherwise, For Launch

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 3:08 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Science
4:48 am
Sun June 14, 2015

Female Scientists Unleash Comedic Revenge At #Distractinglysexy

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 8:02 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Asia
4:48 am
Sun June 14, 2015

Brutal Attacks On Nuns Put India's Christians On Edge

Originally published on Sun June 14, 2015 8:02 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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