NPR News

Pages

Shots - Health News
12:27 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

How Owls Spin Their Heads Without Tearing Arteries

How does a great gray owl do that? Now we know.
Martin Meissner AP

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 4:56 am

The human neck is a delicate stem. Torque it a bit too much, and the carotid and vertebral arteries can rip, causing deadly strokes. People have torn their neck arteries riding roller coasters, doing yoga, going to the chiropractor, being rear-ended in the car – even leaning back for a beauty-parlor shampoo.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Reports: Shots Fired At Atlanta Middle School

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 2:59 pm

Shots were fired at an Atlanta middle school, this afternoon, several news outlets are reporting. The Associated Press quotes an Atlanta fire official saying that a 14-year-old had been shot at Price Middle School.

WSBTV reports that one teacher was injured and the condition of the teen is not known.

Read more
All Tech Considered
12:18 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

What's Next, A Patent For The Lines Around Apple Stores?

Apple has trademarked its minimalist store design.
U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Officially as of last week, there's nothing quite like Apple's stores. After an array of patents of its products, Apple has decided to go whole hog and trademark its minimalist store design. The trademark was approved by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Jan. 22, Reuters reported.

Read more
Sports
11:55 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Are Shooting Ranges The New Bowling Alleys?

Renee Blaine, a leader of the Leander, Texas, chapter of A Girl and A Gun during the "Girls Night Out" event.
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 7:33 am

The traditional American shooting range is extending its range.

In Summerville, S.C., for example, the ATP Gunshop & Range stages community-minded blood drives and Toys for Tots collections. Twice a week there are ladies' nights, where women can learn to fire pistols and receive free T-shirts.

Read more
NPR Story
11:22 am
Thu January 31, 2013

'Distant Witness': Social Media's 'Journalism Revolution'

A shop in Tahrir Square is spray-painted with the word "twitter" after the government shut off Internet access in February 2011 in Cairo, Egypt.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 11:22 am

When protests in Tunisia inspired a wave of revolutions known as the Arab Spring, Andy Carvin tracked the events in real time from thousands of miles away in Washington, D.C.

From the tear gas in Egypt's Tahrir Square, to the liberation of Libya, Carvin, NPR's senior strategist, used social media to gather and report the news.

In his book Distant Witness: Social Media, the Arab Spring and a Journalism Revolution, Carvin explains how he cultivated social media sources into a new form of journalism where civilians on the ground controlled the news.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:11 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Caleb Moore, Freestyle Snowmobile Rider, Dies After X Games Crash

Snomobiler Caleb Moore smiles during a Winter X Games news conference in Aspen.
Eric Lars Bakke AP

Caleb Moore, a freestyle snowmobile rider, who suffered a spectacular crash during last week's Winter X Games in Aspen, died today because of his injuries, his family said.

Moore was 25.

Here's how ESPN, which hosts the X Games, describes the incident:

Read more
Middle East
10:58 am
Thu January 31, 2013

After Benghazi Attack, Improving American Security Abroad

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 11:35 am

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) told Fox News that Secretary of State Hilary Clinton "got away with murder" for her handling of the attacks on the U.S. consulate in Libya. Ambassador Thomas Pickering, who led the independent investigation into the attacks, talks about the future of diplomatic security.

National Security
10:58 am
Thu January 31, 2013

What 'The New York Times' Hack Tells Us About China

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 11:27 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

According to The New York Times' own investigation, Chinese hackers have been attacking the newspapers' computer system for the last four months. Infiltration happened as The Times broke a story on the vast wealth accumulated by the family of the Chinese prime minister. Officials warned The Times the story would have consequences. But hacking is not anything new in China, and they're definitely not the only country doing it today. We'll look at what China's after, who they're targeting, how they do it and why.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:52 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Has Obama Done Some Skeet Shooting? Fox News Says Yes

Julian Finney Getty Images

The Washington Post's Fact Checker takes on the subject of whether President Obama was shooting straight when he told The New Republic that he has fired a gun and that "we do skeet shooting all the time" at Camp David.

And what does Fact Checker conclude?

"Verdict Pending."

