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2:16 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Memoir Traces How Cartoonist Lost Her 'Marbles'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 6:45 am

When you think of mental illness, you don't often think of comics; but for cartoonist Ellen Forney, the two came crashing together just before her 30th birthday. That's when she found out she has bipolar disorder, a diagnosis that finally explained her super-charged highs and debilitating lows.

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The Two-Way
2:16 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Supreme Court To Look At Who Is A 'Supervisor' In Harassment Cases

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 6:44 am

The U.S. Supreme Court this week takes up the question of who qualifies as a supervisor when the issue is harassment in the workplace. The court's answer to that question could significantly restrict employer liability in racial and sexual harassment cases, or, in the view of some business organizations, it could result in frivolous litigation.

The facts of the particular case before the court Monday are, to say the least, in dispute.

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Middle East
2:16 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Under Fire, Egypt's Morsi To Meet With Judges

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 6:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Egypt's President Mohamed Morsi has granted himself almost absolute power, but has not been able to win anything like unanimous approval. The new president faces criticism for a decree stating he can do anything he thinks will advance Egypt's revolution, and that courts cannot review his decisions. Egyptians have taken to the streets in protest. Markets have reacted badly, and the country's top judges are paying Morsi a visit today to discuss this turn of events.

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Europe
2:16 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Separatists Make Gains In Catalan Elections

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 6:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now let's catch up on a vote in Catalonia, Spain's most economically powerful region. That region gave overwhelming support to pro-independence parties in elections on Sunday. This election is seen as a threat to Spain's political and financial stability, so we're going to talk about this with NPR's Sylvia Poggioli. She is in the most famous city in Catalonia, Barcelona.

And, Sylvia, we did say that there were pro-independence parties. Who exactly won these elections?

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Sports
2:16 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Notre Dame Beats USC, Moves To BCS Title Game

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 6:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

College football's wild season was not so wild this past weekend. There were no major shifts at the top of the BCS rankings as there were the week before. That's mainly because Notre Dame beat the University of Southern California on Saturday and maintained its number one ranking.

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Politics
2:16 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Young Voters Key In Obama's 2012 Win

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 6:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

This is the season when political professionals try to make sense of the last election. Plenty of Republicans have been calling for their party to take a new approach to immigration after the Hispanic vote went overwhelmingly to President Obama.

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Around the Nation
2:11 pm
Sun November 25, 2012

N.H. Group Says People, Not Taxes, Should Help Needy

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 2:33 pm

This is the time of year when people all over the country are coming together and getting food to needy families, but for one community in Manchester, N.H., private acts of charity aren't just a holiday tradition — they are a display of anarchist and libertarian principles.

On a recent day, about 50 people gathered in a converted office space with $6,000 worth of food and a list of needy families. Mike Ruff, with help from a couple of kids, filled shopping bags with food for the hungry.

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Around the Nation
2:00 pm
Sun November 25, 2012

Disaster Donations Surge, But What About Tomorrow?

A member of the Red Cross distributes food to residents of Coney Island affected by Superstorm Sandy in the Brooklyn, N.Y., on Nov. 9.
John Minchillo AP

More than $174 million in donations has been raised for those affected in New York and New Jersey by Superstorm Sandy, which devastated parts of the Atlantic coast in late October.

"The more affluent and well-insured people will figure a way to recover their lives, but there are a lot of people in New York who really won't have that capacity and can't speak out for themselves," says Stacy Palmer, the editor of the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

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Religion
1:15 pm
Sun November 25, 2012

Gay Wedding Was A Trial For The Reformed Church

Norman Kansfield and his wife, Mary, at their home in eastern Pennsylvania. Kansfield was put on trial by the Reformed Church after performing his daughter's same-sex marriage.
Lily Percy NPR

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 2:18 pm

After Massachusetts legalized same-sex marriage in 2004, Norman Kansfield's daughter asked him to perform her wedding ceremony.

Kansfield, a respected pastor, scholar and lifelong member of the Reformed Church in America, agreed to marry Ann and her long-time girlfriend. He informed the New Brunswick Theological Seminary in New Jersey, where he served as president, of his plans.

"I had thought that there would be a request for my resignation," Kansfield says. "Nobody did that."

It was a June wedding.

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Iraq
1:13 pm
Sun November 25, 2012

Brotherly Bonds Withstand Tragedy Of War

Col. Eric Schwartz (left), Dr. Najeeb Hanoudi (center) and Maj. Ron Cooper outside Hanoudi's home in Southfield, Mich.
Emily Fox

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 7:25 pm

War always leaves death, destruction and sorrow in its wake, and the Iraq War piled all of it on Dr. Najeeb Hanoudi. Yet his bond with the Americans he aided remains unbroken.

NPR's Jacki Lyden has followed the story of the Oxford-trained Christian ophthalmologist for years.

It begins in 2003, when Hanoudi first met a band of American soldiers patrolling Mansour, his upscale Baghdad neighborhood.

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Author Interviews
1:08 pm
Sun November 25, 2012

Uncovered Letters Reveal A New Side Of William Styron

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 2:00 pm

William Styron was one of the flamboyant literary figures of the 20th Century. He was a Southerner whose novel Lie Down in Darkness received immense acclaim when he was just 26 years old. He would go on to write the Confessions of Nat Turner, for which he received the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1968.

But for the last 27 years of his life, Styron did not write a novel. He battled depression, and wrote a seminal work about it, Darkness Visible, in 1990.

