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12:30 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Army Vs. National Guard: Who Gets Those Apache Helicopters?

An airborne Apache attack helicopter takes off above a Black Hawk helicopter from the South Carolina Army National Guard base in Eastover, S.C., in 2007. The Army is planning to move all the National Guard's Apache helicopters to the regular Army, a move opposed by many in the Guard.
Mary Ann Chastain AP

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 3:38 pm

For decades the National Guard has fought hard against the stereotype that it was the place to avoid the draft during the Vietnam War, or that it's a place to get college money rather than combat duty.

Guard leaders thought that after more than a decade of war in Afghanistan and Iraq they had finally earned some respect. So it was a body blow when the Army's top officer, Gen. Ray Odierno, unveiled his plan on Capitol Hill to take all of the National Guard's Apache helicopters and move them to the regular Army.

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NPR Story
12:17 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

North Korea Steps Up Nuclear Activity Ahead Of Obama Visit

President Obama arrives in Japan on tomorrow amid reports that North Korea might carry out a fourth underground nuclear test to coincide with the president’s trip.

The reports about the possible test come from the South Korean Defense Ministry, which says it has spotted several activities related to a possible nuclear test in Punggye-ri in North Korea.

Jim Walsh, an expert on North Korea and international security, discusses this with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

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NPR Story
12:17 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Tension Remain High In Ukraine

In Kiev today, Vice President Joe Biden said Russia must stop talking and start acting to defuse the crisis in Crimea.

The vice president’s visit comes as three men killed in an attack on a pro-Russian camp on Sunday were buried.

The BBC’s Natalia Antelava is visiting the town of Lugansk, a pro-Russian stronghold, and reports on the debate between those loyal to Kiev and those loyal to Moscow.

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NPR Story
12:17 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

What Do We Have To Teach Plato?

A marble statue of ancient Greek philosopher Plato stands in front of the Athens Academy, in Athens. (Dimitri Messinis/AP)

In her book “Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won’t Go Away,” philosopher and writer Rebecca Newberger Goldstein imagines Plato on a U.S. book tour, speaking at Google, on a cable TV show and debating child-rearing at the 92nd Street Y in New York City.

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The Salt
11:27 am
Tue April 22, 2014

We Didn't Believe In 'Artisanal' Toast, Until We Made Our Own

Fire-roasted toast will satisfy the smoke fiends at the breakfast table.
Eliza Barclay/NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 12:24 pm

Leave it to San Francisco to turn one of the simplest — and cheapest — dishes into the trendy snack du jour.

We're talking about toast.

"Artisanal" toast is made from inch-thick, snow-white or grainy slices, lathered in butter and cinnamon or peanut butter and honey, then wrapped individually in wax paper.

And you think that latte is expensive. Each one of these slices will set you back at least $3.50.

The toast craze started at an unlikely location: a modest coffee shop, called Trouble, about four blocks from San Francisco's sleepy Ocean Beach.

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The Two-Way
11:23 am
Tue April 22, 2014

45 People Were Shot In Chicago Over The Weekend

The Chicago skyline. The city's police chief says his officers can't keep up with the number of illegal weapons on the city's streets.
Carolyn Kaster AP

There are more data to add to Chicago's well-documented problem with gun violence.

Headlines such as this from the Chicago Sun-Times — "In violent weekend, at least 8 dead, 37 wounded in shootings across Chicago" — set us off in search of news reports after previous weekends.

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The Two-Way
10:34 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Tattoo Of Buddha Gets British Tourist Thrown Out Of Sri Lanka

British tourist Naomi Coleman displays the tattoo that has gotten her deported from Sri Lanka.
Lakruwan Wanniarachchi AFP/Getty Images

The island nation of Sri Lanka has ordered the deportation of a British tourist for arriving in the country sporting a Buddha tattooed on her arm. Authorities say the ink shows disrespect for religious feelings in the majority-Buddhist nation.

Naomi Coleman, 37, says she got through immigration at the airport near the capital, Colombo, without incident, despite wearing a short-sleeved shirt that exposed the tattoo of a Buddha seated on a bed of lotus flowers.

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Law
9:26 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Supreme Court Rules On Race-Based College Admissions

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 9:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

The Supreme Court this morning, upheld a ban on using racial preferences in admissions to the public universities of Michigan. The ban was enacted by referendum as an amendment to the state constitution in 2006 and struck down by a lower court. Today, the justices voted 6-to-2 to say the federal courts could not do that and the ban had to stand.

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The Two-Way
9:01 am
Tue April 22, 2014

'Stop Supporting Men Hiding Behind Masks,' Biden Tells Russia

Vice President Biden and Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk spoke with reporters Tuesday in Kiev.
Sergey Dolzhenko EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 2:28 pm

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The Two-Way
8:47 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Louisiana Lawmaker Pulls Bill To Make Bible State's Official Book

A parishioner holds the Holy Bible during a service. A Louisiana bill that would have made the Bible the state's official book has been withdrawn.
Kevin Rivoli The Post-Standard /Landov

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 10:12 am

The sponsor of a bill to make the Holy Bible the official book of Louisiana has withdrawn the measure ahead of a full vote in the state House of Representatives, saying the proposal has become a distraction.

