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The Two-Way
3:47 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

WATCH: Two Dance Videos That'll Make Your Day

A boss learning some moves from his employees.
YouTube

We'll get back to the news in no time. But first, some fun.

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The Two-Way
3:26 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Claims Of A Meteorite's Ancient Aquatic Fossils Spark Debate

Images show what researchers say could be a "hystrichosphere," a fossilized dinoflagellate cyst.
Journal of Cosmology

A meteorite that lit the sky over Sri Lanka with a yellow and green flame when it fell to earth on Dec. 29, 2012, contains "fossilized biological structures," according to researchers in Britain, Sri Lanka, and the United States. Elaborating on claims they first made in January, the scientists are also seeking to answer critics who are skeptical of their findings.

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The Two-Way
3:18 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Alleged Colorado Theater Shooter Could Face Medicated Interviews

James Holmes in a photo from the Arapahoe County (Colo.) Sheriff's Office.
AP

The judge in charge of the case against the alleged Colorado theater shooter said he would warn James Holmes that if he pleads not guilty by reason of insanity he could be drugged for interviews with the state.

Denver's ABC affiliate reports:

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Music Interviews
3:00 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

A Pioneer Of 'Chillwave,' On California's Complications

Toro y Moi's latest album is titled Anything in Return.
Andrew Paynter Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 6:48 pm

Chaz Bundick is the producer and singer-songwriter credited with pioneering a new genre of music called chillwave: a mix of electronic, hip-hop and dance music. Think house music meets R&B.

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The Salt
2:29 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Sleep Less, Eat More, Gain Weight

Less sleep equals less self-control when it comes to eating, a new study finds.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 2:11 pm

Tired? Surely those cookies will help. And a burger. Chips. And a cupcake. Yeah, soda, too.

People do eat more when they're short of sleep. And that impulse to snarf when sleepy can cause quick weight gain, according to a new study.

Since Americans are chronically sleep deprived, it's no wonder that our waistlines have been expanding. One-third of American workers say they're sleeping six or fewer hours a night, compared with the seven to nine hours recommended.

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The Two-Way
2:21 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

China Calls For Rules, U.S. Calls For End Of Cyberattacks

In separate events, the Chinese and American governments called for standards regarding cyberattacks.

The New York Times reports that in a speech, today, President Obama's national security adviser, Thomas E. Donilon, called on China to takes steps to stop the attacks.

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The Salt
2:17 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Judge Overturns New York City Ban On Big Sugary Sodas

A customer fills a 21-ounce cup with soda at a New York City McDonald's.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 5:06 pm

A New York state judge has knocked down New York City's landmark new ban on big, sugary drinks, just one day before it was set to take effect.

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Remembrances
1:49 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Remembering Lillian Cahn, Creator Of The Coach Handbag

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 2:36 pm

Lillian Cahn, co-founder of Coach Leatherwear Co., died March 4 at the age of 89. Cahn was the force behind today's high-end leather handbags.

Back in the 1960s, she and her husband, Miles Cahn, were running a leather goods business in Manhattan. They produced men's wallets and billfolds but wanted to expand.

"My wife had a great sense of style, and she made the suggestions that we men maybe were a little thoughtless about," Miles Cahn says with a laugh. "Among her many suggestions was: 'Why don't we make pocketbooks?' I like to tell people I scoffed at the suggestion."

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Around the Nation
1:47 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Owens Valley Salty As Los Angeles Water Battle Flows Into Court

Owens Lake — which dried up after losing its water source, the Owens River, to Los Angeles — is known to be a source of air pollution. The city of L.A. is in court over obligations to control dust pollution at the lake.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 3:30 pm

In the West, fights over water last a long time.

It's been almost 100 years since William Mulholland stood atop an aqueduct along the Owens River and said, "There it is, take it." He was referring to a diversion channel that started piping water to Los Angeles from 200 miles away. That water allowed L.A. to become the metropolis it is today.

But it also meant that the Owens River no longer flowed into the massive Owens Lake, which quickly dried up and became one of the biggest environmental disasters in the nation.

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It's All Politics
1:41 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Ben Carson Says No Apology Needed After Controversial Speech

Dr. Ben Carson, right, signs a book for Delegate William Frank in Annapolis, Md., on Friday.
Brian Witte AP

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 10:35 am

Anyone still looking for Dr. Ben Carson to apologize for criticizing President Obama's policies to his face at the recent National Prayer Breakfast, won't hear one in his conversation with host Michel Martin's of NPR's Tell Me More.

