NPR Story
2:23 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Seamus Heaney, Considered Ireland's Greatest Poet Since Yeats, Dead at 74

Irish poet Seamus Heaney is pictured in 1991. (Joe Wrinn/Harvard University via AP)

Irish poet Seamus Heaney won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1995 and penned 13 collections of poetry, two plays and four books on the process of writing poetry.

He was widely considered the country’s greatest poet since William Butler Yeats.

Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny said, “There are no words to describe adequately our nation’s and poetry’s grief.”

Heaney’s early work surrounded the rural experience, but later writings took on the political and cultural struggles in Ireland.

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Sports
1:55 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

NCAA Has Long List Of Headaches As Football Season Starts

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 4:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The college football season kicked off with several games last night, and Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Johnny Manziel will be back in action tomorrow, but not until the second half of Texas A&M's game against Rice. Sportswriter Stefan Fatsis joins us now to discuss the week in higher education. Hi, Stefan.

STEFAN FATSIS, BYLINE: Hey, Robert.

SIEGEL: Johnny Manziel was suspended by the NCAA this week for half a game. What did he do, and why half a game of all things?

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Remembrances
1:55 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Poet Seamus Heaney Was A Teacher, Critic, Translator

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 4:01 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Few have used the English language to greater effect than Irish poet Seamus Heaney, who died today in Dublin. He was 74. Heaney was a Nobel laureate and the son of a farmer, a poet reluctantly drawn into the troubled politics of his homeland who attracted long lines of fans to his readings. NPR's Lynn Neary has this remembrance.

LYNN NEARY, BYLINE: Born in Ireland's County Derry, Heaney left home at the age of 12 to go to boarding school. Heaney said the place where he grew up was still a source of energy and image bank for him.

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Around the Nation
1:55 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Summer Nights: Phoenix's Piestewa Peak

Blair Cook and his sons, Dalton and Keegan, set out to hike Piestewa Peak in Central Phoenix.
Peter O'Dowd NPR

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 4:01 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Labor Day is right around the corner, so before we mark the unofficial end of summer, here is the final installment in our series, Summer Nights. And for this last evening adventure, we head to Phoenix, where urban hikers strap on headlamps to ascend Piestewa Peak. This time of year, the desert heat can be deadly, so hikers wait until dark to climb to the summit, about 1,200 feet above the city.

Peter O'Dowd of member station KJZZ sends this postcard of one family that's been making the night trek for years.

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The Two-Way
1:40 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

N.D. Town Mulls Over Threat Of White Supremacist Takeover

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 4:05 pm

A tiny town in North Dakota is considering handing its governance over to the county to prevent a small group of outsiders from declaring a "white supremacist haven."

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The Two-Way
1:39 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Poll: Americans Want Obama To Seek Congressional OK On Syria

Demonstrators march in protest during a rally against a possible U.S. attack on Syria.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Nearly eight out of every 10 Americans want President Obama to seek congressional approval before launching an attack on Syria, according to an NBC News survey released on Friday.

The survey paints a complex picture of the American electorate. While a majority would prefer to "provide only humanitarian assistance" in Syria and 50 percent say the U.S. should not take military action, survey respondents gave conflicting responses on other questions.

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All Tech Considered
1:03 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Facebook's Latest Privacy Changes: Tag, You're You

A bigger facial recognition database could allow Facebook to collect more data about whom we are interacting with in the real world.
Dado Ruvic Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 2:11 pm

Writing a post about Facebook changing its privacy policies can feel like a fool's errand.

Nearly everyone who has a pulse — and lives part of his life online — most likely knows how Facebook makes its money and understands why this service, which connects 1.1 billion people, is free.

But here we go again.

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The Two-Way
12:35 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Heaney's Poems — Great, Dangerous, Healing — Live On

Poet Seamus Heaney, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1995, is seen here in a file photo from 1991, when he was a professor at Harvard. Heaney has died at age 74.
Joe Wrinn AP

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 2:57 pm

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Business & Economy
12:24 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Major Shakeup in Fresno Radio, Peak Broadcasting Stations Sold

Fresno's Peak Broadcasting, which owns stations in Fresno and Boise, has changed hands in a complex deal involving some of the nation's biggest radio station owners and operators.

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Shots - Health News
12:20 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Brain Changes May Explain Stroke Risk In Migraine Sufferers

Illustration by Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 5:57 am

It was hard to ignore those headlines saying that people with migraine have brain damage, even if you're not among the 12 percent or so who do suffer from these painful, recurring headaches.

Don't panic, says the neurologist whose work sparked those alarming headlines. "It's still not something to stay up nights worrying about," says Dr. Richard Lipton, director of the Montefiore Headache Center in New York.

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