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The Two-Way
7:29 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Poll: Public Expects Attacks, But Boston Doesn't Add To Fear

In Boston and other places across the nation, people gathered Monday for a moment of silence to honor the victims of the marathon bombing.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 8:38 am

The Boston Marathon bombings "riveted most Americans" and seemed to "confirm the public's long-held belief that occasional terrorist acts are to be expected," the Pew Research Center says.

In a report released Tuesday morning, it adds that:

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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Embassy Bombed In Libya; Canada Train Plot Suspects In Court

Libyan security forces gather outside the French Embassy in Tripoli following a car bomb blast on Tuesday.
Mahmud Turkia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 1:56 pm

Update at 4:20 p.m. ET:

The BBC reports that one of the two suspects, Chiheb Esseghaier, told the court that the case against him was "made based on acts and words which are only appearances."

He declined representation. Raed Jaser made no statement in court. Neither suspect entered a plea on Tuesday.

According to the BBC:

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The Two-Way
5:45 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Early Thinking: Boston Suspects Were Working On Their Own

Dzhokhar (at left) and Tamerlan Tsarnaev allegedly killed an MIT police officer, carjacked a vehicle and engaged in a gun battle with police soon after authorities distributed this image of the brothers walking near the finish line of the Boston Marathon just before two bombs exploded. Tamerlan, 26, died from injuries he received. Dzhokhar, 19, was captured Friday night.
FBI.gov

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 5:49 pm

(Most recent update: 8:39 p.m. ET.)

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Around the Nation
5:41 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Shot Putter Donates Bone Marow To A Stranger

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 12:05 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
5:22 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Whimsical Idea Expands To Chinese Food Mission

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 12:05 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

It was just a whimsical idea back in the '70s. David Chan and his co-workers decided to try every Chinese restaurant in the neighborhood. Now, the 64-year-old Los Angeles attorney has visited more than 6,000 Chinese eateries around the world. The L.A. Times says he once hit 300 restaurants in a single year. You'll find Chan using a fork. He's not a chopsticks guy.

He often gives advice to restaurant critics. Chan says he's always just been a collector - stamps, records - now dumplings.

The Two-Way
5:21 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Book News: Bush Library Exhibit Puts You In President's Shoes

The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum officially opens this week in Dallas, Texas.
Mladen Antonov AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Politics
2:46 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Boston Case Casts Shadow Over Senate Immigration Hearing

The Senate Judiciary Committee turned its attention back to the immigration overhaul proposal Monday, even as opponents began to use the Boston bombers' journey to the United States as a cautionary tale.

Around the Nation
2:34 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Mississippi River Communities Brace For Flooding

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 12:05 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now here's a change. Earlier this year, the worst drought conditions seen in the Midwest in decades threatened to close the Mississippi River to barge traffic. Now, communities along the river in Missouri and Illinois are bracing for flooding.

St. Louis Public Radio Maria Altman reports.

MARIA ALTMAN, BYLINE: The threat of flooding on the Mississippi River came on quickly after last week's storms dumped rain across the Midwest. The town of Clarksville, Missouri didn't even have time to erect its metal flood wall.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
2:34 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Deciphering Foreign Versus Domestic Terrorism

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 3:53 am

Steve Inskeep talks with Karen Greenberg, Director of Fordham University's Center on National Security, about defining terrorism, what it means to call an act domestic versus international terrorism and the political ramifications.

The Salt
12:47 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Newspaper Takes The Pulse Of San Diego Coffee Culture

John Rippo in July 2012 in a coffeehouse called Espresso Mio, in San Diego's Mission Hills neighborhood.
Courtesy of Josh Bletchely

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 12:51 pm

Portland and Seattle may take coffee very seriously, but San Diego can boast a newspaper devoted entirely to coffee shops and all the news that's fit to print about them. John Rippo is the publisher of The Espresso, and he's convinced that coffee shops are the places to catch juicy moments of the human experience as they happen.

Inspired by European periodicals written for the cafe intelligentsia, Rippo curates local news in his monthly paper to inspire his fellow San Diego residents to social or political action.

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Author Interviews
12:46 am
Tue April 23, 2013

For TV Networks, Stiff Competition To Be 'Top Of The Morning'

Grafissimo iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 12:05 pm

Last spring, what NBC fondly refers to as "America's First Family" went through a very public divorce. Ann Curry, who spent more than a decade as a news anchor on the Today show and less than a year as a host, was unexpectedly axed. "For all of you who saw me as a groundbreaker," Curry said with emotion in her last morning broadcast, "I'm sorry I couldn't carry the ball over the finish line. But man, I did try."

