U.S.
2:16 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

BP Wants To Halt Deepwater Horizon Claims Process

Crude oil that leaked from the Deepwater Horizon oil rig sits on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010.
Chris Graythen Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 2:21 pm

BP is fighting the settlement it agreed to last summer that let the oil company avoid thousands of potential lawsuits over the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

Just after the spill, when oil was still gushing into the Gulf, BP touted the $20 billion it set aside for claims. But now it says the claim process is corrupt and is hoping a court will overturn the settlement that established the claims fund.

Ending the claims would mean stopping a well-oiled machine.

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The Two-Way
2:12 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Reports: NSA Has Keys To Most Internet Encryption

The National Security Agency headquarters at Fort Meade, Md.
Saul Loeb Getty Images

The National Security Agency has the keys to most Internet encryption methods and it has gotten them by using supercomputers to break them and by enlisting the help of private IT companies, The New York Times and The Guardian are reporting.

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The Salt
2:11 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Japanese Whiskey Teases U.S. Consumers By Playing Hard To Get

Suntory's 30-year-old Hibiki whiskey took home the top award at the International Spirits Challenge in 2003. This unexpected triumph was Japanese whiskey's big coming-out party on the global spirits stage.
Courtesy of Suntory

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 4:31 pm

Scotland is the de facto king of whisky. But now an unlikely challenger — Japan — is making a name for its whiskey far beyond its borders. Unfortunately for Americans, this highly coveted Japanese whiskey is very hard to come by.

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NPR Story
1:26 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Illegal Immigration A Hot Issue In Australian Election

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 3:10 pm

A tightly-fought Australian general election campaign reaches its climax on Saturday — and the major issues will be familiar to an American audience. With little to choose between the economic policies of the two major parties, immigration and same-sex marriage are top of the news agenda.

NPR Story
1:26 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

What Elevated Kale From Vegetable To Cultural Identifier?

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 3:10 pm

Of all the healthy foods you could eat, what inspires some people to wear kale T-shirts and sport kale stickers? Why do some people see kale as a part of their identities?

Around the Nation
1:26 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Sailors With Disabilities Find Freedom On The Water

Members of the Bay Area Association of Disabled Sailors sail every weekend near San Francisco's Pier 40. The all-volunteer group serves people with a range of physical, developmental and mental disabilities.
Emily Green for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 2:21 pm

If you think sailing at 40 mph sounds challenging, imagine doing it all alone without the use of your arms or legs, or without hearing or with limited vision. Every weekend in San Francisco, a group of sailors with disabilities does just that, taking to the water to push their bodies to the limit.

Cristina Rubke and her father, Chris, are members of the Bay Area Association of Disabled Sailors. On a recent Saturday, they were at San Francisco's Pier 40, where the dock is awash in activity.

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NPR Story
1:05 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Is This The End Of The College Boom?

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 2:56 pm

The Census Bureau reports that the number of students pursuing college degrees has fallen for the first time since 2006.

The greatest decline happened among students age 25 and older.

Derek Thompson, business editor for The Atlantic, joins us to explain what the statistics mean.

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NPR Story
1:05 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Middle East Expert Says Don't Rush To War With Syria

Fawaz A. Gerges is pictured in 2007. (Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 2:56 pm

Fawaz Gerges is a longtime observer of the Middle East and fears the United States is rushing to take military action in Syria.

Gerges, a professor of international relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, says Assad’s use of force and likely use of chemical weapons against his people should not be tolerated.

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NPR Story
1:05 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Remembering The 1972 Olympic Massacre

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 2:56 pm

As the International Olympic Committee meets to decide whether Tokyo, Istanbul or Madrid will host the 2020 summer Olympics, we look back to a terrible moment in Olympic history.

On September 5, 1972, Palestinian terrorists stormed into the apartment where 11 Israeli athletes were staying in Munich.

Two men were killed and the other nine were taken hostage. By the time the crisis ended, all of them were dead.

American marathon runner Kenny Moore and his roommate Frank Shorter were staying in a nearby apartment.

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The Two-Way
12:48 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

California Rim Fire Was Started By Hunter's 'Illegal' Fire

A firefighter uses a hose to douse the flames of the Rim Fire on Saturday near Groveland, California.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

The wildfire still burning north of Yosemite National Park — you know, the one that has charred 237,341 acres and was at one point one of the largest fires in recent California history — was started by a hunter's illegal fire.

The U.S. Forest Service said in a statement that its investigators had concluded that the Rim Fire "began when a hunter allowed an illegal fire to escape."

Authorities, said the Forest Service, have made no arrest and they are not releasing the name of the hunter.

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