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The Two-Way
12:45 pm
Wed October 24, 2012

Texas Attorney General Sends Warning To International Election Observers

Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott speaks to reporters 2011.
Brendan Smialowski Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 7:47 am

The Texas attorney general is warning international election observers not to mess with Texas.

"Your opinion is legally irrelevant in the United States, where the Supreme Court has already determined that Voter ID laws are constitutional," Greg Abbott wrote in a letter sent to the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, which monitors elections across the world.

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Author Interviews
12:09 pm
Wed October 24, 2012

Tom Wolfe Takes Miami's Pulse In 'Back To Blood'

Author and journalist Tom Wolfe's books include The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The Bonfire of the Vanities and I Am Charlotte Simmons, among others.
Jim Cooper AP

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 6:37 am

Tom Wolfe wrote his new novel, Back to Blood, entirely by hand. But the author of The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and The Bonfire of the Vanities also says that wasn't entirely by choice — he'd rather have used a typewriter.

"Unfortunately, you can't keep typewriters going today — you have to take the ribbons back to be re-inked," Wolfe tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies. "There's a horrible search to try to find missing parts."

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Medical Treatments
11:31 am
Wed October 24, 2012

Egg Freezing Moves Out Of Experimental Realm

Freezing women's eggs to treat infertility is no longer an experimental procedure, according to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Still, the procedure remains costly and controversial and many questions remain about the effectiveness and safety of using long-term egg-freezing.

Election 2012
11:26 am
Wed October 24, 2012

What The Presidential Debates Accomplished

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. First the Democratic debacle in the Denver debate, then a show of teeth in Tennessee, last week hells-a-poppin' at Hofstra, and this week a comparative Kumbaya in Boca. It's Wednesday and time for a...

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Horses and bayonets...

CONAN: Edition of the Political Junkie.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDINGS)

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

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Shots - Health News
11:05 am
Wed October 24, 2012

Geneticists Breach Ethical Taboo By Changing Genes Across Generations

An image of researchers at Oregon Health & Science University removing the nucleus from the mother's cell before it's inserted into the donor's egg cell.
Courtesty of Oregon Health & Science University

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 11:21 am

Geneticist reported Wednesday that they had crossed a threshold long considered off-limits: They have made changes in human DNA that can be passed down from one generation to the next.

The researchers at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland say they took the step to try to prevent women from giving birth to babies with genetic diseases. But the research is raising a host of ethical, social and moral questions.

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Music Interviews
11:05 am
Wed October 24, 2012

Stephen Colbert's Most Meaningful Musical Moments

Stephen Colbert (right) performs with Ben Folds on the set of his TV show, The Colbert Report.
Kris Long

Originally published on Fri December 7, 2012 7:12 am

Stephen Colbert loves music and loves to sing. That's why Fresh Air's Terry Gross asked him to bring a few songs that mean a lot to him and tell her why. For example, as a kid, Colbert discovered his first lesson about character acting through "King Herod's Song" from Jesus Christ Superstar, even though he thought the words were scandalous at first: "Oh, so you are the Christ? You're the great Jesus Christ. Prove to me that you're no fool. Walk across my swimming pool."

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Sports
11:04 am
Wed October 24, 2012

NFL Gig A Dream Come True For Replacement Ref

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 11:33 am

Inspired by a fellow referee who was sick with cancer, high school football ref Mike Wilmoth dropped 25 pounds, ignored the naysayers, and was picked to officiate a total of six NFL games. Wilmoth talks about making it to the big leagues and the challenges of working as a replacement ref.

The Two-Way
11:00 am
Wed October 24, 2012

Boeing Successfully Tests Electronics-Frying, Microwave Missile

Computers fried by CHAMP.
U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory

It's not the sexiest of weapons, because it doesn't cause big explosions, or fly around the world in minutes. But the effect is huge and could cripple a modern military without causing any casualties.

This week, Boeing announced that it has successfully tested a missile that can send out targeted, high-power microwaves that fry electronics without actually causing an explosion.

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The Two-Way
10:46 am
Wed October 24, 2012

Here's The List: 63 Barnes & Noble Stores Where Crooks Hacked PIN Pads

A Barnes & Noble store in San Bruno, Calif. It's on the list.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 6:41 am

If you shopped recently at 63 Barnes & Noble stores in nine states and used a credit or debit card there's a chance that thieves got hold of data about your accounts and your PIN.

As the company has announced:

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Business
10:36 am
Wed October 24, 2012

Mortgage Interest Deduction Could Be In Play

About 34 million taxpayers take the mortgage interest deduction, for a typical savings of approximately $600 a year.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 3:23 pm

In coming months, Congress will begin an epic struggle to get the federal budget deficit under control. One tax break almost certain to come into play is the mortgage interest deduction.

