Crime In The City
11:57 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

In Neville's Thrillers, Belfast's Violent Past Still Burns

Bonfires light up the Belfast skyline on July 12, 1997, as Protestant loyalists commemorate the 17th century victory of a Protestant king over his deposed Catholic predecessor. Known as the Battle of the Boyne, the confrontation is part of a long history of tensions in the region.
Paul McErlane AP

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 10:13 am

At 41, with long black hair, Stuart Neville looks more like the rock guitarist he used to be than the author he is now. He lives in a small town with his family — not in Belfast, Northern Ireland, the city that plays a central role in his thrillers, but just outside it.

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U.S.
11:56 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

Visa Exchange Program Draws Scrutiny Under Immigration Bill

Australian counselors at the French Woods camp in upstate New York celebrate their culture on July 4, 2012. All of French Woods' foreign employees work in the United States through the J-1 visa program.
Courtesy of French Woods Festival of the Performing Arts

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 10:33 am

Landing a job at a summer camp or at an amusement park is a rite of passage for many young Americans. Those jobs also appeal to foreigners participating in a cultural exchange using J-1 visas. But with U.S. youth unemployment at 25 percent, Congress is now taking a close look at the J-1 visa exchange program.

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It's All Politics
11:53 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

Wisconsin's Walker Downplays Presidential Buzz

Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker reacts at his victory party in Waukesha, Wis., in June 2012 after defeating Democratic challenger Tom Barrett in a special recall election.
Morry Gash AP

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 10:13 am

A little more than a year ago, Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker survived a recall election after an epic battle with unions that gave him folk-hero status with many conservatives. Some political observers now consider him a presidential contender.

But Walker is downplaying that talk, even as he takes steps that hint at national ambition.

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The Two-Way
4:37 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

Obama To Name Top Lawyer As Guantanamo Closure Envoy

Washington lawyer Clifford Sloan is expected to be President Obama's pick to close the prison at Guantanamo Bay, NPR has confirmed.

The Associated Press, which first reported the news, said Sloan will reopen the Office of Guantanamo Closure, which was shut in January. A formal announcement is expected Monday.

Sloan is a partner at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom LLP law firm. His bio on the firm's website says:

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National Security
2:40 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

Privacy Past And Present: A Saga Of American Ambivalence

Protesters gather outside the U.S. Capitol on Thursday to rally against the National Security Agency's recently detailed surveillance programs.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 3:17 pm

America's privacy concerns go back to the origins of the country itself.

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Author Interviews
1:27 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

A Posthumous Tribute To Guns From A Sniper Shot To Death

Firearms designer John Browning submitted this design for the M1911 pistol to the U.S. Patent Office in September 1910.
Courtesy William Morrow

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 3:17 pm

A killing on a Texas gun range in February captured the headlines. The victim was Chris Kyle, considered by many to be the most deadly sniper in American military history.

The man who admitted to killing him was a veteran as well — a young, disturbed man who had been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder.

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Music Interviews
12:58 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

'Glee' Guy Matthew Morrison On His First Love: Broadway

Matthew Morrison's musical life didn't start on TV; the Glee star is a Tony-nominated stage actor. Where It All Began is his second album of show tunes and standards.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 3:22 pm

Long before became known as Will Schuester — the lovable Spanish teacher and show choir director on TV's Glee — Matthew Morrison was dancing and singing, garnering Tony nods for his work on the Broadway stage.

Through it all, there was one song he always kept at the ready: "On the Street Where You Live" from My Fair Lady.

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Author Interviews
12:54 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

Dr. Brazelton On Guiding Parents And Learning To Listen

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 3:17 pm

For the better part of the past century, Dr. T. Berry Brazelton has studied babies, helping change the way we think about and care for them — right from the time they take their first breaths.

The renowned pediatrician hosted the long-running TV show What Every Baby Knows, and has written more than 30 books about child development. Hospitals worldwide rely on his newborn assessment known as the Brazelton scale.

At age 95, he's still going strong.

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Parallels
12:43 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

Iran's New President A Relative Moderate

Hasan Rowhani gestures to his supporters at a rally in Tehram Iran, on June 1. The midranking cleric, Iran's president-elect, is seen as a political moderate.
Ebrahim Noroozi AP

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 12:52 pm

Calling it an era of wisdom and moderation, Iran's new president, Hasan Rowhani, vowed to integrate the country back into the international community and asked Western nations to adopt a more "respectful rhetoric" toward Iran.

His triumph Saturday with 18 million votes, slightly over half of the cast ballots, surprised many Iranians who had suspected that the leadership would repeat the controversial elections of 2009 that led to the re-election of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. By accepting Rowhani's victory, the regime may be taking a step to restore some of its lost legitimacy.

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The Two-Way
10:28 am
Sun June 16, 2013

Turkey's Premier Says It's His Duty To Crush Protests

Protesters climb onto a police truck mounted with a water cannon during clashes with riot police at a demonstration in Ankara on Sunday.
Adem Altan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 12:45 pm

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Sunday defended his order to forcibly evict thousands of anti-government protesters from Istanbul's Taksim Square, saying he had simply carried out his "duty" as the nation's leader.

In a speech to hundreds of thousands of supporters, Erdogan also railed against foreign media coverage and social media amid criticism of his government's handling of the protests, The Associated Press reports.

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