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The Two-Way
11:38 am
Fri May 22, 2015

ISIS Affiliate Claims Responsibility For Suicide Attack In Saudi Arabia

People examine the debris following a suicide bomb attack Friday at the Imam Ali mosque in the eastern village of al Qudaih in Saudi Arabia's Qatif province. A branch of the self-declared Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the attack.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 12:57 pm

A branch of the self-declared Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the suicide bombing of a Shiite mosque in eastern Saudi Arabia that has killed at least 19 people, a move that could represent a significant escalation of the extremist group's operations in the kingdom.

NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo that the online statement from ISIS "named and praised the Saudi suicide bomber who detonated himself amongst a congregation of Shiite Saudis praying in a mosque in the village of al Qudaih in Qatif province."

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Code Switch
11:28 am
Fri May 22, 2015

2 Biker Rallies: One White, One Black — One 'Badass,' The Other, Just 'Bad'

A biker leaves a biker bar in Murrells Inlet, S.C., in May 2012 after competing in a slow ride competition inside the bar. It was one of the events held during the annual Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Spring Rally in and around Myrtle Beach.
Randall Hill Reuters/Landov

In his column this week, Charles Blow of The New York Times broke down the difference between "bikers" and "thugs" in the wake of the deadly biker gang shootout in Waco, Texas:

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The Two-Way
10:48 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Who Let The Dogs In? We Did, About 30,000 Years Ago

Josh Brones walks his hunting dogs, Dollar (from left), Sequoia and Tanner, near his home in Wilton, Calif., in 2012.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 4:36 pm

It looks like dogs might well have been man's (and woman's) best friend for a lot longer than once thought.

The long-held conventional wisdom is that canis lupus familiaris split from wolves 11,000 to 16,000 years ago and that the divergence was helped along by Stone Age humans who wanted a fellow hunter, a sentry and a companion.

Now, DNA evidence suggests that the split between dogs and their wild ancestors occurred closer to 30,000 years ago.

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The Two-Way
9:51 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Some Clinton Emails Were Retroactively Classified

The State Department is releasing 296 emails from Hillary Clinton's email account during her tenure as secretary of state. The correspondence relates to the attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 2:12 pm

Updated at 3:40 p.m. ET

Emails released Friday by the State Department appear to confirm Hillary Clinton's assertion that she received no classified information on her personal email account while she served as secretary of state. Still, some of the emails were classified at the FBI's request after the fact — something the White House says is not uncommon.

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Goats and Soda
9:03 am
Fri May 22, 2015

A Desk That Can Take A Ton Of Earthquake Rubble

Still standing: The earthquake-proof desk can withstand 2,200 pounds dropped on top of it.
Courtesy of Ido Bruno

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 12:02 pm

Call it the little school desk that can.

At 57 pounds, the desk in question is light enough for two students to carry and move around the classroom. At $35 per student, it's affordable enough for many school districts to buy in bulk. And oh yes, tests have shown it can survive a crushing weight of 1,000 kilograms (2,200 pounds) or more.

In other words, this desk can withstand an earthquake — and potentially save students' lives in the process

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Shots - Health News
8:20 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Your Roommate In The Nursing Home Might Be A Bedbug

Hospitals seem to be doing a better job than nursing homes of keeping bedbugs at bay.
iStockphoto

If you're in the hospital or a nursing home, the last thing you want to be dealing with is bedbugs. But exterminators saying they're getting more and more calls for bedbug infestations in nursing homes, hospitals and doctor's offices.

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Shots - Health News
7:46 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Covered California Votes To Cap What Patients Pay For Pricey Drugs

Retired California school teacher Mikkel Lawrence sits with his cat, Max. Lawrence has hepatitis C and has struggled to afford the medicine he needs to treat it.
April Dembosky KQED

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 9:01 am

In recent years, expensive specialty medicines used to treat cancer and chronic illnesses have forced some very ill Americans to choose between getting proper treatment and paying their rent.

To ease the financial burden, the California agency that governs the state's Obamacare plans issued landmark rules Thursday that will put a lid on the amount anyone enrolled in one of those plans can be charged each month for high-end medicine.

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Parallels
6:33 am
Fri May 22, 2015

A Wedding And A Challenge: Lebanese Couples Fight For Civil Marriage

Kholoud Succariyeh (right) and Nidal Darwish, who got married in defiance of Lebanon's ban on civil unions, walk past Beirut's landmark Pigeon Rock in 2013.
Joseph Eid AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 23, 2015 8:52 am

Like lots of young married couples, Kholoud Succariyeh and Nidal Darwish love to show their wedding video. They go all misty-eyed remembering that day two years ago.

"Very beautiful," says Succariyeh. "Everything is nice."

Their wedding was special, not only as a personal milestone for the couple. It was a political milestone, as well.

Darwish says their union was a challenge to the state: It was Lebanon's first civil marriage.