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Around the Nation
9:11 am
Sun November 25, 2012

A Gem Cast Off From Chicago's Architectural Crown

The Prentice Women's Hospital in Chicago was named one of the 10 most endangered historic places in Illinois by the nonprofit group Landmarks Illinois.
Kiichiro Sato AP

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 10:00 am

Walk through downtown Chicago and you experience modern architecture to its fullest. There's the Auditorium Building by Louis Sullivan, the Federal Center by Mies van der Rohe and Marina City by Bertrand Goldberg — two towers made even more famous after starring on an album cover by the Chicago band Wilco.

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Author Interviews
9:08 am
Sun November 25, 2012

Old Newspapers, New Perspectives On The American Revolution

Courtesy of Sourcebooks

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 4:33 am

Time has a way of condensing major historical events into a few key moments, with one-dimensional, legendary figures at the forefront. In his new book, author and archivist Todd Andrlik gives life and depth to one such event — the American Revolution. He uses newspaper reporting from that era to provide a sense of the Revolution as it actually unfolded.

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The Salt
3:31 am
Sun November 25, 2012

Real Chefs Grind It With A Mortar And Pestle

The mortar and pestle can be found in kitchens around the world, including Thailand. In the United States, chef Tanasapamon Rohman uses the tool to grind up chili paste and pulverize rice at her Thai restaurant.
Jessical Spengler Flickr

Originally published on Thu November 29, 2012 5:44 am

Chefs these days stock all sorts of high-tech tools, from liquid nitrogen to $500 blenders. But in kitchens throughout the world, there's one piece of technology that's been the same since the Stone Age: the mortar and pestle.

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Around the Nation
3:04 am
Sun November 25, 2012

Awash With Love: Storm Resurfaces 1940s Letters

Kathleen Chaney and her son Patrick found the storm-soaked stack of letters as they were walking along the New Jersey shore.
Lindsay Lazarski Newsworks.org

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 9:15 pm

The weekend after Superstorm Sandy, Kathleen Chaney and her son Patrick stumbled upon a bundle of letters while they were walking along the New Jersey shore near her home.

The letters were tied with a pink ribbon and thoroughly soaked. Some of the beautiful handwriting had blurred. Chaney took the bundle home, dried out the letters and began to read them.

They were written to a man named Lynn Farnham, signed by "your loving Dot." Chaney says the letters speak of true love and devotion.

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U.S.
3:04 am
Sun November 25, 2012

Despite Talk, Immigration Overhaul Not A Guarantee

Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, speaks during a news conference in the Capitol on Nov. 9. Boehner has said Republican House leaders and Obama "can find the common ground" on immigration policy.
Allison Shelley Getty Images

Now that Republicans are widely embracing an overhaul of immigration laws, even a path to legal status for illegal residents, will their members in Congress follow through?

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Europe
3:02 am
Sun November 25, 2012

Fiscal Woes Fade For Catalan's Independence Fervor

Supporters of center-right Catalan Nationalist Coalition leader Artur Mas wave pro-independence flags during the last day of campaigning in Barcelona, Spain, on Friday.
Emilio Morenatti AP

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 11:09 am

Voters in Spain's northern region of Catalonia go to the polls Sunday in a parliamentary election that is shaping up as an unofficial referendum on secession. The current Catalan president has pledged to pursue a move toward independence if re-elected.

The region, which holds 8 million people, is the country's industrial engine. Catalans are resentful that their taxes are being siphoned off for poorer regions. The prospect of secession is opposed both by the Madrid government and the European Union.

'We Are Not Spaniards'

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Africa
3:02 am
Sun November 25, 2012

Aid Workers Struggle To Provide Services In Congo

Congolese flee the eastern town of Sake, just west of Goma, on Friday. Fighting between rebel and government forces in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo has displaced at least 100,000 people.
Jerome Delay AP

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 2:47 pm

The rebel movement in the Democratic Republic of Congo has set off another humanitarian crisis. Tens of thousands of displaced villagers who fled the fighting are on the march with their belongings, and someone has to take care of them.

Into this sea of need wades Tariq Riebl, a tall 34-year-old German with a shaved head. He is the humanitarian program coordinator for the international charity Oxfam in the rebel-held city of Goma.

"Basically, what we're going to do, we have two teams," Riebl says.

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U.S.
3:28 pm
Sat November 24, 2012

Legal Pot Is Here, But Stash The Wallet For Now

Legalized marijuana in Colorado and Washington state may open the door to a new kind of tourism.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Wed November 28, 2012 2:34 pm

On Election Day, voters in Colorado and Washington state legalized the use of marijuana for recreational use. What's next?

No, really, what happens now?

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Middle East
2:48 pm
Sat November 24, 2012

Burst Of Protest In Egypt But No Revolution, Yet

Pro-democracy demonstrators occupy Cairo's Tahrir Square on Friday night. The writing on the tent reads, "Egypt is not a farm, Constitution party, Egypt for Egyptians."
AP

Cairo's Tahrir Square was nearly empty as the sun rose Saturday. A few demonstrators camped out overnight after mass protests on Friday condemned controversial decrees by Egypt's President Mohammed Morsi.

Earlier this week, Morsi gave himself unchecked powers until a constitution is written and passed by a popular referendum — in about two months. He also decreed that neither the body writing the constitution nor the upper house of Parliament could be dissolved by the courts.

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