The Two-Way
1:12 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Baby Moose Benefits From Anglers' Unlikely Catch And Release

Dr. Karen Sciascia of Red Hill, Pa., holds a baby moose she and Four Rivers Fishing Co. guide Seth McLean rescued from a river in southwestern Montana, in a photo taken just before they released the animal on the bank where its mother waited.
Four Rivers Fishing Co. AP

Dr. Karen Sciascia of Red Hill, Pa., has delivered thousands of babies in her career. But on a vacation to Montana this week, she helped deliver another life from danger, as she and her fishing guide saved a baby moose that was separated from its mother as they crossed a river.

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Monkey See
12:51 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

When 'G' Movies Are For Kids, Do Kids Avoid 'G' Movies?

The 1939 film The Wizard Of Oz was rated G. The 2013 film Oz the Great and Powerful was rated PG. The difference? Maybe a little violence and a womanizing leading man.
AP/Walt Disney Pictures

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 2:38 pm

If you're a parent with small children, summer is traditionally a time when there's lots for them to see at the multiplex. That's not untrue this summer. But if you're specifically looking for a film with a G rating, you may just be out of luck.

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The Salt
12:04 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

How To Clean Up Fish Farms And Raise More Seafood At The Same Time

Thierry Chopin from the University of New Brunswick examines a raft that holds strings of seaweed. The seaweed grows around pens of farmed salmon and soaks up some of the nutrients that would otherwise pollute the Bay of Fundy.
Richard Harris NPR

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 2:38 pm

Last month, we told you about companies that are growing salmon on dry land. That's an effective — but expensive — way to reduce water pollution caused by fish farms. After all, marine aquaculture provides about half of the seafood we eat.

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The Two-Way
12:00 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Russian President Vladimir Putin, Wife Call It Quits

In this handout photo, Russian President Vladimir Putin and his wife, Lyudmila Putina, await the arrival of G-8 leaders for an informal dinner in July 2006 in Peterhof, Russia.
Handout Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 1:58 pm

After a 30-year marriage, Vladimir Putin announced on state television that he was divorcing his wife, Lyudmila.

Russia Today reports Putin and Lyudmila attended the Esmeralda ballet at the Grand Kremlin Palace, where they broke the news.

According to Russia Today, the country's official English-language news outlet, Putin said it was a "joint decision." RT adds:

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Movies
11:50 am
Thu June 6, 2013

From 'RoboCop To 'Robot & Frank': Best RoboMovies Of All Time

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Two writers can take credit or blame for the legions of metal men that marched through the movies - Karel Capek, who coined the word robot in his play "R.U.R." in 1920, and Isaac Asimov, who codified the Three Laws of Robotics and a series of stories collected in "I, Robot," and mostly ignored in the Will Smith movie of the same name.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "I, ROBOT")

WILL SMITH: (as Detective Del Spooner) You know what they say, laws are made to be broken.

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Parallels
11:08 am
Thu June 6, 2013

In Turkey, Protesters Proudly Call Themselves 'Looters'

Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Ankara on Tuesday.
Umit Bektas Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 11:59 am

Turkey's Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has shown no sympathy for the tens of thousands of protesters who've taken to the streets across the country. In fact, he seems to have energized the protesters by calling them capulcu, or "looters" in Turkish.

Demonstrators have gleefully embraced the label, spreading it far and wide on social media and turning a local protest into an event that has attracted international attention.

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Author Interviews
11:02 am
Thu June 6, 2013

The Patient Who Let Us Peek Inside A Brain In 'Present Tense'

In her latest book about Henry Molaison, Corkin tells the story of the amnesic man she studied for a half-century, whose brain helped teach neuroscientists about the distinctions between memory and intellect.
Basic Books

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 2:03 pm

In 1953, 27-year-old Henry Gustave Molaison underwent an experimental brain surgery in an attempt to alleviate his severe epileptic seizures. The surgery left him with a form of amnesia; he could remember many things from the past, but was unable to form new memories.

"He could tell us about where he was born, [that] his father's family was from Thibodaux, La., his mother came from Ireland," says neuroscientist Suzanne Corkin. "He talked about the towns in Hartford where he lived and about his specific neighbors. He knew the schools he attended, some of his classmates' names."

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Music Reviews
11:01 am
Thu June 6, 2013

Jason Isbell: Literary, But Keeping An Edge On 'Southeastern'

Jason Isbell's latest album, Southeastern, is personal and intimate.
Michael Wilson Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 12:18 pm

When Jason Isbell was part of Drive-By Truckers, his guitar contributed to the band's sometimes magnificent squall of noise, while his songwriting contributed to the eloquence that raised the band high in the Southern rock pantheon. But the group was led by two other first-rate songwriters, Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley.

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The Two-Way
11:00 am
Thu June 6, 2013

3 Things You Need To Know About The NBA Finals

LeBron James of the Miami Heat.
Brent Smith Reuters /Landov

We won't dwell on the obvious. If you care about basketball at all, you know by now that Game 1 of the NBA finals is set for Thursday night in Miami, where the hometown Heat will play the San Antonio Spurs.

Time: 9 p.m. ET.

Broadcaster: ABC-TV.

Led by LeBron James, Miami is defending its 2012 championship. Led by Tim Duncan, San Antonio is looking to win its fifth title.

It's a best-of-seven series.

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The Two-Way
10:57 am
Thu June 6, 2013

'An Inland Ocean Of Flooding': Disaster In Central Europe

A cloverleaf is partially flooded by the river Danube near Deggendorf, southern Germany, on June 6, 2013.
Christof Stache AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 12:31 pm

At least 16 people are dead after several days of flooding in Austria, Germany, Slovakia and the Czech Republic. Historic cities are underwater, and flood victims are perching on rooftops for safety. It's been a rainy spring in the region, and heavy storms last weekend forced many rivers and streams over their banks.

And more rain is forecast for this weekend in parts of central Europe.

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