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The Salt
12:44 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Journey Of A Specialty Coffee Bean, From Cherry To Cup

Coffee beans are raked to dry in the sun in western Guatemala.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 1:12 pm

When we wanted to know how the growth of the specialty coffee movement is influencing the lives of farmers, we took a trip to the mountainous region of Huehuetenango in Guatemala.

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The Changing Lives Of Women
12:42 am
Tue April 23, 2013

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

Lucy Wang and Derek Wei represent the new modern Chinese bride and groom. With a lack of women in China, Wei had to pay more than $10,000 in a "bride price" to attract Wang to marry him.
Sim Chi Yin for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 12:05 pm

Women hold up half the sky, China's Chairman Mao famously said. But in China, the one-child policy and the traditional preference for boys mean that 117 boys are born for every 100 baby girls. By one estimate, this means there could be 24 million Chinese men unable to find wives by the end of the decade.

As China's economy booms, the marriage market has become just that: a market, with new demands by women for apartments and cars.

But are women really benefiting from their scarcity?

Let's Make A Deal

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NPR Story
6:52 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Singer Richie Havens Dies

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. If he had done nothing else, Richie Havens would have had a secure place in American music history as the performer who opened Woodstock, on Aug. 15, 1969.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING

RICHIE HAVENS: (Singing) Freedom, freedom, freedom, freedom, freedom, freedom, freedom, freedom...

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It's All Politics
4:38 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Immigration Overhaul Seems On Track Despite Boston Tragedy

Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. (right), talks during a hearing at which he angered Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa (far left). Grassley thought Schumer was accusing him of using the Boston bombings as an excuse to slow or kill the immigration overhaul.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 6:36 pm

No sooner did the first reports emerge that the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings were Chechen immigrants than did that fact intrude into Washington's debate on immigration.

Opponents of immigration reform seized on the fact to raise doubts about efforts to change immigration laws to, in part, bring the estimated 12 million people now in the U.S. illegally out of limbo.

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The Record
4:30 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Richie Havens, Folk Singer Who Opened Woodstock, Has Died

The crowd at Richie Havens' Woodstock-opening set on Aug. 15, 1969.
Paul DeMaria New York Daily News via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 12:05 pm

Richie Havens once told NPR that he believed all music is folk music. Listen to Havens speak about Woodstock, Greenwich Village and why he loved performing in Neda Ulaby's remembrance, broadcast on Morning Edition, at the audio link on this page.

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The Two-Way
4:27 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Father Saves Boy From Alligator Attack, With A Stranger's Help

A Fish and Wildlife Service team caught and killed an alligator after the animal attacked a 6-year-old boy Friday. The boy survived with only incidental wounds.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Originally published on Tue April 23, 2013 12:05 pm

A 6-year-old boy's day off from school Friday left him with a vivid story to tell his classmates, after he was seized — and eventually released — by an alligator in South Florida. The attack occurred at a wildlife refuge near Boynton Beach, Fla., where Joseph Welch had taken his son, Joey, for a canoe ride.

As Welch, a native of Rhode Island who now lives in Pompano Beach, says in a Morning Edition interview airing Tuesday, his idea had been to do "something new and different."

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The Two-Way
4:16 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Half Of Guantanamo Detainees Now On Hunger Strike

We told you last week about an increase in the number of prisoners on hunger strike at Guantanamo Bay. This week, that number has risen further – to cover half of all inmates at the U.S. detention facility; also, 1 in 10 inmates is now being force fed.

Eighty-four of the 166 prisoners at the camp are on hunger strike, the U.S. military said Sunday; 16 of them are being force fed through tubes.

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The Two-Way
3:12 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Former Teacher Charged For Child Porn Detained In Nicaragua

Eric Justin Toth.
FBI

Nicaraguan authorities say they have detained Eric Justin Toth, a former teacher at a Washington, D.C., private school accused of producing child pornography.

Back in April 2012, Toth took Osama bin Laden's place on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted list.

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The Two-Way
3:03 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Anthony Weiner Makes Twitter Comeback

U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner announces his resignation from Congress on June 16, 2011, in New York. The disgraced former congressman is reportedly considering a run for New York mayor.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 3:14 pm

Anthony Weiner is back — on Twitter, that is.

The disgraced politician who resigned his congressional seat after sending sexual images to female followers on the social networking site — and then lying about it — rejoined Twitter on Monday.

As of 5:50 p.m. ET, Weiner had 4,322 followers.

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