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Africa
12:27 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

In Congo, Lure Of Quick Cash Turns Farmers Into Miners

Gold miners pass up pans of sediment from an open-cast mine near the town of Mongbwalu, in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, last April.
Jonny Hogg Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 2:27 pm

One day while he was watching TV, farmer Emmanuel Tshiteta saw a news segment about people digging.

With shovels and picks, they forged deep holes, then packed the rocks they uncovered into plastic mesh bags. They carried the bags to a river to wash away the dirt, revealing handfuls of aqua-colored ore. The next day, they sold the ore for quick cash.

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The Two-Way
12:02 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Chocolatiers Lindt Loses Final Appeal To Trademark Golden Easter Bunnies

Chocolate Easter bunnies by Swiss company Lindt, left, and Austrain company Hauswirth, which agreed to stop making chocolate Easter bunnies that look like those made by Lindt & Spruengli in 2012.
Heinz-Peter Bader Reuters /Landov

After 12 years, a federal court in Germany has settled an epic Easter battle: It ruled Lindt & Spruengli, the Swiss chocolatier, could not trademark its gold-foil wrapped easter bunny chocolates.

Germany's international broadcaster Deutsche Welle reports:

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It's All Politics
11:20 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Thieves Target Political Ad Consultants On New FCC Site

A woman views a Mitt Romney campaign ad in September, a month after the launch of an online government database that is supposed to make it easier for the public to see what political ads air in big markets, and how much is spent on them.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 11:41 am

Poke into the obscure corners of the Federal Communications Commission's website, and you can find one of the deepest disclosures in campaign finance.

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Law
11:14 am
Thu March 28, 2013

The Road To The Supreme Court Arguments On Gay Marriage

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 8:27 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Celeste Headlee in Washington. Yesterday the Supreme Court heard the last of two cases involving the issue of same-sex marriage, one case on the constitutionality of California's Proposition 8. That proposition banned same-sex marriage in the state of California. The other case is on the Defense of Marriage Act.

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NPR Story
11:01 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Catching Up With The World's Youngest Female Cannonball

Elliana Grace Hentoff-Killian is on tour with the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey show Built to Amaze!
Feld Entertainment

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 12:00 pm

Elliana Grace Hentoff-Killian grew up in the circus.

She made her circus debut at age 2 and mastered her first circus act at 6, when she learned the Spanish web — an aerial act performed on a rope. Now, at 20, she is currently the youngest female human cannonball in the world.

"I never thought I was going to be doing the cannon. I was always the one sitting there saying, 'You've got to be insane to get shot out of a cannon,' " she tells NPR's Celeste Headlee. "And, of course, that's what I'm doing now."

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Digital Life
11:01 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Exploring The World's Highest Peaks From Your Couch

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 8:27 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Found Recipes
10:50 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Tuscan Pie A Sweet Springtime Take On Spinach

Tuscany's sweet spinach pie is a dish that's often associated with Easter and spring.
Courtesy of Pinella Orgiana

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 9:55 am

Easter brings with it many predictable foods: chocolate bunnies, jelly beans, ham, and hard-boiled eggs. But some Italians use the season to feature a surprisingly sweet vegetable dish on their tables.

It's called torta co'bischeri agli spinaci. Francine Segan calls it "Tuscany's sweet spinach pie." Segan is a food historian and author of Dolci: Italy's Sweets. She shared a recipe for the pie for All Things Considered's Found Recipe series.

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The Two-Way
10:30 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Students Killed As Mortar Slams Into Syrian University

A photo released by the official Syrian Arab News Agency shows bloody tables and chairs in a Damascus University cafeteria that was struck by a mortar Thursday.
AP

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 11:55 am

A mortar shell hit part of Damascus University in Syria's capital on Thursday, killing at least 10 students and wounding a number of others, according to the official Syrian news agency, which says the shell fell on an outdoor café in the architecture department.

NPR's Susannah George is following the attack from neighboring Lebanon: "State TV footage shows puddles of blood in a colorful school cafeteria, and an awning is torn above where the mortar allegedly landed."

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Shots - Health News
10:08 am
Thu March 28, 2013

'Love Your Butt' Campaign Tries To Conquer Colonoscopy Fears

Cute it may be. But will it convince you to get a colonoscopy?
loveyourbutt.org

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 10:50 am

The billboard in Washington, D.C.'s Metro stopped me in my tracks on the way to work: "Love Your Patooty."

An advertisement for yoga pants? Padded chairs? No.

Closer examination revealed it was encouraging me to get a colonoscopy.

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The Two-Way
9:27 am
Thu March 28, 2013

'Shame On Us If We've Forgotten' Newtown Victims, Obama Says

Standing in front of mothers whose children have died in shootings, President Obama said Thursday at the White House that if the nation fails to toughen its gun laws, "shame on us."

"Shame on us if we've forgotten" the 20 children and 6 educators killed three months ago at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut and all the others who have died in gun-related violence before and since then, Obama added.

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The Salt
9:18 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Mapping The Microbes That Flourish On Fruits And Veggies

You call it salad. The bacteria call it home.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 10:06 am

Deadly microbes like salmonella and E. coli can lurk on the surface of spinach, lettuce and other fresh foods. But many more benign microbes also flourish there, living lives of quiet obscurity, much like the tiny Whos in Dr. Seuss' Whoville. Until now.