As we reported last week, a mix of Republicans and Democrats had moved the largely symbolic bill, sponsored by Rep. Thomas Carmody of Shreveport, out of committee on an 8-5 vote.

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Shots - Health News
8:03 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Change Your Income, Change Your Health Insurance Plan

iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 8:11 am

People who qualified for subsidies under the Affordable Care Act aren't necessarily locked into the plan they chose. And that can be good news for people whose income fluctuates during the year. Here's our response to the latest reader questions on coverage through the health exchanges.

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The Two-Way
8:01 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Study: 2 In 5 Americans Earning Degrees After High School

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 10:37 am

America may have a shot at rejoining the world's most educated nations by 2025, according to a report released Monday by the Lumina Foundation.

The Indianapolis-based foundation's annual report finds some encouraging data to counter the familiar story of a nation that is famed for its colleges and universities but trails many other countries when it comes to the percentage of people with a degree beyond high school.

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The Two-Way
7:24 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Supreme Court Upholds Michigan's Ban On Affirmative Action

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette speaks to reporters after arguing the case before the U.S. Supreme Court in October. He's with XIV Foundation CEO Jennifer Gratz, who was a plaintiff in a lawsuit against the University of Michigan's affirmative action policy.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 9:54 am

The Supreme Court has ruled that a Michigan ballot initiative to ban racial preferences in college admissions is constitutional, overturning a lower court decision.

In a 6-2 decision Tuesday, the justices said the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals was wrong to set aside the voter-approved ban as discriminatory.

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The Two-Way
6:40 am
Tue April 22, 2014

UPDATE: Everest Climbing Season Still In Doubt

Family members of the Mount Everest avalanche victims were lighting oil lamps Sunday at a Sherpa Monastery in Katmandu, Nepal.
Prakash Mathema AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 11:03 am

Update at 12:30 p.m. ET. Despite Government's Concessions, Many Sherpas May Leave:

The likelihood of the upcoming climbing season on Mount Everest being canceled altogether seemed to veer from very possible to very unlikely to somewhere in between within the space of less than an hour on Tuesday as news reports came in from the world's tallest mountain.

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Around the Nation
5:13 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Feds Say Powdered Alcohol Not Ready Yet

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 9:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Stop the presses, as they used to say before news was spread by Twitter. You will not be making drinks with powdered alcohol yet. We reported yesterday on plans to sell Palcohol mixed drinks to which, like lemonade, you just add water. Now federal regulators say stop, they were wrong to say Palcohol was ready for market. A federal approval for the label was given in error. The company must have a drink and start again.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:13 am
Tue April 22, 2014

49ers Fans Seeing Red Over Transit Color Proposal

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 9:34 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Two-Way
5:12 am
Tue April 22, 2014

As Korean Ferry Sank, Some Crew Members Fought To Save Lives

As the sun set on Tuesday, recovery operations continued at the site of the ferry disaster off South Korea's southern coast.
Issei Kato Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 10:57 pm

With the death toll continuing to rise and likely to exceed 300, the captain and crew of the ferry that sank last week off the coast of South Korea have been called cowards and accused of murder.

Now, though, we're also hearing about the heroic acts of some among the 29-member crew — seven of whom either are confirmed to have died or are missing.

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Law
4:16 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Supreme Court Case Could Change How You Watch TV

An economic model is being challenged in the Supreme Court on Tuesday in a battle between broadcast television networks and the startup Aereo Inc. The issues focus on copyright law, but the outcome could alter broadcasting in the U.S.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 6:42 am

Bruce Springsteen may have been ahead of his times with his song "57 Channels (And Nothin' On)," released in 1992. These days there are hundreds of channels, and whether you like it or not, you get most of them in your basic cable package. On Tuesday, that economic model is being challenged in the Supreme Court in a high-stakes legal battle between the broadcast television networks and a tiny startup, or at least tiny by broadcast standards.

The issues focus on copyright law, but the outcome could alter the face of broadcasting in the United States.

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Krulwich Wonders...
4:10 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Introducing A Divorce Rate For Birds, And Guess Which Bird Never, Ever Divorces?

Robert Krulwich/NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 4:06 pm

There is love. And then there's albatross love.

In his new book, The Thing With Feathers, Noah Strycker says albatrosses have a knack for coupling. "These globe trotters, who mate for life and are incredibly faithful to their partners, just might have the most intense love affairs of any animal on our planet," he writes.

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The Two-Way
4:10 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Wheel Well Stowaway Was 'Runaway Kid With A Bad Idea'

Hawaiian Airlines Flight 45 after its arrival on Monday at Maui's Kahului Airport. After the same flight landed on Sunday, a California teen emerged from the left rear wheel well.
Oskar Garcia AP

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 9:20 am

The California teenager who survived a 5 1/2 hour flight to Hawaii in the wheel well of a Boeing 767 was "just a runaway kid with a bad idea," FBI Special Agent Tom Simon says.

Simon also says, according to The San Jose Mercury News, that the unidentified boy's lousy idea wasn't very well thought out: "He ran for the nearest plane. This was not a well-planned thing."

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