The Two-Way
5:47 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Jobless Claims Were Nearly Unchanged Last Week

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 5:57 am

There were 339,000 first-time claims filed for unemployment insurance last week, down slightly from 341,000 the week before, the Employment and Training Administration says.

According to The Associated Press, the slight decline is "evidence that layoffs are low and hiring will likely remain steady."

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The Two-Way
4:45 am
Thu January 2, 2014

100 Million People In Path Of 2014's First Wintry Blast

Snow was falling fast Thursday morning in Albany, N.Y.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 8:29 pm

Updated 11:30 p.m. ET

The Associated Press reports: "The National Weather Service said 21 inches of snow had fallen in Boxford, just north of Boston, by Thursday night, while other parts of the state had 17 or 18 inches. It said parts of upstate New York had 18 inches."

The New York Times reports:

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Around the Nation
4:27 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Twins Born Minutes Apart But In Different Years

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 4:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. If little Lorraine Begazo turns out like many big sisters, she'll lord it over her brother Brandon that she's the older one. And she was born the year before he was. The news is that they're twins. Lorraine was born two minutes before midnight on New Year's Eve 2013. Brandon came along one minute after we rang in 2014. The twins' father says they'll celebrate with two cakes and blow out the candles over two years. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
3:47 am
Thu January 2, 2014

VIDEO: Stranded Passengers Flown To Safety In Antarctic

Help arrives: an image from video taken as a helicopter landed Thursday on an ice floe in the Antarctic. The copter then carried passengers from a stranded ship to another vessel waiting nearby in open waters.
Intrepid Science

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 5:51 am

After more than a week aboard a ship stuck in ice off Antarctica, 52 scientists and paying passengers from the Russian ship MV Akademik Shokalskiy are either aboard or headed to an Australian icebreaker that will now take them to warmer waters.

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Pop Culture
3:37 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Isaac Asimov Right On With Some 2014 Predictions

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 4:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

Fifty years ago, science fiction writer Isaac Asimov made a series of predictions about 2014, and he was right. He foresaw gadgets that relieve mankind of tedious jobs, like machines that heat water and prepare coffee. He predicted smartphones, noting we'd be able to see and hear someone we call, and be able to look at photos on the same screen. He even knew Twitter and reality TV were coming, writing, quote: Mankind will suffer badly from the disease of boredom.

National Security
3:04 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Is U.S. Ready Rethink Sept. 11 Security Policies?

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 4:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. President Obama says he will soon propose changes at the National Security Agency. Former contractor Edward Snowden's disclosure of NSA surveillance programs widespread criticism and prompted a review of the agency's operations by Congress, the courts, and the White House. NPR's Tom Gjelten looks at whether the country is now at a turning point, ready to rethink the security policies in place since 9/11.

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Africa
2:22 am
Thu January 2, 2014

South Sudan Peace Talks Begin, Fighting Persists

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 4:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Our colleague Gregory Warner was reporting in South Sudan recently and he described something ominous. As he put it, people are starting to ask who their neighbors are. It suggested that a violent political struggle in Africa's youngest country could erupt into a civil war fueled by tribal differences. Today, South Sudan's warring factions will meet for the first time in neighboring Ethiopia. This comes as fighting still rages. Here again, NPR's Gregory Warner.

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NPR Story
2:22 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Fiat Pays $4.3 Billion To Get Complete Control Of Chrysler

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 4:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Fiat and Chrysler.

The Italian automaker Fiat has paid $4.3 billion to gain complete ownership of Chrysler. The agreement announced yesterday is not a big surprise. Fiat already held a majority share of the Detroit automaker that produces Chrysler, Jeep and Dodge vehicles.

Industry analysts say this final step in the merger creates a global company that's better able to compete with the likes of General Motors, Toyota and Volkswagen. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
2:22 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Saudi Arabia To Give Military Aid To Lebanon

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 8:29 am

Lebanon has announced Saudi Arabia will give it $3 billion to buy weapons. To explain the significance of this gift, Renee Montagne talks to Aram Nerguizian, a senior fellow with the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

The Salt
2:22 am
Thu January 2, 2014

How Mass-Produced Meat Turned Phosphorus Into Pollution

A dead carp floats in water near the shore at Big Creek State Park on Sept. 10 in Polk City, Iowa. Like many agricultural states, Iowa is working with the EPA to enforce clean-water regulations amid degradation from manure spills and farm-field runoff.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 7:27 am

It's a quandary of food production: The same drive for efficiency that lowers the cost of eating also can damage our soil and water.

Take the case of one simple, essential chemical element: phosphorus.

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