Music Interviews
11:03 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Dave Matthews Takes John Denver's Music 'To Tomorrow'

Album cover

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 7:31 am

By the time John Denver died in a plane crash in 1997, he had written and sung a remarkable assortment of cherished music: "Rocky Mountain High," "Take Me Home, Country Roads," "Sunshine on My Shoulders," "Leaving on a Jet Plane" and many more. He was often mocked by edgier musicians for being a kind of musically soft, spongy Wonderbread of a singer-songwriter. But his songs have endured — and influenced more than one generation.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:51 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Limericks

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 8:25 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Coming up, it's Lightning Fill in the Blank. But first, it's the game where you have to listen for the rhyme. If you'd like to play on air, call or leave a message at 1-888-Wait-Wait, that's 1-888-924-8924. You can click the Contact Us link on our website, waitwait.npr.org. There you can find out about attending our weekly live shows right here at the Chase Bank Auditorium in Chicago, and our show later this summer on August 29th at Tanglewood in Lenox, Massachusetts. Hi, you're on WAIT, WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:51 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 8:25 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now it is time for our final game Lightning Fill in The Blank. Each of our players will have 60 seconds in which to answer as many fill in the blank questions as he or she can. Each correct answer is now worth two points. Carl, can you give us the scores?

CARL KASELL: We have a tie for first place, Peter. Alonzo Bodden and Faith Salie both have three points. Luke Burbank has two.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:51 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Bluff The Listener

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 8:25 am

Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT, WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Alonzo Bodden, Luke Burbank, and Faith Salie. And here, again, is your host at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Carl. Right now, it is time for the WAIT, WAIT...DON'T TELL ME! Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-Wait-Wait to play our game on the air. Hi, you're on WAIT, WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!

SUSAN EISEMAN LEVITIN: Hi, Peter.

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All Tech Considered
5:41 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Deciding The Fate Of Your Digital Stuff After You're Gone

A man's shadow reflects on a bus with an ad for Gmail in Lagos, Nigeria. Google has introduced Inactive Account Manager to help plan for digital life after death.
Sunday Alamba AP

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 3:56 pm

Google seems to think of everything for everyone, and the dead are no exception.

On Thursday, the company debuted the Inactive Account Manager: "You can tell us what to do with your Gmail messages and data from several other Google services if your account becomes inactive for any reason," Google explains on its public policy blog. Those services can include YouTube, Google Plus, Google Voice, Blogger and Picasa Web Albums.

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The Two-Way
4:08 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Rare On-The-Job Death For Avalanche Forecaster In Utah

Craig Patterson, 34, a seven-year veteran of avalanche forecasting for the Utah Department of Transportation.
Utah Department of Transportation

Dale Atkins has been tracking hundreds of avalanche deaths for years but the fatality report that arrived from Utah Friday morning was especially shocking.

"It's way too close to home," says Atkins, the Colorado-based president of the American Avalanche Association. "It's mind numbing...it's a slashing chill."

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The Two-Way
3:13 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Maria Tallchief, Brilliant American Ballerina Who Broke Barriers, Dies

Ballerina Maria Tallchief. Undated photo.
AP

Maria Tallchief, who broke barriers to become one of the most respected American ballerinas, died on Thursday of complications from a broken hip.

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It's All Politics
3:11 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Tiny Group Linked To McConnell Recording Causes Big Stir

Sen. Mitch McConnell and his wife, former Labor Secretary Elaine Chao, at a Republican dinner in Winchester, Ky., last month.
Roger Alford AP

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 4:19 am

So who exactly comprises Progress Kentucky, the superPAC linked to the surreptitious recording of a meeting at Sen. Mitch McConnell's campaign headquarters? In the recording, an aide is heard disparaging actress Ashley Judd, who was then considering a Senate run to challenge the Senate's top Republican.

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This Is NPR
2:50 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

An Open Letter To Backseat Babies Everywhere

Masks created for NPR's Friday Night Spin party, featuring journalists (l-r) Melissa Block, Ken Rudin, Carl Kasell and Ari Shapiro.
Jess Schreibstein

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 2:15 pm

Dear Backseat Baby,

Hey. Yeah you, in the backseat! I know you're trying to pretend like you're not listening to whatever it is Mom or Dad have droning on through the car speakers, but you should listen up. It might not seem terribly important at the moment, but there are a lot of us working on the other side of that radio, and some day, you might too.

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The Record
2:20 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

The Music Of The Venezuelan Presidential Campaigns

Alvaro Perez volunteers as a DJ at a socialist party stand in Caracas, Venezuela, playing songs in support of candidate Nicolas Maduro.
Jasmine Garsd NPR

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 7:07 pm

On Sunday, voters in Venezuela will head to the polls, and in Caracas, the noise level is as high as voters' emotions. There is a background noise that accompanies everyday life in Latin America, a constant soundtrack: music blaring from food stands and cars, loud automobiles that are so run-down they defy the laws of physics, street vendors yelling product names. I've spoken to many immigrants to the U.S. who, like me, first arrived to live in the suburbs and found the absence of bochinche, or ruckus, maddening.

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