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The Two-Way
6:04 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Pipeline Operator: Possibly Months To Determine Cause Of Calif. Spill

A bird covered in oil flaps its wings at Refugio State Beach, north of Goleta, Calif., on Thursday. More than 9,000 gallons of oil have been raked, skimmed and vacuumed from a spill that stretched across 9 miles of California coast, just a fraction of the sticky, stinking goo that escaped from a broken pipeline, officials said.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 3:35 pm

It could be months before investigators can determine what caused a pipeline leak that has fouled a stretch of coast in Southern California, the company that operates the oil conduit says.

Since the leak was discovered earlier this week, more than 9,000 gallons of oil have been raked, skimmed or vacuumed from a 9-mile stretch of California shoreline near Santa Barbara, officials say.

"We have not even uncovered the pipe yet," said Patrick Hodgins, senior director of safety for Texas-based Plains All American, according to The Associated Press.

The AP reports:

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TED Radio Hour
6:02 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Is Aging Really So Bad?

"I don't have to prove anything anymore. I'm not stuck in the idea of who I was, who I want to be, or what other people expect me to be." - Author Isabel Allende
James Duncan Davidson Courtesy of TED

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Fountain Of Youth

About Isabel Allende's TED Talk

Author Isabel Allende is in her 70's. She's got a few wrinkles—but she has incredible perspective, too. She says she plans to keep on living passionately as long as she can.

About Isabel Allende

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TED Radio Hour
5:26 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Can Aging Be Cured?

"Things that only have a 50% chance of happening 20 years from now are supposed to sound like science fiction." - Aubrey de Grey
Robert Leslie TED

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 6:01 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Fountain Of Youth

About Aubrey de Grey's TED Talk

Cambridge researcher Aubrey de Grey argues that aging is merely a disease — and a curable one at that.

About Aubrey de Grey

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TED Radio Hour
5:26 am
Fri May 22, 2015

How Do You Make An Elderly Worm Feel Young Again?

"We can harness our bodies' own abilities that are kind of kept under wraps to allow the aging process to be slowed down." - Biochemist Cynthia Kenyon
James Duncan Davidson Courtesy of TED

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 6:01 am

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Fountain Of Youth

About Cynthia Kenyon's TED Talk

What controls aging? Biochemist Cynthia Kenyon has found a genetic mutation that can more than double the lifespan of a tiny worm, which points to how we might one day significantly extend human life.

About Cynthia Kenyon

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TED Radio Hour
5:26 am
Fri May 22, 2015

How Could Technology Change The Way We Evolve?

Medical ethicist Harvey Fineberg says "neo-evolution" is on the horizon.
James Duncan Davidson Courtesy of TED

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 6:01 am

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Fountain Of Youth

About Harvey Fineberg's TED Talk

Medical ethicist Harvey Fineberg says "neo-evolution" is on the horizon. When it becomes easier to eliminate disease through gene therapy, will we change the trajectory of evolution?

About Harvey Fineberg

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The Two-Way
5:20 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Islamic State Reportedly Seizes Last Syria-Iraq Border Crossing

In this photo released Thursday by a website run by Islamic State militants, damaged Syrian helicopters sit at Palmyra air base, which was captured by ISIS after a battle with the Syrian government forces earlier this week.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 11:02 am

Fighters with the self-declared Islamic State have seized the last border crossing in Syria, where they control half of the country, according to a British-based monitoring group.

Syrian government forces withdrew from al-Tanf, known as al-Waleed in Iraq, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. The border crossing lies at the extreme northwest of Iraq's border with Syria.

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NPR Ed
5:03 am
Fri May 22, 2015

An Irreplaceable Replacement, This Sub Gets The Job Done

Substitute teacher Josephine Brewington receives the substitute teacher of the year award.
Courtesy of Kelly Services

One of the toughest jobs in education is the substitute teacher. The pay is low, schedules are unpredictable and respect can be hard to come by. But because the average teacher missed 11 days of school in 2012-2013, a sub like Josephine Brewington ends up playing a crucial role.

And this week — Brewington was rewarded for her efforts — winning the 2015 Substitute Teacher of the Year award.

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The Two-Way
4:39 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Irish Voters Decide Whether To Legalize Same-Sex Marriage

Nuns vote on a referendum to legalize same-sex marriage, at a polling station in County Dublin, Ireland, on Friday.
Peter Morrison AP

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 11:08 am

Voters in Ireland are deciding whether the country will amend its constitution to make same-sex marriage legal.

The vote on Friday follows months of debate in the heavily Catholic country. Opinion polls suggest the referendum will pass and Ireland will become the first country in the world to legalize same-sex marriage in a national vote.

But, as NPR's Ari Shapiro points out, "Polls in this part of the world have been totally wrong in the past.

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Goats and Soda
4:36 am
Fri May 22, 2015

How Do You Motivate Kids To Stop Skipping School?

Hanna Barczyk for NPR

It seems like a no-brainer: Offer kids a reward for showing up at school, and their attendance will shoot up. But a recent study of third-graders in a slum in India suggests that incentive schemes can do more harm than good.

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Animals
4:32 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Stuffed Tiger, Camera-Stealing Elephant Get Attention

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Television
4:32 am
Fri May 22, 2015

CBS Trashes David Letterman's 'Late Show' Set

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics
2:09 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Congressional Stalemate Threatens To Kill Phone Data Program

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 4:32 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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