The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
2:41 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Joining The '63 March, Despite Parents' Racial Biases

All Washington, D.C., liquor stores were closed on Aug. 28, 1963. While Maury Landsman's parents, who owned a liquor store, stayed home that day, he was determined to participate in the march.
Charles Del Vecchio The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 5:41 pm

There would be no last call on the day of the March on Washington, and Manny and Mitzie Landsman had no choice in the matter. Their D.C. shop, Metro Liquors, was closed for business on Aug. 28, 1963, just one of 1,900 businesses ordered by local authorities not to sell, pour or wrap any alcoholic beverage from 12:01 that morning until 2 a.m. the next day.

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NPR Story
2:18 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Syria Fallout: Expect Volatile Gas Prices

The U.S. stock market has seen the biggest sell-off since May last year, and overnight the wholesale price of gas jumped up 10 cents, a cost that may or may not be passed on to consumers at the pump.

Markets watcher Phil Flynn says the crisis in Syria is “not a positive” on the global economy.

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NPR Story
2:18 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

'I Have A Dream' Still Resonates With Today's Teens

High school sophomores Justin Morales, 14, Triston Childs, 15, Rachael Smith, 15, and Deja Brown, 14, watch Martin Luther King’s "I Have a Dream" speech. (Jenny Brundin/Colorado Public Radio)

Fifty years ago today, Martin Luther King Jr. unleashed a powerful and poetic torrent upon the nation — a passionate plea for racial equality and economic justice for African Americans.

Fifty years later, the “I Have a Dream” speech still resonates with a group of teenagers at William Smith High School in Aurora, a racially and ethnically diverse city east of Denver.

They recently sat down with Colorado Public Radio education reporter Jenny Brundin to watch the speech, talk about it and share their own dreams.

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NPR Story
2:18 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

One Of The 'Little Rock Nine' Reflects On Her Legacy

Members of the Little Rock Nine are escorted into Central High School, in 1957. They were the first black children to attend the all-white school. (Wikipedia)

Many of the people attending today’s commemoration of the March on Washington played roles big and small in the civil rights movement, from registering black voters in the South to helping to end school segregation.

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The Two-Way
2:17 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

China Weighs Ban On Homework; Teachers, Students Argue Against

In the hopes of easing pressures on China's students, the country' education officials are considering a ban on written homework. Here, students walk to school in Beijing in June.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

Chinese officials hope to rein in teachers who assign too much homework, as the country's Ministry of Education considers new rules that ban schools from requiring students to complete written tasks at home. Citing undue stress on students, the ministry would also limit the number of exams students take.

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Media
2:13 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Kelly McEvers Reflects On Middle East Reporting As She Leaves Region

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 3:39 pm

Melissa Block has an exit interview with Kelly McEvers, who's ending a grueling years-long assignment in the Middle East that included coverage of Iraq, Syria and beyond. McEvers and her NPR colleague Deborah Amos, won four major awards in 2012 for coverage of the Syrian conflict.

NPR Story
2:13 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Teen Victoria Duval Pulls Off Major Upset At U.S. Open

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 3:39 pm

American teenager Victoria Duval pulled off a first round upset at the U.S. Open last night when she beat the 2011 tennis champ Samantha Stosur.

Shots - Health News
2:13 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

In South Africa, A Clinic Focuses On Prostitutes To Fight HIV

A prostitute in Johannesburg waits for a client on a street corner. An estimated two-thirds of sex workers in South Africa are HIV positive.
Yoav Lemmer AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 6:25 pm

South Africa has come a long way in dealing with AIDS. The country has been successful in getting drug treatment to millions of people infected with HIV.

But the country still has one of the highest rates of HIV infection in the world — and the virus continues to spread. Nearly 400,000 South Africans are infected with HIV each year.

One health clinic in the heart of Johannesburg is attempting to break the HIV cycle by focusing on people at extremely high risk for infection — prostitutes.

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The Salt
2:13 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

The Latest Frontier In Gourmet Salt, From The Lowest Point On Earth

An Israeli man bathes in the Dead Sea. Spas have long touted the health benefits of the Dead Sea. So does Naked Sea Salt.
Sebastian Scheiner AP

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 5:34 am

When you go to the Dead Sea for a float in its extraordinarily buoyant waters, signs warn you not to drink a drop. "Did you swallow water?" one Dead Sea do's and don'ts list asks. "Go immediately to the lifeguard."

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Shots - Health News
2:05 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Illicit Drugs And Mental Illness Take A Huge Global Toll

A homeless man smokes crack in the Barrio Triste neighborhood in Medellin, Colombia.
Raul Arboleda AFP/Getty Images

Mental disorders and substance abuse are the leading causes of nonfatal illness on the planet, according to an ambitious analysis of data from around the world.

A companion report, the first of its kind, documents the global impact of four illicit drugs: heroin and other opiates, amphetamines, cocaine and cannabis. It calls illegal drugs "an important contributor to the global burden of disease."

The two papers are being published by The Lancet as part of a continuing project called the Global Burden of Disease.

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