Read more
The Two-Way
10:29 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Portugal's Monster: The Mechanics Of A Massive Wave

American surfer Garrett "GMAC" McNamara rides what could be, if confirmed, the biggest wave conquered in history as a crowd watches Monday in Nazare, Portugal.
To Mane Barcroft Media /Landov

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 8:07 am

Read more
The Two-Way
10:26 am
Thu January 31, 2013

After Anti-Gay Comments, 49ers Chris Culliver Says 'I Have Gay Relatives'

Chris Culliver of the San Francisco 49ers addresses the media at the New Orleans Marriott on Thursday.
Scott Halleran Getty Images

A Media Day interview has turned into a maelstrom for Super-Bowl-bound Chris Culliver, the San Francisco 49ers cornerback.

Wednesday, during a short interview with radio host Artie Lange, Culliver was asked if there were any gay players on his team.

"Nah," he answered. "We ain't got no gay people on the team. They gotta get up outta here if they do. Can't be with that sweet stuff. Nah, can't be in the locker room."

Lange went on to ask if players should stay in the closet.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:57 am
Thu January 31, 2013

U.S. Moves To Halt AB InBev's Purchase Of Grupo Modelo

A $20.1 billion merger of beer conglomerates is now delayed, after the U.S. Justice Department sued to stop Anheuser-Busch InBev's acquisition of Mexico's dominant brewer, Grupo Modelo, Thursday. The agency's antitrust division says the two corporations haven't done enough to protect consumers.

The deal would put Corona, Bud Light, Stella Artois, and other popular beers under the same corporate umbrella, ending the competition that Justice officials say has resulted in lower prices. The Mexican government approved the merger last November.

Read more
It's All Politics
9:50 am
Thu January 31, 2013

For Asian-Americans, Immigration Backlogs Are A Major Hurdle

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 10:40 am

Although the national conversation about immigration policy tends to focus on Latinos, it is Asian-Americans who encounter some of the knottiest challenges facing immigrants and immigration reformers.

Of the five countries with the longest backlogs for visas, four are in Asia.

Read more
Shots - Health News
9:43 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Should Medicare Pay For Alzheimer's Scans?

The loss of contrast between gray and white matter in this brain scan indicates a high uptake of Amyvid and the presence of amyloid plaques.
Eli Lilly & Co. and Avid Radiopharmaceuticals

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 1:18 pm

Though increasingly common, Alzheimer's disease still isn't all that easy to diagnose, especially in its early stages.

Forgetfulness and other signs of dementia can be caused by lots of things other than Alzheimer's. Sometimes the symptoms are fleeting or normal in the context of a person's age. But at other times these symptoms mark the dark path of Alzheimer's.

Doctors' standard approach to diagnosis includes taking a medical history of the patient, assessing mental function and administering various neurological and lab tests.

Read more
Africa
9:25 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Soccer: A Surprising Player In Egypt's Unrest

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 2:02 pm

Violent protests are breaking out in Egypt, just two years after a massive uprising led to the fall of the former dictator. One of the unexpected driving forces is soccer. Host Michel Martin talks to Dave Zirin, sports editor at The Nation about how the sport affects Egypt's political landscape.

The Salt
9:19 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Oh, Baby: Squeezable Snacks Might Be Tough On The Teeth

Squeeze me with caution.
Daniel M.N. Turner NPR

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 11:15 am

Those squeeze pouches full of organic pureed food in clever combos like plum, berry and barley have become a lifesaver for busy parents.

Read more
Music Reviews
9:18 am
Thu January 31, 2013

A 'Special Edition' Box Set Of Jack DeJohnette And Band

Jack DeJohnette.
Chris Griffith Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 10:13 am

On a new box set collecting the first four albums of Jack DeJohnette and his band Special Edition, two discs are gems and the other two have their moments. DeJohnette's quartet-slash-quintet was fronted by smoking saxophonists on the way up, set loose on catchy riffs and melodies. The springy rhythm section could tweak the tempos like no one this side of '60s goddess Laura Nyro.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:08 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Citing Progress, White House Disbands Jobs Council

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 9:43 am

The White House said today that it would not extend the term of its jobs council, a group of high-profile executives tapped for advice on how to improve the country's jobs situation.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:07 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Dear Lawyers: Order In The &*%# Court!

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 10:33 am

Remember the scene in the 1979 movie ... And Justice For All where Al Pacino, who is playing an attorney, loses it in court?

Read more
Africa
8:56 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Is Egypt Better Or Worse Off Now?

It's been two years since Hosni Mubarak was ousted as Egypt's President. Today, there's new leadership, but the country is still in turmoil. And some Egyptians wonder if things are changing for the best. Host Michel Martin speaks with NPR Cairo Bureau Chief, Leila Fadel, to learn more about the new Egypt.

Pages