Parallels
8:06 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Why Is The Global Shipbuilding Business Struggling?

Laborers stand on a new ship at a Rongsheng Heavy Industries shipyard in Nantong, China, in 2012. The troubles at Rongsheng, China's largest private shipbuilder, mirror what's happening in the global industry.
Aly Song Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 9:43 am

There's news this week that shipbuilder STX Finland will close what it describes as "the world's leading ferry builder," a yard where the company also built small cruise ships, icebreakers and naval craft.

The company blamed economic conditions for the closure of the Rauma Shipyard. Work from there will be shifted to the company's facility in Turku. About 700 people will lose their jobs.

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The Two-Way
7:59 am
Tue September 17, 2013

WATCH: Time-Lapse Video Of The Costa Concordia Being Righted

The wrecked cruise ship Costa Concordia, now back in an upright position.
Claudio Giovannini EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 11:14 am

Take a minute if you want a break from the heavy news to see the cruise ship Costa Concordia being brought into an upright position.

Reuters is among several news outlets that have posted time-lapse video, condensing the 19-hour Monday-into-Tuesday operation into about 60 seconds.

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Shots - Health News
7:18 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Laid Off And Looking For Health Insurance? Beware Of COBRA

After losing a job, figuring out health insurance may be the smartest first step.
Franck Camhi iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 11:14 am

People who lose their jobs and the health insurance tied to them will have new coverage options when the Affordable Care Act's marketplaces open in October.

But consumer advocates are concerned many of these unemployed people may not realize this and lock themselves into pricier coverage than they need.

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Heller McAlpin is a New York-based critic who reviews books regularly for NPR.org, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, The Christian Science Monitor, The San Francisco Chronicle and other publications.

Book Reviews
6:55 am
Tue September 17, 2013

In 'Sprinkler,' A Wacky Poet Returns With New Obsessions

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 7:06 am

Nicholson Baker has become a sort of poet of the particular and the peculiar. His books are filled with people who focus minutely on what captivates them – in other words, obsessives. A positive way of looking at obsession is as passion taken to an extreme. The danger, of course, is that the object of one person's intense fascination — such as the broken shoelaces in his unforgettable first novel, The Mezzanine, or the disquisitions on Debussy, dance music, and drones in his latest, Traveling Sprinkler — may spell another's total snore.

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NPR Story
6:38 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Is It Possible To Remove Chemical Weapons In Syria Under Current Conditions?

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Let's talk next with the United Nations official who oversaw the U.N.'s report on the use of poison gas in Syria. This report does not specify who used those chemical weapons, but the United States and others say evidence in that report backs their claim that the Assad regime was behind the attack.

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The Two-Way
6:27 am
Tue September 17, 2013

Company Promises To Pay For Hawaii's Massive Molasses Spill

One of the fish thought to have died because of the molasses spill off Honolulu.
Hugh Gentry Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 7:33 am

Matson Inc., the shipping company that spilled 233,000 gallons of molasses into Honolulu Harbor earlier this month, has pledged to pay all the costs stemming from the disaster that has devastated marine life there.

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Book Reviews
6:24 am
Tue September 17, 2013

A Predictably Pynchonian Take On The Internet And Sept. 11

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 4:07 pm

I approached this review with a little bit of dread. How do you write about the iconic novelist Thomas Pynchon, whose books are strange and difficult things, and whose die-hard readers gather online to wax poetic, and use words like Pynchonian, Pynchonalia and Pynchonesque? They are just so into him, and often so articulate about their love. If you read the thoughtful and detailed writing by Pynchon devotees, they make a very persuasive case.

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The Two-Way
5:46 am
Tue September 17, 2013

No Inflation In Sight As Federal Reserve Policymakers Meet

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 7:31 am

Consumer prices rose a scant 0.1 percent in August from July and were up a modest 1.5 percent since August 2012, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said Tuesday morning.

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The Two-Way
5:19 am
Tue September 17, 2013

The High Costs Of Colorado's High Water, By The Numbers

A man walks across the washed-out Wagonwheel Gap Road in Boulder, Colo., on Monday.
Mark Leffingwell Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 12:04 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': KUNC's Grace Hood reports on the flooding in Colorado
  • On 'Morning Edition': Mark Benjamin of Bellview, Colo., talks about life beyond washed-out roads

The flooding that has roared through communities and canyons across Colorado's Front Range in recent days is now being blamed for:

-- as many as eight deaths

-- damaging or destroying 19,000 homes

-- causing up to $500 million worth of damage to roads and highways.

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