Shots - Health News
11:47 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Lose Weight Before Trying Other Sleep Apnea Treatments

CPAP masks have become much more comfortable than in years past, doctors say. But most of the time, they're probably not the first thing to try for sleep apnea.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 1:06 pm

So your snoring is driving your partner crazy. Does that mean you're destined for one of those awkward-looking sleep apnea masks?

Not so fast, doctors say. Many snorers don't have sleep apnea, which causes a person to frequently stop breathing for brief periods during sleep. It's a big cause of chronic sleepiness and has been linked to a variety of health problems. Sleep apnea can also make a sufferer miserable.

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Parallels
11:38 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Brazilian President Lashes Out Over U.S. Spying

Not Happy: Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff addresses the 68th U.N. General Assembly in New York on Tuesday.
Shannon Stapleton Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 11:56 am

President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil was so angry about reports that the National Security Agency was spying on her and others in her country that she recently called off a high-profile visit to the U.S.

The Brazilian leader was still in a fighting mood Tuesday as she used her speech at the United Nations General Assembly to deliver a broadside against U.S. spying. She also called for civilian oversight of the Web to ensure the protection of data.

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The Protojournalist
11:29 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Why Are Most Rampage Shooters Men?

A makeshift memorial hangs on a lamp post across the street from the Washington Navy Yard, on Sept. 20.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Aaron Alexis, the man who police say killed more than a dozen people at the Washington Navy Yard on Sept. 16, has joined a heinous parade of mass murdering shooters, nearly all men.

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The Two-Way
11:06 am
Tue September 24, 2013

NCAA Lifts Some Of The Sanctions Imposed On Penn State

Penn State football players run onto the field earlier this month in State College, Pa.
Gene J. Puskar AP

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 2:18 pm

Citing what it says has been "Penn State's continued progress toward ensuring athletics integrity," the NCAA said Tuesday that it is gradually restoring the football scholarships the school lost in the aftermath of the child sex abuse scandal involving former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky.

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Health
10:11 am
Tue September 24, 2013

NIH, CDC Announce Clinical Trial On Valley Fever

National Institutes of Health director Dr. Francis Collins describes the valley fever clinical trial during a two-day symposium on the disease in Bakersfield.
Henry Barrios The Bakersfield Californian

The National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will undertake a clinical trial to learn more about valley fever, agency leaders announced Monday at the start of a two-day symposium on valley fever, hosted by Bakersfield Congressman Kevin McCarthy.

"There are so many things we don't know about valley fever, and the best way to get the answers is to run a clinical trial," said National Institutes of Health director Dr. Francis Collins.

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The Two-Way
9:39 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Carnival's Earnings Hit By String Of Cruise Ship Problems

Part of the previously submerged, severely damaged right side of the Costa Concordia cruise ship is seen in an upright position last week after it was righted by salvage crews in Isola del Giglio, Italy.
Marco Secchi Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 12:18 pm

Miami-based Carnival Corp., the world's largest cruise operator, reported a third quarter profit nearly a third lower than a year ago following a series of embarrassing and deadly mishaps involving its ships.

Carnival turned a $934 million profit for the period June through August, down 30 percent from the same quarter in 2012.

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Music Reviews
9:34 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Lucy Schwartz Is In Love With Her Own Voice, And That's OK

Lucy Schwartz.
Tierney Gearon Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 12:16 pm

The first thing you notice about Lucy Schwartz's Timekeeper is the singer's voice — both her physical voice, which is at once ringing and adroit, and her writer's voice, which is precise yet elusive. When Schwartz sings "Ghost in My House," the production renders her tone in an echoing manner that signifies spookiness. It also suggests a metaphor — memory as a ghost, the haunting of someone who's no longer in her life. In general, Lucy Schwartz is in love with the sound of her own voice, and for once that phrase is not meant as a criticism; I think she has good reason to be.

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Parallels
9:28 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Why Kenya Is An Inviting Target For Terrorists

Kenyans watch Monday as a plume of black smoke rises over the Westgate Mall, scene of a terrorist attack that left more than 60 dead. Kenya is a crossroads in East Africa, has many links to the West and has sent troops into Somalia. For all these reasons, the country was targeted by Somalia's al-Shabab militia group.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 2:35 pm

Kenya has long been an African success story, a place that's been relatively stable, peaceful and prosperous despite being in a neighborhood rocked by major disasters for decades.

There's been endless civil war in Somalia, genocide in Rwanda and famine in Ethiopia. Yet these calamities have, by and large, not spilled over to Kenya, which has been the crossroads of East Africa, serving as a business, transportation and tourist hub.

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Parallels
8:55 am
Tue September 24, 2013

World Economic Growth Points To More Planes In Asian Skies

An Airbus A320 on display during Airshow China 2012 at China International Aviation Exhibition Center in Zhuhai on Nov. 13, 2012. Increasing prosperity and urbanization in China and elsewhere in Asia will drive the global demand for aircraft, Airbus said Tuesday.
Marina Lystseva ITAR-TASS/Landov

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 2:25 pm

The number of global megacities will grow from 42 today to 89 by 2032. The global middle class will more than double by then. And most of this growth will be in the Asia-Pacific region.

What does all this have to do with global aviation?

Airbus, which released the data Tuesday, says that to meet this demand nearly 30,000 new planes will have to be built over the next 20 years.

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Health Care
8:48 am
Tue September 24, 2013

Questions Rise As Health Care Exchange Draws Near

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 1:25 pm

Enrollment in the Affordable Care Act health exchanges is set to begin Oct. 1. But many eligible Americans still have questions.

Tell Me More reached out to listeners via Facebook and Twitter in an attempt to help answer their questions about the law. Host Michel Martin spoke with Mary Agnes Carey, a senior correspondent at Kaiser Health News — a news service not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

On searching for other affordable care options

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