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It's All Politics
1:38 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Obama Team Stops Saying 'Global War On Terror' But Doesn't Stop Waging It

Standing in front of the Constitution, President Obama delivers an address on national security and terrorism in 2009 at the National Archives in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 2:36 pm

After the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, President George W. Bush often made a provocative claim: He argued that the U.S. was fighting a war without a typical battlefield. In effect, he said, this war is everywhere.

"Our enemies make no distinction based on borders," he said in a 2007 speech in Michigan. "They view the world as a giant battlefield and will strike wherever they can."

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Business
1:27 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

In Trendy World Of Fast Fashion, Styles Aren't Made To Last

Prices at stores like Forever 21 are so low, "it's virtually impossible to walk out empty-handed," says Elizabeth Cline, who writes about fast fashion.
Michael Buckner Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 2:36 pm

When she got out of college and moved to New York, Elizabeth Cline liked to shop at vintage-clothing stores. They were the kinds of places tucked away on side streets in Manhattan and Brooklyn, where a lot of hunting and a little luck might reward you with a great, inexpensive cocktail dress that no one else had.

Then she discovered the world of "fast fashion" — chains like Forever 21, H&M and Zara — and it redefined her whole notion of bargain shopping.

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The Impact Of War Project
12:51 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Four-Legged Warriors Show Signs Of PTSD

Bernie Green is a supervisor with the Department of Defense's Military Working Dog Breeding Program. Experts say dogs can suffer from PTSD-like conditions that can affect their military capabilities later on.
Ryan Loyd KSTX

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 5:04 pm

For years, PTSD — or post-traumatic stress disorder — has been an issue for military members returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.

But humans aren't the only ones with problems. Military dogs returning from war zones are also showing signs of PTSD. And there's evidence that these canines need some extra tender loving care after their tours of duty.

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The Two-Way
12:30 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Former Sen. Larry Craig Argues His Bathroom Antics Were Part Of His Work

Former Sen. Larry Craig, a Republican from Idaho.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 3:40 am

Lawyers for former Sen. Larry Craig argued today that using campaign money for a legal defense over his 2007 arrest was proper because he was arrested while on official business.

If you recall, Craig, a Republican from Idaho, was arrested during a sting at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Craig used a bathroom there during a layover, when an undercover officer said Craig sexually solicited him by tapping his foot.

Craig pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor but after his case became public he tried to renege.

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The Two-Way
12:13 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

VIDEO: Helmet-cam Records Mountain Climber's Wild Slide; He's OK

Mark Roberts' feet, in the foreground, as he slid down a mountain in Wales.
British Mountaineering Council

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 6:36 pm

This video is not for those who are squeamish about seeing others in danger. So think before you click play.

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The Salt
11:46 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Sandwich Monday: Cool Ranch Tacos

One way to identify a healthy meal is if the name of the food is written on the food.
NPR

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 11:50 am

When Taco Bell released the Doritos Locos Taco last year, taco watchers everywhere knew the Cool Ranch Taco couldn't be that far behind. It's a basic Taco Bell taco, but the shell has been coated in Cool Ranch Doritos dust.

Robert: Does Taco Bell still use the slogan "Run for the Border," or have all the rogue food scientists already escaped?

Ian: Man, this taste really takes me back to that place Nowhere In Mexico.

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The Two-Way
11:21 am
Mon March 11, 2013

In Noma's Norovirus Episode, Ignored Emails Get Some Blame

The facade of Noma in Copenhagen. More than 60 diners complained of nausea and diarrhea after eating at the widely acclaimed restaurant last month.
Dresling Jens AP

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 11:32 am

Days after news spread that Danish restaurant Noma, three-time winner of Restaurant magazine's "World's Best Restaurant" title, was blamed for a norovirus outbreak in which dozens of diners fell ill, the restaurant has issued a public response and sought to clarify its handling of the situation.

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Digital Life
11:01 am
Mon March 11, 2013

The 'Nasty Effect': How Comments Color Comprehension

Researchers found that exposure to uncivil comments can polarize opinion on news issues.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 2:56 pm

At its best, the Web is a place for unlimited exchange of ideas. But Web-savvy news junkies have known for a long time that reader feedback can often turn nasty. Now a study in the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication suggests that rude comments on articles can even change the way we interpret the news.

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Asia
11:01 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Japan's Broken Coast Struggles To Recover

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 12:53 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Opinion
11:01 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Op-Ed: We Need More Aaron Swartz-Style Hacktivism

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 12:58 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan.

And now the Opinion Page. The release of millions of academic papers by Internet activist Aaron Swartz raised many questions about how much access the public should have to scholarship, questions that took on new dimensions after his suicide. At the time of his death, Swartz faced federal charges of wire fraud and violations of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.

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