NPR News

Pages

Africa
9:25 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Al-Qaida Arm In Yemen Flexes Its Muscles In Nigeria

An unusual terrorism case started in Nigeria late last week. Prosecutors in the capital city of Abuja accused two local men of being members of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP. They were charged with accepting thousands of dollars from the group to recruit potential terrorists inside Nigeria and then send them to Yemen. Olaniyi Lawal, 31, and Luqman Babatunde, 30, have pleaded not guilty.

Read more
The Salt
9:21 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Nightly Glass Of Wine May Protect Boomer Women's Bones

Cheers! Moderate drinking might slow age-related bone loss in women.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 7:00 am

It's well-known that exercise is good for our bones, even as we age, but how about that nightly glass of wine?

A new study of women in their 50s and early 60s finds that moderate alcohol consumption may help prevent bone loss. The women in the study consumed about 1 1/2 drinks per day.

Read more
Middle East
9:21 am
Thu July 12, 2012

For Syrian-American Doctors, A Painful Homecoming

Dr. Yahya Abdul Rahim (left) and Dr. Ammar Ghanem are among the Syrian-American doctors who have come to the Turkish-Syrian border to help Syrians wounded in the anti-government revolt. Some work to improve the flow of supplies; others treat patients in Turkey; still others, like Ghanem, strap backpacks on and walk across the border to help those in Syria.
Deborah Amos NPR

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 5:30 pm

The Turkish border is a key link for the revolt in neighboring Syria. Turkish ambulances are stationed at border crossings to cope with the flood of injured Syrians, often as many as 30 a day. And now, Syrian-American doctors are volunteering in a humanitarian effort to help the wounded and to bring crucial medicines for field hospitals inside Syria.

Read more
All Tech Considered
9:21 am
Thu July 12, 2012

New Online Users Have A Longer Timeline

More older adults are using the Internet, thanks in part to introductory classes offered offline.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 10:50 am

Facebook started as a social network for college students. But now that anyone can join, here's a status update: Many of its newest members are senior citizens.

At 101 years old, Florence Detlor is one of the oldest people on Facebook. She says she's always been someone who wants to keep up on the cutting edge of technology.

"Because that's what makes one time different from another," she says.

Read more
AIDS: A Turning Point
9:21 am
Thu July 12, 2012

'Treatment As Prevention' Rises As Cry In HIV Fight

While Kenya Jackson (right) is on his thrice-weekly dialysis treatment, community health worker Greg Jules talks to him about taking his medication.
Richard Knox NPR

AIDS researchers, policymakers and advocates are increasingly convinced that treating HIV is one of the best ways of preventing its spread.

The rallying cry is "treatment as prevention," and it's the overarching theme of this month's International AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C.

Read more
Around the Nation
9:21 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Waste Not, Want Not: Town To Tap Sewers For Energy

Brainerd Public Utilities' Scott Sjolund at a sewer site. Sewers around the city were monitored to gauge the amount of potential energy flowing through the system.
Conrad Wilson for NPR

Most Americans use electricity, gas or oil to heat and cool their homes. But the small city of Brainerd, Minn., is turning to something a bit less conventional: the sewer.

As it turns out, a sewer — the place where a city's hot showers, dishwashing water and organic matter end up — is a pretty warm place. That heat can generate energy — meaning a city's sewer system can hold tremendous potential for heating and cooling.

It's just that unexpected energy source that Brainerd hopes to exploit.

Read more
Around the Nation
9:21 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Man Tries To Benefit From Fake Cat's Death

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Prosecutors say no cats were harmed in the making of this news story. A man in Tacoma, Washington told a sad tale. He was involved in a car crash and two years later he said that collision had killed his cat named Tom. He filed a $20,000 insurance claim. But now, according to KOMO, he's been accused of fraud. Authorities say the cat never existed. The man allegedly backed up his claim with cat photos from the Internet. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

World
9:21 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Giant Mushroom Found In British Columbia

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Two-Way
9:07 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Paterno, Others Slammed In Report For Failing To Protect Sandusky's Victims

Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky being led away from court after his conviction last month.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 1:36 pm

In a scathing report that takes to task former head football coach Joe Paterno and other top Penn State officials, an independent report from investigators led by former FBI director Louis Freeh says there was a "total disregard for the safety and welfare" of Jerry Sandusky's child victims "by the most senior leaders" at the school.

That is "our most saddening and sobering finding," Freeh concludes about his investigation into the scandal that rocked the school last year.