Scientists at the University of Colorado have taken what may be the first broad inventory of the microbes that live on strawberries, lettuce, tomatoes and eight other popular fresh foods.

It turns out the invisible communities living on our food vary greatly, depending on the type and whether it's conventional or organic.

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Around the Nation
9:00 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Maybe We Should Retire The Word 'Retire'

The official portrait of retirement has changed, and it didn't change to this.
iStockphoto.com

Retirement ads are everywhere these days. The Villages lures retirees to come live, love and golf in Florida. USAA offers financial counsel to retiring military personnel.

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The Two-Way
8:37 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Residents Wait To Return Home After Landslide On Puget Sound Island

Houses sit near the edge of a landslide on Whidbey Island on Wednesday.
Ted S. Warren Associated Press

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 12:05 pm

Residents forced from their homes on Puget Sound's scenic Whidbey Island in Washington State are waiting for a green light from geologists and engineers after a large landslide knocked a house off its foundation and threatened to damage several others.

The landslide on the island, about 50 miles north of Seattle, measured about a quarter-mile wide and a half-mile deep, according to NBC News.

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Religion
8:31 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Bishop: 'I See Marriage As A Sacred Institution'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, if you follow sports you might have sympathy - or not - for heartbroken March Madness fans whose schools have already flunked out. We're going to ask why we care so much when our brackets are broken. That conversation is in just a few minutes. But first we want to return to two important cases being argued in the Supreme Court this week.

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The Two-Way
8:24 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Powerball Winner Owes Thousands In Child Support Payments

Powerball winner Pedro Quezada holds up a promotional check featuring his $338 million jackpot. He owes $29,000 in back child support payments, according to New Jersey law enforcement authorities.
Julio Cortez AP

Now he can catch up with his bills. Pedro Quezada of New Jersey claimed the fourth-largest jackpot in the history of the Powerball multistate lottery on Tuesday. Instead of taking the $338 million dollar prize in installments, he opted for a one-time lump sum payment of $211 million, which is the third-largest single cash prize the lottery has ever awarded.

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The Two-Way
8:06 am
Thu March 28, 2013

'Arsenal' Found At Newtown Shooter's Home; Read The Police Reports

Dec. 18, 2012: Crime scene tape stretches across the property outside the home where Adam Lanza lived with his mother, Nancy Lanza. Inside, police found weapons and other evidence.
Lucas Jackson Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 10:57 am

Police found hundreds of rounds of ammunition, guns, three photos of "what appears to be a deceased human covered with plastic" and other evidence when they searched the Newtown, Conn., home of killer Adam Lanza, according to records released Thursday.

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The Two-Way
7:39 am
Thu March 28, 2013

UPDATED: N. Korea Responds To U.S. Bomber Training Run Over Korean Peninsula

A U.S. Air Force B-2 stealth bomber flies near Osan U.S. Air Base in Pyeongtaek, south of Seoul, on Thursday.
Shin Young-keun AP

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 5:00 pm

The U.S. military is making no secret about a training flight by a pair of nuclear-capable B-2 stealth bombers from a base in the American Midwest to the Korean Peninsula — what's being described as an "extended deterrence mission."

The flight of the two radar-evading bombers "demonstrates the United States' ability to conduct long range, precision strikes quickly and at will," the United States Forces Korea said in a press release Thursday.

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Music Interviews
7:21 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Emmylou Harris And Rodney Crowell: Harmonizing To That 'Old Yellow Moon'

Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell have been friends and collaborators since the 1970s. Their new album together is called Old Yellow Moon.
David McClister Nonesuch Records

Emmylou Harris' first solo album, "Pieces of the Sky," was released in 1975 after the death of her singing partner, Gram Parsons. The opening track on the album is a song called "Bluebird Wine," by a then-unknown songwriter named Rodney Crowell. She recorded two more of his songs on her next album, got him to join her band in the mid-'70s and now, after an almost 40-year friendship, the two musicians have recorded an album together called Old Yellow Moon. The two talk with Terry Gross about their long, enduring careers, their friendship, their influences and singing harmony.

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Shots - Health News
7:11 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Why More Patients Should Blog About Illness And Death

David Oliver sits quietly as he waits for the results of a scan at Ellis Fischel Cancer Center in Columbia, Mo., in 2012. The University of Missouri research professor was diagnosed with cancer in September 2011. He broke the news to colleagues via a video on the Internet.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 12:51 pm

I entered the world of illness blogs for the first time when I learned through Facebook that a friend from middle school passed away last Friday from acute myeloid leukemia. In the three months between his diagnosis and his death, the friend, whom I'll call Tom, blogged beautifully and intimately on CaringBridge, a Web tool designed to help the seriously ill tell their stories and manage communication with friends and family.

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The Two-Way
6:41 am
Thu March 28, 2013

'Historic' Web Attack Didn't Cripple The Internet And Is Over Anyway

Huge amounts of data were flying, but the attack didn't cause major problems around the world, Internet monitors say.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 8:49 am

There's much angst over the cyberattack that we and others reported about Wednesday — a denial-of-service broadside allegedly aimed at an anti-spam group by a Dutch hosting company, Cyberbunker. It led to reports about, supposedly, major congestion on the Web.

Well, there are two things everyone needs to know this morning:

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