Science
12:04 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Bald Eagles Are Back In A Big Way — And The Talons Are Out

Bryan Watts, a conservation biologist at the College of William and Mary, and biology graduate student Courtney Turrin, survey eagle behavior along the James River in late-summer.
Elizabeth Shogren NPR

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 5:48 pm

"It's a jungle if you're an eagle right now on the Chesapeake Bay," says Bryan Watts, a conservation biologist at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va. "You have to watch your back."

Americans have long imagined their national symbol as a solitary, noble bird soaring on majestic wings. The birds are indeed gorgeous and still soar, but the notion that they are loners is outdated, Watts and other conservationists are finding.

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Sweetness And Light
11:15 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Why Keep Athletes Eligible But Uneducated?

Ersin Kisacik iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 1:31 pm

Each football season brings exciting plays and game heroes, but Frank Deford says the real heroes are often overlooked.

As another school year and college football season gets underway, Deford looks at the frustrations and challenges facing educators to keep student athletes eligible.

Click on the audio link above to hear Deford's take on this issue.

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The Two-Way
10:19 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Ariel Castro, Ohio Man Who Held Women For Years, Is Dead

Ariel Castro in court on July 17.
Marvin Fong The Plain Dealer/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 10:41 am

Corrections officials in Ohio say convicted Cleveland kidnapper Ariel Castro is believed to have committed suicide in his cell Tuesday night.

They say he was found hanged around 9:20 p.m. EDT at the Correctional Reception Center in Orient, Ohio, a short distance southwest of Columbus.

Castro was serving a life sentence for holding three women captive in his Cleveland home for about a decade.

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U.S.
5:14 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Bay Bridge Reopens After Troubled Makeover

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 2:04 pm

San Francisco's Bay Bridge is open again, after being closed over the weekend to allow the last phase of a retrofitting project to finish up. While commuters are celebrating the bridge's return, the project was a lesson in cost overruns and delays.

Health Care
5:13 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Home Birth Midwives Would Keep Attending to 'Low Risk' Pregnancies, Under California Bill

In modern times, midwives tending to homebirths have largely been marginalized from mainstream medicine. But a bill moving through the California legislature could foster stronger links between midwives and obstetricians.
Credit Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

Midwives have been delivering babies for most of human history. In modern times, midwives tending to homebirths have largely been marginalized from mainstream medicine. But a bill moving through the California legislature could foster stronger links between midwives and obstetricians. Capital Public Radio’s Health Care Reporter Pauline Bartolone has more.

In Tosi Marceline’s practice, pre-natal check-ups happen in the living room.

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Commentary
3:56 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Commentary: Californians Should "Get Busy" To Solve A Slowing Birth Rate

Sam Mathews' father, Joe, who writes for Zocalo Public Square

At the moment of my birth—a moment that occurred only last week—I was the most valuable child in the history of California.

That’s not merely the opinion of my proud father, the usual author of this Connecting California column. And that’s not the idle boast of a 7-day-old infant. My value is a hard demographic and economic fact for California—and a huge burden for me.

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It's All Politics
3:52 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

What If Congress Votes 'No' On Syria?

President Obama attends a White House meeting on Syria Tuesday with congressional leaders.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 4:30 pm

With Republican House leaders lining up behind President Obama's planned U.S. military strike on Syria, the chances for congressional authorization seemed higher on Tuesday than they did over the weekend.

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Government & Politics
3:10 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Crunch Time Begins for California Lawmakers

The California State Assembly (file photo)
Credit Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

The California legislature enters its home stretch today. Lawmakers have just two weeks left to debate hundreds of bills.  Ben Adler reports from Sacramento on some of the major issues still on the table.

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The Two-Way
3:10 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

5 Years After Being Covered With Water, Chinese Village Emerges

A July photo shows houses that have emerged from Tangjiashan Barrier Lake in Xuanping Township, in southwest China's Sichuan Province.
Liu Huawei Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 3:11 pm

It's been a long time since the people who lived in rural Xuanping saw their little town, which was flooded by a powerful earthquake in 2008. But thanks to a steep drop in water levels, parts of their village in China's Sichuan Province are visible again, from homes and businesses to its school.

The village's ghostly return began in July, when water levels fell from 712 meters to 703 meters above sea level — a difference of nearly 30 feet, as news site China Daily Asia reported.

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Valley Edition
3:05 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Author Interview: Seth Holmes Talks About Farmworkers' "Broken Bodies"

Seth Holmes book "Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United State" takes a look into the lives of migrant workers on the West Coast.
Credit http://sph-publications.berkeley.edu/

As the House and Senate continue to struggle to find common ground on the issue of immigration reform, one University of California, Berkeley professor is working to bring new insights into a significant group of undocumented immigrants here in California and throughout the west – those who pick the food we eat every day.

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