Read more
Politics
8:51 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Presidential Campaigns Spar Via NAACP Convention

Transcript

MARIA HINOJOSA, HOST:

I'm Maria Hinojosa and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, California's governor has signed a landmark bill meant to protect homeowners from unfair bank and mortgage practices. We'll speak with state attorney general Kamala Harris about that in just a few minutes.

Read more
News
8:51 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Homeowner Bill Of Rights For 'Flawed System'

Guest Host Maria Hinojosa talks with Kamala Harris, California's Attorney General about the state's newly passed "Homeowner Bill of Rights." The law, which was signed yesterday by Governor Jerry Brown, makes it harder for lenders to seize a property and allows homeowners to sue to stop a foreclosure process.

Around the Nation
8:51 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Texas Rep: Voters 'Don't Have Confidence' In System

This week, a federal panel is hearing arguments for and against a voter ID law in Texas. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder says the Texas voter ID law is like a modern poll tax. Guest host Maria Hinojosa talks more about the issue with Rep. Jose Aliseda, who testified at the hearing. He's a Republican State Representative for Texas who was born in Mexico.

Deceptive Cadence
8:31 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

How Is 'Fifty Shades Of Grey' Selling Classical Music?

The book behind the unlikely re-emergence of Thomas Tallis' 'Spem in alium.'
courtesy of Vintage/Anchor Books

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 1:22 pm

File this under Strange Bedfellows. The crazy-huge success of E L James' Fifty Shades erotic trilogy — which as of late May stood at more than 10 million sales in all formats and 60 physical printings, according to publisher Vintage Books — has made quite the impact in ... classical music, of all things.

Read more
Around the Nation
1:29 pm
Sat July 7, 2012

Scranton's Public Workers Now Paid Minimum Wage

The city of Scranton, Pa., sent out paychecks to its employees Friday, like it does every two weeks. But this time the checks were much smaller than usual. Mayor Chris Doherty has reduced everyone's pay — including his own — to the state's minimum wage: $7.25 an hour.

Doherty says his city has run out of money.

Scranton has had financial troubles for a couple of decades — the town has been losing population since the end of World War II. But the budget problems became more serious in recent months as the mayor and the city council fought over how to balance the budget.

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
10:11 am
Sat July 7, 2012

Actor Tony Shalhoub Takes A Quiz About Nuns

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 1:38 pm

Tony Shalhoub is a normal guy who's become famous playing eccentric people. He was the obsessed Italian chef in Big Night, the alien pawnshop owner in the Men in Black movies, and, of course, the obsessive compulsive detective on the TV series Monk. Now, Tony has gone back to Broadway in Lend Me a Tenor.

In true "Not My Job" fashion: because Tony has played a Monk, we're going to ask him three questions about nuns.

Originally broadcast March 6, 2010

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
10:11 am
Sat July 7, 2012

Mo Moments

Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell, and here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Carl. Thanks everybody.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Listen, this week we are doing just what we are told. It's a listener request edition of WAIT WAIT. And one thing many of you asked for was an all Mo show.

(APPLAUSE)

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
10:11 am
Sat July 7, 2012

Bill Clinton Takes A Quiz About My Little Ponies

Clinton Global Initiative

In 2005, President Clinton founded the Clinton Global Initiative to address "the world's most pressing challenges." In 2011 in Chicago, Clinton hosted the CGI America meeting, with a focus on job creation and economic growth in the U.S.

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
10:11 am
Sat July 7, 2012

What's Carl This Time?

Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell, and here's your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium, in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Carl. Thanks everybody. We have got a special show for you all today. It's our second ever Listener Request show, in which we asked via Twitter and our blog, to tell us what you're favorite WAIT WAIT moments were from the last year or so.

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
10:11 am
Sat July 7, 2012

Rapper Ice-T Takes A Quiz On Pantyhose

Andrew H. Walker Getty Images

Ice-T has made a name for himself in rap, metal, breakdance movies, video games, and, most recently, on Law and Order: SVU. We're hoping to pitch him on our new idea for a TV show: Law and Order: NPR, in which we solve crimes and then encourage the still traumatized but grateful victims to pledge at any level.

Ice-T appeared in the documentary Pimps Up, Ho's Down, so we've invited him to play a game called "Pimps Up, Pantyhose Down." Three questions about a different kind of hos(e.)

Originally broadcast on May 15, 2010

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
10:11 am
Sat July 7, 2012

Rhyme Tyme

Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell, and here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Carl. Thank you everybody, you're so great. So this week, we're turning the producer's chair over to you, as we broadcast the segments and moments from the show that you told us you most wanted to hear again.

Read more

Pages