Jim Kent is originally from Brooklyn, N.Y. A freelance writer and radio journalist who currently lives in Hot Springs, South Dakota.  Jim can be heard on a variety of radio programs including National Public Radio, South Dakota Public Radio, and National Native News Radio. He is also a columnist for the Rapid City Journal and a guest columnist for the Lakota Country Times.

Former editor of The New Lakota Times, and a correspondent with a variety of Native American newspapers, Jimâ

Parallels
12:34 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Brazil's Evangelicals A Growing Force In Prayer, Politics

Evangelical Christians pray during the "March for Jesus" in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Saturday, June 29, 2013.
Nelson Antoine AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 11:32 am

Pope Francis arrives Monday evening in Rio de Janeiro for a weeklong visit celebrating World Youth Day. Hundreds of thousands of Catholics have made the pilgrimage to see the Argentine-born pontiff, and he is expected to receive a rapturous welcome.

Still, Pope Francis's visit comes at a delicate time for the church in Brazil. Catholicism — the nation's main religion — is facing a huge challenge from evangelicals.

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The Salt
12:33 am
Mon July 22, 2013

New York Toasts Long-Awaited Revival Of Its Distilleries

Tuthilltown Spirits in New York makes a clear corn whiskey, and the first legal aged whiskey in the state since Prohibition, among other products.
Joel Rose/NPR

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 8:30 am

A century ago, New York could claim that much of its liquor was local, thanks to distilleries large and small that supplied a lot of the whiskey, gin and rum that kept New York City (and the rest of North America) lubricated. Then Prohibition arrived and the industry largely dried up, before trickling back to life in the 21st century.

Now, distillers in New York state are toasting a revival 80 years in the making.

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Nickel Tour: Get To Know Great Tour Guides
12:32 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Little Bighorn Tour Guide Brings Battle To Life

Seasonal Ranger Mike Donahue (right) discuses the Battle of Little Bighorn with Jon Jones atop Custer Hill.
Jim Kent NPR

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 9:04 am

On a scorching hot summer afternoon along the banks of the Little Bighorn River in Montana, seasonal ranger Mike Donahue brings the historical Battle of Little Bighorn to life with remarkable enthusiasm and passion.

At a recent presentation, Donahue welcomes a crowd to the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. "Why did it happen in the first place?" he asks during the presentation. "Because you had two peoples that really didn't understand or appreciate one another very well."

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Shots - Health News
12:31 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Staying Healthy May Mean Learning To Love Our Microbiomes

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 2:07 pm

Not so long ago, most people thought that the only good microbe was a dead microbe.

But then scientists started to realize that even though some bugs can make us sick and even kill us, most don't.

In fact, in the past decade attitudes about the bacteria, fungi, viruses and other microbes living all over our bodies has almost completely turned around. Now scientists say that not only are those microbes often not harmful, we can't live without them.

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Parallels
11:59 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Would Brits Throw Out Royals With Baby's Bathwater?

Cards depicting the 'royal baby' either as a boy or a girl, specially made by a games company as a publicity stunt are pictured, backdropped by members of the media waiting across the St. Mary's Hospital exclusive Lindo Wing in London on July 11, 2013.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 12:17 am

"Royal Baby Fever" is gripping Britain.

So say the breathless TV pundits gathered from round the world to report the infant's arrival.

Is it true?

An Ipsos Mori poll published this week found the Royal Family's certainly enjoying a golden age, after rebounding from the disasters of the 1990s — including the death of Princess Diana.

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In the Mode
6:36 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

In the Mode: July 21, 2013

Giovanni Paolo Colonna

On this edition of In the Mode, we will hear music by Bolognese composer Giovanni Paolo Colonna. He lived from 1637 to 1695 and was maestro de cappella at the church of San Petronio in Bologna for the last 20 years of his life where he wrote masses, motets and psalms for performance there, he was also an organist and organ builder.  We’ll hear the Houston Chamber Choir and orchestra perform his setting of psalm 126 Nisi Dominus and a Magnificat Robert Simpson conducts. 

CD TITLE: Psalmi ad Vesperas (1694) PERFORMER: Houston Chamber Choir CD: MSR 1437 

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Law
2:58 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

The Voting Rights Act: Hard-Won Gains, An Uncertain Future

People wait in line outside the Supreme Court in Washington on Feb. 27, 2013, to listen to oral arguments in the Shelby County, Ala., v. Holder voting rights case. In June, the court struck down a key provision of the law that established a formula to identify states that may require extra scrutiny by the Justice Department regarding voting procedures.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 3:21 pm

Access to the polls has not always been assured for all Americans, and before the Voting Rights Act of 1965, many were subjected to so-called literacy tests and poll tax.

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Music Interviews
1:59 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Hüsker Dü's Timekeeper Finds A Lost Paradise

Grant Hart has had an enigmatic career since his days drumming with the influential punk trio Hüsker Dü.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 2:58 pm

In the 1980's, few bands bridged the gap between hardcore punk and what would become alternative rock quite like Minnesota's Hüsker Dü.

The personalities in the trio, however, were not as harmonious, and their partnership dissolved before the decade's end. Guitarist Bob Mould went on to a successful recording career. Bassist Greg Norton dropped out of music and became a chef. And that leaves ... drummer Grant Hart.

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News
1:59 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Military Sexual Assault Bill Would Reassign Authority

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand speaks to reporters Tuesday. With her Sens. Rand Paul, R-Ky., Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., Ted Cruz, R-Texas, Barbara Boxer, D-Calif. and Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, all of whom have endorsed her bill on military sexual assault.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 2:58 pm

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., is fighting for her bill to curb sexual assaults in the military. Her measure would give independent military prosecutors, rather than commanders, the power to decide which cases should be tried in military court.

Military leaders fiercely oppose moving that authority outside the chain of command, arguing that commanders are responsible for the health and welfare of their soldiers. Removing their authority would undermine their ability to lead, they say.

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