Both President Obama and his Republican rival, Mitt Romney, have suggested ways to scale back the deduction's value for wealthy taxpayers. And many economists are cheering them on, saying that now — when interest rates are low — would be a great time to reduce or even phase out the deduction.

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It's All Politics
10:07 am
Wed October 24, 2012

Beyond Hot Air: Political Blimps Take To Swing State Skies

A blimp with a message in support of Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney flies over Plantation, Fla., on Sunday.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 10:41 am

How do you reach an audience of more than 200,000 people a day in an important swing state without buying an expensive TV ad?

If you're Sid Overton, you build a blimp and fly it alongside one of Colorado's busiest freeways.

"It says, 'Romney For President. He Creates Jobs,' " Overton told KUNC.

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It's All Politics
9:51 am
Wed October 24, 2012

Despite Obama's Nevada Advantages, Romney Campaign Betting On State

Culinary Union members Emilia Cabrera (left) and Dallany Santos canvass in Las Vegas for the union's get-out-the-vote effort for President Obama.
Liz Halloran NPR

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 10:35 am

Pundits and prognosticators have long opined about President Obama's built-in advantages in Nevada, where he captured more than 55 percent of the vote in 2008. And with good reason.

Democrats have a commanding voter registration lead, including among Latinos, and Obama's on-the-ground effort is fueled by the 55,000-member Culinary Union and Nevada Sen. Harry Reid's formidable state party organization.

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The Two-Way
9:22 am
Wed October 24, 2012

UPDATED: Sandy, Now A Hurricane, Hits Jamaica, Sets Sights On Cuba

National Hurricane Center

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 12:49 pm

Update at 3:46 p.m. ET. Sandy Makes Landfall:

At 3:20 p.m. ET., Sandy made landfall about five miles east of Kingston, Jamaica, the Hurricane Center said in an update.

Our Original Post Continues:

The tropical cyclone Sandy has just crossed the threshold to become a hurricane.

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Shots - Health News
9:06 am
Wed October 24, 2012

How Does The Polio Vaccine Reach A Remote Corner Of The World?

Health workers transport the polio vaccine by donkey in southeastern Pakistan.
Asad Zaidi Courtesy of UNICEF Pakistan.

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 12:00 pm

In the past week, we've had a lot to say about polio — from its history in the U.S. to vaccination efforts in Nigeria and Pakistan.

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Food
9:03 am
Wed October 24, 2012

Fine Dining Turns To Familiar Favorites

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, it's time to open up the pages of the Washington Post Magazine. That's something we do just about every week for interesting stories about the way we live now. The Post's Fall Dining Guide is out this week and that means food critic Tom Sietsema has been going all over town, eating and drinking up a storm, trying to narrow down his list of favorite restaurants.

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Election 2012
8:55 am
Wed October 24, 2012

Is Early Voting A 'Quiet Revolution?'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, Apple just unveiled its new iPad Mini, but it's not the only company trying to tempt you with new gadgets. Our digital lifestyle expert, Mario Armstrong, is going to stop by to tell us what's worth checking out. That's a little later.

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Technology
8:55 am
Wed October 24, 2012

Is The iPad mini A 'Must Have' Gadget?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we'll hear about what's hot and what's not in the world of restaurants from Washington Post food critic Tom Sietsema. Interesting even if you don't eat out a lot. That's coming up later.

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Wed October 24, 2012

Equal Pay For Equal Work: Not Even College Helps Women

Barnard College graduates listen to President Barack Obama at commencement ceremonies on May 14, 2012.
Richard Drew AP

A startling new report finds freshly graduated college women will likely face this hurdle when entering the work world: they're worth less than equally educated men.

The American Association of University Women is releasing a new study that shows when men and women attend the same kind of college, pick the same major and accept the same kind of job, on average, the woman will still earn 82 cents to every dollar that a man earns.

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The Salt
7:48 am
Wed October 24, 2012

When Fire Met Food, The Brains Of Early Humans Grew Bigger

Actors Stan Laurel and Edna Marlon play at socializing around the campfire. It turns out that early man's brain developed in part thanks to cooking.
Hulton Archive Getty

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 10:08 am

If you're reading this blog, you're probably into food. Perhaps you're even one of those people whose world revolves around your Viking stove and who believes that cooking defines us as civilized creatures.

Well, on the latter part, you'd be right. At least according to some neuroscientists from Brazil.

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Shots - Health News
7:45 am
Wed October 24, 2012

The Sick Turn To Crowdfunding To Pay Medical Bills

Fundraising for medical causes is getting easier with sites like GoFundMe.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 10:14 am

Surely you've heard of crowd funding sites like Kickstarter that have helped thousands of filmmakers, musicians and painters leverage Facebook and Twitter to raise money for creative projects.

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